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Author Topic: Hard work..  (Read 6353 times)
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2012, 07:18:09 PM »

ooh rah!  Grin

all 26 letters, and two numbers  at 10wpm... Wish I had discovered the Koch method a LOOONG time ago!! I'm making progress by leaps and bounds now Smiley

i eased off of my goal of 13wpm.. I'm more excited about being able to do 90%+ copy on the entire character set Smiley

10 is just easing out of my comfort zone.. so I'll be pushing that back up soon enough.
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2012, 05:35:23 AM »

Very good,

When you know the footprint of a rubber stamp QSO, just answer  a CQ on the band you can transmit. Your first QSO you never forget.

I remember as a boy just ringing the front door bell at houses registered as ham addresses and asking to see the transmitter. One guy SK for a long time already, showed me all his home brew equipment, let a bike behind light (tailing light) burn on a copper loop 1 ft diameter, in the neighborhood of his final tank circuit, and I wanted to be a ham. He told me I had to learn Morse code, and so on. I got from him a few overtime world and USA call books with a horse in frontcover, and an Iron core to produce by home brew a mains transformer for the power supply.  After three months I got my full license, and he and his ham friends were amazed, because they learned slower due to higher age. In their eyes I was a genius, I remember.  I presented myself again at the same address, before I had build my own transmitter which was compulsory after obtaining a call, and he gave me the key. I did not know anything about rubber stamp QSOs so after exchanging calls with some rare prefix, I don't remember,something went wrong. I don't remember what, over 65 yrs ago.

Nowadays I am ashamed to admit to be a ham. Why? Because it are "proud" appliance operators, with bought equipment, not even able to repair the stuff, Hams advertise themself as "friendship and understanding between nations" but even at this website chapter Stayvertical and K8AXW announced they don't talk anymore to me, because I am a person, not some hound of the Baskervilles that matches to their desires with my behavior.

How sad, You bet

« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 05:58:32 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2012, 07:10:01 PM »

i added the top 100 most used words, and the 2nd top 100 most used words to the word file..

did some 'endurance' runs with the words file.. that makes it a little more challenging!  I can solid copy up to about 8wpm.. when it makes to transition to 9wpm it starts to get tough... (which it should do)  and I can _JUST_ barely handle 10 :>


I'm looking forward to pushing myself on those Smiley

btw.. in an endurance run, the program starts out at the predefined start speed which right now is set at 5pm with 15wpm character speed.  then every 20 characters I get right, it bumps the speed up another 1wpm.  to the max I have set at 15
if i miss a character, it drops back to the starting speed and starts over. and keeps going until I stop it.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3773




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« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2012, 08:37:27 PM »

Tim:  Sounds like you're doing fine.  Just stay at a speed you can comfortably copy and practice at that speed.  This is the time for accuracy and not speed. 

Once you get that speed down where you can copy close to 100%, then move up a couple wpm and stay there until you're close to 100% again. 

Note that I said "close to 100%."  You can drive yourself nuts trying to achieve 100% and for no reason. 

Just continue the practice each day and don't fly it into the ground.  Too much practice can hinder you and also it becomes "hard work" which you have titled your thread.  This should be fun!!

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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2012, 02:33:50 AM »

I disagree,

As far as I know: Every QRQ proficient guy can tell you, that in order to speed up, the fastest way is trying to copy 10% faster then you are able to do. When you then go back 9% lower, hence to the old top speed, it turns out it looks slow and is much easier to copy then it was. That works till you find your personal max, which is hard to break.

That is also my personal experience.

Exercising with code groups, has hardly sense, because you want to conversate in plain language and CW abbreviations, and comprehend what you hear. Code groups are used at championships in order to prevent advantage of being acquainted with  a language the messages are sent.

Because code groups were used for encryption the meaning was lost and accuracy was mandatory.

So when you sent a long word and make is mistake in the start: repeat it completely, when you make a mistake in the middle, no problem.  When immediately is meant and you sent immedaitly: hardly or no problem at all.

Bob
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2012, 04:55:59 AM »

Congrats on your great progress!  One thing about it is that when you are working on something you love, it is not like work.  Listen to on-air QSOs, even if they are faster than you can copy, and you will benefit from listening to the rhythm and tempo.  You will get a few characters here and there, and will find that slower code will be easier for you to hear.  I would also listen to the exchanges and callsigns during contests.  It won't matter what you can't copy, but it will matter that you are training your ear.  Listen to the novice section on 40m, and don't forget to work on your sending.  Having a good fist is as important as having a good ear.  You are going to do just fine, my friend.
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2012, 05:21:07 AM »

Another thing:

You are damned right: HARD WORKING.

