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Author Topic: SMD jig  (Read 6650 times)
9H1FQ
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Posts: 144




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« on: September 13, 2012, 02:21:47 PM »

I am looking for a home made or commercial smd jig to hold an smd component in place for soldering .
Any ideas please
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AC5UP
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2012, 02:36:18 PM »

If you use solder paste with a heat gun a holder isn't necessary... The surface tension of the melted solder will pull the component into alignment.

If you're working with a small tip soldering iron there are several methods to consider: http://www.infidigm.net/articles/solder/

I can tell you from personal experience that it pays to work quickly as some PCB traces can be damaged VERY quickly when heated.
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VK2TIL
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2012, 03:51:29 PM »

Look here;

http://www.users.on.net/~endsodds/sm.htm
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N4NYY
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2012, 05:04:00 PM »

I used a self pinching tweezer.
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KA4POL
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Posts: 1996




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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2012, 09:46:20 PM »

See http://www.g0ghk.co.uk/a-soldering-aid-for-smd-components-by-dave-g3vze
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KE5JPP
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« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2012, 05:01:54 AM »

I am looking for a home made or commercial smd jig to hold an smd component in place for soldering .
Any ideas please

I just use decent tweezers like these http://www.techni-tool.com/352TW011 .  It is 10x faster than all those nonsense hold down methods.

Gene
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KE5JPP
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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2012, 05:07:17 AM »

To keep your sanity I highly recommend investing in a microscope like this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/AmScope-20X-Stereo-Binocular-Microscope-Boom-Arm-Light-/200757834216?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebe1971e8.  It is useful for all kinds of tasks beyond SMT soldering.  Just last night I used the microscope and tweezers to remove a metal splinter from my finger!

If going for a microscope like the one above, look at the magnification range.  I find 5x or 10x the best for SMT soldering.

Gene
« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 05:48:03 AM by KE5JPP » Logged
9H1FQ
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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2012, 03:18:54 PM »

Hi all,

Thanks a lot for the most interesting ideas and suggestions. Never expected such a response.

I did solder many smd components by hand, lens headband, solder paste, liquid flux etc etc, but now  my patience is limited, and I need to do small quantities, I can do with a little help from  a handy aid.

Thanks again all

Paul
9H1FQ
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An unknown gem of the Mediterranean sea is the Island of Malta. blessed with warm sun , all year round.
In just one day, you can see places which will make you travel in history from the Prehistoric temples throu the middle ages, the Knights of Malta, all the way to world war two. All the major civ
KA4POL
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Posts: 1996




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« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2012, 09:34:50 PM »

Good luck with your business. If quantities increase consider having them manufactured in China  Grin
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9H1FQ
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« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2012, 08:03:42 AM »

Hi all
Thanks once again for your response.

Since we are on the subject, how about some ideas about a pcb board holder, or vice, to make it easier to solder !
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An unknown gem of the Mediterranean sea is the Island of Malta. blessed with warm sun , all year round.
In just one day, you can see places which will make you travel in history from the Prehistoric temples throu the middle ages, the Knights of Malta, all the way to world war two. All the major civ
AD6KA
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« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2012, 11:31:11 AM »


Quote
Since we are on the subject, how about some ideas about a pcb board holder, or vice, to make it easier to solder !

If you're going to be doing other projects in
the future, I would invest in something like
the Panavise Circuit Board holder.

http://www.amazon.com/PanaVise-315-Circuit-Board-Holder/dp/B000B5Y99C

The above link is to the model 315, which will
require you to also buy the base. I have this
setup and I just love it. Don't know how I got
by without it before I got one. The "base" vice
is handy for many things also.

I have the base and PC board vice bolted
to a 3/4" piece of plywood about 10" X 20".
I backed that board with felt from a fabric shop.
This way I can put the whole thing on my
desk and solder and work without marring
the finish of my desk.  Cheesy
When I am done with the project/job then the
setup goes into the closet.
Works for me.

For SMD use I like Radio Shack .015" silver
bearing solder. The silver solder isn't needed,
I'm just accustomed to the way it flows. I use
a Weller WTCPT with a 700 degree conical tip.

Good luck with your project.
73 de AD6KA
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W4PAH
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Posts: 67


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2012, 01:27:13 PM »

I built something from fishing weights, a toothpick, some heat-shrink tubing, a couple of pieces of cardboard, and a clothes hanger. Photos can be seen in this album.

https://picasaweb.google.com/105342513599336063298/ATS3BBuild?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCM_40dvqmoqvzAE&feat=directlink

It works quite well, and is very inexpensive. It also doesn't require a machine shop to fabricate.

-john W4PAH
Madison, WI
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W9GB
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Posts: 2623




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« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2012, 02:32:08 PM »

I use a similar setup to Ken, AD6KA.
I use the 5 pound weighted base for my PanaVise holder.

IF you LOOK at PanaVise # 333  -- Rapid Assembly Circuit Board Holder
This is an advanced version for QUICK circuit board ROTATION and component insertion/soldering.
http://www.panavise.com/index.html?id1=1&id2=8&startat=1&--woSECTIONSdatarq=8&--SECTIONSword=ww

This is the best PanaVise bench tool for small production ...
nothing beats this work holding tool for its Speed and Versatility.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2012, 02:36:52 PM by W9GB » Logged
VK2TIL
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Posts: 328




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« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2012, 05:33:55 PM »

For through-hole PCBs, I have a Weller PCB holder ( http://shop.rabtron.co.za/catalog/images/Weller%20Soldering%20-%20Weller%20PCB%20holder%20ESF130.jpg ) and a General Tools vise ( http://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-1850-Swivel-Vacuum/dp/B00004T7TH ). 

But the OP asked about SMD; the ability to invert the PCB is not required there.

Here is my setup;

http://i48.tinypic.com/ehk8ib.jpg

It shows most of my tools; microscope with ring light, tweezers, skewer, scalpel, Exacto knife etc.

I open component tapes over the shiny pan; you can hear them fall into it and they are easily seen and picked-up from it.

The PCB sits on a mouse mat that gives a little "grip"; the PCB spacers seen here are used as "legs" because this is a double-sided board.

 

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N4CR
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Posts: 1668




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« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2012, 06:59:46 PM »

These are nice and don't get in the way of working on the board.

http://www.qrpkits.com/pcbvise.html

Looks like they are out of stock right now though.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
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