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Author Topic: 75 Meter Ham Stick  (Read 3942 times)
N7PHL
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Posts: 21




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« on: June 11, 2012, 09:31:57 PM »

I really hate to ask this because it could very well be operator error.......Smiley

This past Saturday I bought a 75m ham stick from a vender at a local Ham Fest. The package only has 3 parts: the mast, about 4 ft long, the metal whip, about 3 ft long, and the connector for the whip to be inserted in to with the other end of the connector that is suppsoed to be connected into the top of the mast. The bottom of the mast has a treaded part that screws into the vehicle mount.

Problem: the part that the whip screws in to is supposed to be screwed into the mast top. The mast top does NOT have threads that you should be able to screw the whip connector in to.

Am I brain dead.... can someone tell me what I am doing wrong..

thans,

Phil
N7PHL
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AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2012, 04:15:54 AM »

Real "Hamsticks" by WD4BUM (or at least, all the ones I have ever owned) don't have a threaded fitting at the top for the whip.  There's a metal cap with a couple of setscrews at the top of the fiberglass mast, and the whip goes inside the hole in the cap, and is held by the setscrews.

I've also got a bunch of similar but non-hamstick-brand antennas, and many of those have the screw-in fitting at the top, that holds the whip.

This is a dumb question, but have you tried to see if the whip will go into the mast without the screw-in fitting?  If it's a real Hamstick, you shouldn't need the fitting; maybe the vendor included it in error.
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WX7G
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2012, 04:50:26 AM »

And if it is a real Hamstick make sure the whip does not slide all the way into the antenna. It can cut the loading coil wire.
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N7PHL
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2012, 06:31:16 AM »

The whip would slide all the way to the bottom of the mast (inside). and if there were a way to set screw the whip at the top of the mast then there would be a "cup" area open to the elements where the threads should be.........

Phil
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W5DXP
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2012, 09:00:52 AM »

Am I brain dead.... can someone tell me what I am doing wrong.

There are two kinds of hamsticks. One is two pieces, a bottom section and a stinger. The other design is three pieces. A bottom section, a stinger, and a threaded fitting between the bottom section and the stinger. Sounds like you have pieces from two different styles of hamsticks.

Can't you just forget the threaded fitting and install the stinger into the top of the bottom section that has no threads? If the stinger is too large for the hole in the bottom section, then you indeed have parts from two different style hamsticks and need a smaller diameter stinger.

P.S. I predict that you will be dissatisfied with the performance of a 75m hamstick as it is less than one percent efficient.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2012, 09:02:58 AM by W5DXP » Logged

73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
W8JX
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« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2012, 09:24:24 AM »

P.S. I predict that you will be dissatisfied with the performance of a 75m hamstick as it is less than one percent efficient.

Yep. Pretty much a dummy load that leaks a little RF.
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2012, 01:07:11 PM »

 
Quote
"Pretty much a dummy load that leaks a little RF. "
- but you can still have some fun with the leaked RF - an effort toward matching can help. I use a Valor PHF160B on 160M (similar to a hamstick) but feed it with a 12.5 ohm tap on a DX enginering step down transformer, have it on a triple mag mount on a metal roof, with an assortment of counterpoise wires. Its best leak is usually about 1000 miles, but it did get heard in Hawaii once!
Of course, with an inefficient antenna, don't even think about a QRP rig! Put 100W into a 5% efficient antenna, and you're radiating 5W !
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2012, 02:01:06 PM »

P.S. I predict that you will be dissatisfied with the performance of a 75m hamstick as it is less than one percent efficient.

Is the Hustler standard resonator any better?
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AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2012, 02:31:25 PM »

Is the Hustler standard resonator any better?

There's probably not much difference between them at 75meters.  I switched from hamsticks (and clones) on the car to various homebrewed and DXE masts and whips with Hustler resonators, and I've been very pleased with the improvement at 20meters and above.  But even that difference isn't really huge.  At 75m, neither one is going to have a very efficient coil, I think, and you're unlikely to see much difference. 

UNLESS, of course, you put a Hustler RM-40 on a much longer mast than standard, then use a long whip with a capacity hat to resonate on 75m.  That will DEFINITELY improve your performance over a hamstick.  (I'm using an RM-15 on 20m, RM-12 on 15 and 17, with longer mast/whip combinations, and THAT makes a difference, no doubt about it.)  HTH; GL!
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W8JX
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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2012, 02:44:54 PM »

Is the Hustler standard resonator any better?

Standard? Likely not much better if at all but the KW rated version with a larger diameter coil is a little more efficient and has about twice the usable bandwidth as standard on. It does place a lot more wind and mass load of antenna mount.
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KB9BPF
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« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2012, 07:51:19 PM »

Back in the early 2000's in Andersen, Indiana there used to be the 'Dick Perry Memorial Picnic and Shootout." In June 2002 I was the one who got to crawl in and out of vehicles connecting the 'standard' rig to the antennas for testing.

Antennas with big, hi-q coils won. No surprise. Those tended to be grouped together quite closely at the top of the RX strength readings. The next grouping was from smaller screwdrivers like High Sierra and Tarheel. Their RX strength, read on an RF Voltmeter attached to a loop antenna tuned to 3875, was about half the top grouping, so about 6 db down. (We're reading received voltage, not power directly, so half the voltage means 1/4 the power.)

Bringing up the rear, grouped together at about 1/3 to 1/4 the top group, was the Hamsticks and Hustlers. That's 12 to 20 dB down.

I heartily recommend Don Johnson W6AAQ's "HF Mobileering Handbook". Lots of good info in there that can be applied to RF in general, not just antennas.

At one point I enjoyed buying old Hustler coils, stripping off the closewound #18 (?) original windings, and rewinding them with #14. Also used a longer stinger. Turned bad 75M coils into decent 40M coils and mediocre 40M coils into pretty good 20M coils that way. Never did take any to the shootout though.

73,
Brad KB9BPF
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W5DXP
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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2012, 09:31:33 AM »

Is the Hustler standard resonator any better?

At the CA 75m shootouts, the Hustler measured 4 dB better than the hamstick but the Hustler was still 8dB down from the top rated bugcatchers and screwdrivers.

http://www.w5dxp.com/shootout.htm
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
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