When you plan something to do that is not compulsory, ( like your job)  because you want to obtain the planned result. it is NO FUN. May be when you just start, and overexercise, and stop after a short time, because it is not fun anymore. That is the bulk of hams announcing right here the are GOING TO learn Morse code. Those guys are always GOING TO, never finish something they plan voluntarily because it must be fun.

The price you pay when you want to reach a chosen goal is that you will exercise perseverance without fun.

Not doing it for a while (Dutch translated saying : for A blue Monday) and stopping when it is no more fun.

When you start a large home brew project, I assure  you, (because without doubt you are an appliance operator) that you start up with fun, but you get other ideas, for "in between" and the final result is your home brewing project (not a kit, a kit is for kids) will end up in the walk in closet filled up with "Unvollendetes". That is because a temporarily abandoned project, you forget about the undocumented  particularities. So this never happens me (again) but I know where I am talking about.

Not so the ex militarians that were (no fun but as a young man taking the contract for the premium, you need a life after dropping out of school) hired for a shift of 8 hours a day to copy reliable number stations, that stations were just put in the air, by the supposed enemy, to keep them busy. They are boosting right here that the monitoring stations couldn't copy them. Ridiculous self esteem, because the opposite is true. The east Europeans were sometimes slowing down and sending the text that that "it was to easier copying for the west monitoring stns".

Right now, when you watch the speeds and the population exercising Morse code, you can easily conclude about the eastern supremacy in Morse code proficiency.  Clever idea, in my opinion because when in the future there should be some weaponed clash, all the communication satellites will be shot out of orbit within one minute, and Morse code could be alive just as 100 years ago, and the Western people are nowhere, because it was no fun to exceed 5 wpm. I assure you: It is even for the average ham a rampage to communicate with 5 wpm.

Bob
« Last Edit: September 27, 2012, 05:24:33 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
AG6WT
Member

Posts: 443




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« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2012, 07:13:16 AM »

i added the top 100 most used words, and the 2nd top 100 most used words to the word file..

did some 'endurance' runs with the words file.. that makes it a little more challenging!  I can solid copy up to about 8wpm.. when it makes to transition to 9wpm it starts to get tough... (which it should do)  and I can _JUST_ barely handle 10 :>


I'm looking forward to pushing myself on those Smiley

btw.. in an endurance run, the program starts out at the predefined start speed which right now is set at 5pm with 15wpm character speed.  then every 20 characters I get right, it bumps the speed up another 1wpm.  to the max I have set at 15
if i miss a character, it drops back to the starting speed and starts over. and keeps going until I stop it.


Tim

I think I'm about where you are, just passed character #26 with characters sent at 20 wpm and a Farnsworth spacing to get an effective rate of 10 wpm. My goal is to sustain 10 wpm so I can have converse with the elmers in my club who host a slow cw net. Ideally they go 10-20 wpm.

When I get a new character my strategy has been to lower the rate to 7-8 wpm until I get a near perfect copy of about 2 minutes worth of text. Once I reach that threshold I bump it up to 10 wpm and work on it until I get +90% copy of 2 minutes worth of text then I add the next character. Right now 10 wpm is pretty tough for me and I think it will be a while before I can move up to 12-15 wpm.

But I wonder if I'm taking the wrong strategy by starting slow and increasing my speed. Perhaps I should be starting faster, above my target wpm, when learning. I was reading "The Art and Skill of Radio-Telegraphy" last night and the author, William Pierpont N0HFF, recommends starting each practice session with a high rate and just try to get 50-75% copy. You do this at the beginning of your practice session when your brain is fresh. Then as you fatigue you lower the rate. After having tried to copy code that is uncomfortably fast, your target rate should seem leisurely.

I haven't tried this yet but I suspect this is the key, at least for me. I noticed that when I'm in the slow cw net, I can't copy well the 15-20 wpm guys, I can only make out letters here and there, perhaps a complete word at most. But then shortly after I go back to my Koch program, and 10 wpm seems pretty easy.

N0HFF also recommends not to do endurance runs, at least early on, but to do a series of short bursts of 1-2 minutes at the higher speeds.

73
Ray KJ6AMF
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3773




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« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2012, 09:01:47 AM »

Tim:  AMF is correct...... I didn't include similar comments in my post because I wanted to be brief as possible.

It is always good to copy for accuracy before moving on to the next speed, but while learning accuracy it's always good to include a session of copy where the speed is faster than you can copy 100%.  When you do come back to your comfort speed it will seem slower.

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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2012, 09:13:04 AM »

Tim:  AMF is correct...... I didn't include similar comments in my post because I wanted to be brief as possible.

It is always good to copy for accuracy before moving on to the next speed, but while learning accuracy it's always good to include a session of copy where the speed is faster than you can copy 100%.  When you do come back to your comfort speed it will seem slower.



Yes AMF is correct and BLAH, posting before AMF and saying to disagree with you, is also correct.

Bob
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