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Author Topic: What is General Coverage Recieve?  (Read 3793 times)
KJ6TSX
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Posts: 116




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« on: June 01, 2012, 09:12:47 PM »

It's time for the Friday night dumb question  Roll Eyes
I was looking at a old Kenwood ts-830s in the description it says (This transceiver does not have general coverage receive).
I am not exactly sure what that means.
Thanks
George
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N3OX
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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2012, 09:21:02 PM »

Most rigs these days will receive from some low frequency (few hundred kHz on many) up to 30MHz with no gaps ("general" coverage)

But older rigs more often only receive inside the ham bands.
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
N6GND
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Posts: 375




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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2012, 09:55:06 PM »

The Kenwood TS 830 has what is often called "bikini coverage"--it covers only the essential parts of the spectrum.
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W5FYI
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2012, 11:03:07 PM »

To expand on Dan's answer, some radios, like my old Yaesu FT101, will only receive on the ham bands and the 30-meter WWV band. Many radios now permit reception on all the popular shortwave frequencies, including commercial and government bands, making it easy to listen to foreign commercial and propaganda broadcasts, aviation radio, numbers stations, ship-to-shore, maritime weather reports, etc.

When I was stationed overseas, I used my rig's "general coverage receive" connected to my Commodore C-64 computer to receive news service teletype dispatches in the commercial bands. My colleagues were amazed that I seemed to know of news events several days in advance of the Stars and Stripes newspaper, and several hours ahead of Armed Forces Radio. I even had the Intelligence Officer stumped over where I was getting my information. It was great fun!
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K7KBN
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2012, 02:05:40 PM »

To expand on Dan's answer, some radios, like my old Yaesu FT101, will only receive on the ham bands and the 30-meter WWV band. Many radios now permit reception on all the popular shortwave frequencies, including commercial and government bands, making it easy to listen to foreign commercial and propaganda broadcasts, aviation radio, numbers stations, ship-to-shore, maritime weather reports, etc.

When I was stationed overseas, I used my rig's "general coverage receive" connected to my Commodore C-64 computer to receive news service teletype dispatches in the commercial bands. My colleagues were amazed that I seemed to know of news events several days in advance of the Stars and Stripes newspaper, and several hours ahead of Armed Forces Radio. I even had the Intelligence Officer stumped over where I was getting my information. It was great fun!

In 1963 I was assigned to keeping commercial press broadcasts from AP, UPI and Reuters up reliably so the ship would have up-to-the-hour-if-not-faster news reports.  Because of this, I was the first man on the Kitty Hawk to know that JFK had been shot, and then the first to know of his death.  It took over half an hour for "Official" Navy messages to spread the word.  Of course, this was back when there were no communications satellites.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K4RVN
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Posts: 769




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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2012, 04:01:24 PM »

A genral coverage receiver is one that tunes in the local AM commercial broadcast stations as well as those far away if you have a good antenna connected.  For instance, I can listen to WSM in Nashville, Tn. from metro Atlanta with my Icom 7200.

Frank
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 04:03:10 PM by K4RVN » Logged
AA4PB
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Posts: 12836




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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2012, 04:22:56 PM »

A general coverage receiver doesn't necessarily have to cover the AM broadcast band. For example, a 2-30MHz receiver would be general coverage but NOT tune the AM broadcast band. General coverage means that it covers a wide range of frequencies, many of which are outside of the ham bands. Thats as opposed to a "ham band only" receiver that covers only the ham bands and nearby adjacent frequencies.

General coverage is about frequency range and not the ability to receive local vs long distance stations.
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KD0REQ
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Posts: 931




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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2012, 05:06:08 PM »

"General Coverage" is bandless, continuous tuning with or without bandswitching coils in... the old "DC to daylight" stuff.  in the olden golden days when radios glowed in the dark and had enough voltage to kill the entire US First Army if they were holding hands, it usually meant commercial broadcast at 540 KHz to whatever the older model tubes would still amplify, usually in the 20 to 30 Mc range.

of course these days, it's more likely you will catch the First Army holding hands, but you know what I meant.

variants of DC to daylight might go down to the audible range if you happened onto the right kind of military surplus, and could go to 50 MHz or higher.

on a 6-inch dial area, 80 meters would be a half inch, just so you know how to find them at a glance in a dustpile.
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K4RVN
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2012, 07:19:42 PM »

The Ham glossary reads a receiver used to listen to a wide range of frequencies. I have three general coverage receivers.
Two tune from 540 to 30 mhz and one tunes up to 54 mhz. In general most general coverage will include the broadcast band of 540 to 1.8 Mhz. From there on up is 160 meters, etc ham bands and short wave listening frequencies. This expands on my first post as an attempt to convey some helpful information, but is not all inclusive I know. That was a good question not dumb. I'm way behind times since frequencies have expanded on radios in the past 50 years.

Here is another definition from KC4GZX Radio Terms site.  General coverage A term used to describe receivers and transmitters covering at least the frequency range of 500 kHz to 30 MHz and capable of operation in several different modes, including AM, CW, and SSB.
Hope this helps.

Frank
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 07:33:34 PM by K4RVN » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 4565




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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2012, 10:01:20 PM »

The pre WW2 HRO covered 50kHz to 30MHz with a gap between 430 and 480kHz. That was real general coverage. Even the WW2 BC348 went down to around 200kHz, with a gap in the B C band because of its 915kHz IF.

General coverage doesn't have to include the BC band.
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K4RVN
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2012, 11:26:22 PM »

Peter, according to  the ARRL glossary most would include the broadcast band. That does not mean all but does agree with my post that in general they would include the broadcast band. I also think it is much to do about nothing, sound familiar?

ARRL Glossary
General-coverage receiver--A receiver used to listen to a wide range of frequencies. Most general-coverage receivers tune from frequencies below the standard-broadcast band to at least 30 MHz. These frequencies include the shortwave-broadcast bands and the amateur bands from 160 to 10 meters.

http://www.arrl.org/ham-radio-glossary Click on the +G

Frank
 
 
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 11:28:13 PM by K4RVN » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 4565




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« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2012, 07:39:54 AM »

Quite a few European professional receivers described themselves as 'general coverage' and didn't cover the BC band. But in Europe, BC also meant 150 to to 240KHz or thereabouts. Some were 'general coverage', but something like 20 to 170 MHz

But a 'general coverage' receiver wasn't limited to the amateur or indeed, any specific bands.
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