Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Radio Havana Cuba and the 120-meter Caribbean band.  (Read 2577 times)
KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 126




Ignore
« on: April 18, 2015, 02:44:54 AM »

 Please don't turn this thread into a political debate or rant, both sides have their doubts and bitternesses, but there is a desire on both sides the heal the past, work together and move forward as demonstrated at the Summit of the Americas.
 Can radio broadcasting between Cuba and the U.S. play a large part of this normalization and positive cultural exchange?
 http://www.radiohc.cu/en/interesantes/estaticas/frecuencias
 I have always enjoyed listening to RHC's DXers Unlimited with Arnie Coro. His broadcasts have always been unbiased, fun and informative. He covers amateur radio subjects like propagation, space weather, tube and solid state hobby projects, new SW stations, antenna building, etc.
 http://www.radiohc.cu/en/especiales/exclusivas/39576-dxers-unlimited-for-sunday-26-october--2014
 Lately I have been unsuccessful at listening to the 120 meter 'tropical' band. I used to get some Caribbean stations playing calypso music (ahh..reminds me of warm sun, white sand and blue water  Grin).
 There is lots of static from electrical storms in the summer months and now the problem is local (neighborhood) RFI 'growl' on the lower frequencies.
 I did go on a DXpedition away from the noise sources last fall to a remote area and was able to receive the 120-meter band with a long, long wire with good results.
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 960




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 04:15:05 PM »

Cuba's national propaganda has not been a show stopper for me. It's quite entertaining. The regular programming is good and I try to catch the latest DXers Unlimited.

Too bad the U.S. doesn't have a real full service national SW broadcaster.
Logged
KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 126




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2015, 04:25:26 AM »

 I don't know if VOA could be considered a 'full service' SW broadcaster. It does offer varied programming, but has been cut back due to budget constraints lately.
 I have heard segments on VOA about international radio broadcasting and the fellowship that international ham radio offers. The language barrier is less than it was now that there is software and 'apps' for that.
 I think that any U.S. SW broadcaster would need to be subsidized as there is just not enough deep pockets out there for a privatized SW station. Some have tried and failed, but their intentions were good.
 The 'fire and brimstone' and 'gold merchant infomercials' I can do without.
 I do like WBCQ's programming during the week. They have discussed work on the station's Harris transmitter and antenna array when they shifted from 7.415 to 7.490 a few years back and have performed maintenance and fine tuning lately. Much of the programming is interesting and non-offensive.
  http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=177
 Glen Hauser's World of Radio did offer a Spanish language 'Mundo Radial' until 2007.
 http://www.worldofradio.com/
 Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show is another SW program that I have enjoyed. They did a show on the grand old boatanchors of yore (which just happens to be my hobby).  Grin
 http://tedrandall.com/pages/home.php
 I have heard ARRL outreach to youth in ham radio. It was on a commercial SW broadcast a couple of years ago and I didn't catch the station name.
 Getting people engaged and talking can only be a good thing.
 
Logged
N0YXB
Member

Posts: 396




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2015, 05:13:24 PM »

Radio Havana has always been one of my favorites.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1782




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2015, 08:41:46 PM »

Radio Havana has always been one of my favorites.
  You can now hear Radio Havana Cuba online at http://www.tunein.com
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 960




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2015, 05:14:57 PM »

Radio Havana has always been one of my favorites.
  You can now hear Radio Havana Cuba online at http://www.tunein.com

Funny thing is that I hear RHC just fine any time. It's WBCQ and VOA that don't come in at all, ever. Total RF Fail.
Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 177




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2015, 10:15:16 AM »

Funny thing is that I hear RHC just fine any time. It's WBCQ and VOA that don't come in at all, ever. Total RF Fail.

VOA's English service is just about gone.  Only one broadcast remains from Greenville:  1730-1830Z on 17785, beamed due east from there.

The others are mostly from Botswana, Sao Tome, & Sri Lanka, with one each from Germany, the Vatican, and Greenville.  All are probably tough to hear in the US, although I have heard the Greenville broadcast in Arizona.

WBCQ beams all their broadcasts at 50 degs (roughly NE) from Monticello, ME -- completely away from the US -- running 50 kW on 5110, 7490, 9330, and/or 15420.

All this is from www.short-wave.info



Logged
N8YX
Member

Posts: 164




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2015, 05:44:42 AM »

...I have always enjoyed listening to RHC's DXers Unlimited with Arnie Coro. His broadcasts have always been unbiased, fun and informative. He covers amateur radio subjects like propagation, space weather, tube and solid state hobby projects, new SW stations, antenna building, etc...
I may or may not have QSL cards from CO2KK from QSOs on several different bands. The "may not" implies I can't remember which shoebox they're tucked away in, but he's definitely in the log.

Interesting individual to talk to on the air.
Logged
AE6RO
Member

Posts: 157




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2015, 08:28:43 AM »

I didn't know RHC had international broadcasts on 120 meters. I used to hear them in English around 60 meters but from SoCal they now are gone.
Anyway, there is so much manmade noise here on 120 meters it's impossible to hear anything else. John
Logged
RENTON481
Member

Posts: 100




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2015, 04:42:13 PM »


VOA's English service is just about gone.  Only one broadcast remains from Greenville:  1730-1830Z on 17785, beamed due east from there.

The others are mostly from Botswana, Sao Tome, & Sri Lanka, with one each from Germany, the Vatican, and Greenville.  All are probably tough to hear in the US, although I have heard the Greenville broadcast in Arizona.

I've heard VOA in English (and other languages, too, from time to time) from Africa a few times over the past year, and I'm in the NW US and only use an indoor wire antenna, so they can be heard. Just depends on propagation.
Logged
K9MOV
Member

Posts: 54




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2015, 04:40:28 PM »

I have an old restored ARC5--Bc-454 set on 6mhz. They come in very well after sundown. They have several frequencies in the 6mhz range that they use. Location is near Chicago.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!