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Author Topic: Which has the least menu options?  (Read 2380 times)
N2UGB
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Posts: 179




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« on: November 01, 2012, 01:52:22 AM »

I am thinking of getting another rig. This time one with the least buried menus. My FT-857 is a good rig but I would prefer less of those buried menus. Other than a QRP Altoids, which would you recommend?

73 Dick
N2UGB/F8WBD

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VE7REN
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Posts: 469




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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2012, 04:27:04 AM »

the ts480 is a very intuitive radio....look at it.

ve7ren brent
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2012, 05:23:45 AM »

In general, not having menus means not having features. Menus only become a problem when they put often used features into them.
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AG6WT
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Posts: 453




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« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2012, 05:45:26 AM »

I am thinking of getting another rig. This time one with the least buried menus. My FT-857 is a good rig but I would prefer less of those buried menus. Other than a QRP Altoids, which would you recommend?

73 Dick
N2UGB/F8WBD



You have to narrow the selection down a bit. Are you only interested in mobile sized radios? Do you need VHF/UHF?

In my opinion, the FT-857/897 radios have a pretty poor interface. I found the FT-897 nested menus annoying and I never got comfortable with it; I always had to have the manual handy and any change seemed to require 10 or more key presses. Yaesu could have done better. They have done better! I have a FT-100D, the predecessor to the FT-857 and it's much easier to navigate.

If you can get a full sized desktop radio, it will almost certainly have an easier to use menu system as most settings are adjusted directly with knobs and buttons and the menu system is usually only one level deep.

As Brent suggested, the TS-480 is one to consider as well as other Kenwoods. They do a pretty good job with their menu designs and as you can see, they cram a lot of buttons and knobs on their radios so they are very easy to use without a manual.

Ray KJ6AMF
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WX7G
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« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2012, 06:23:39 AM »

I have an Elecraft K3 and once it is set up (via menus) I don't have to fool around with them again.

I also have an FT-857 in the car that is so quite menu intensive. Today it gets replaced by a TS-480 that I'm expecting to be easier to use.
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NA0AA
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« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2012, 07:12:26 AM »

The Yaesu 2000, 5000, 9000's are all control intensive radios.  Because they are so complex they also have a huge menu but once set up you rarely use them.

I imagine there are others but I'm familiar with the Yaesu.

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VE3FMC
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« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2012, 12:44:18 PM »

I have a Yaseu FT-950. Yes there are many menu items on this rig.

However once you have the radio setup to the way you want to operate you are good to go. About the only menu I access daily is the power setting. I have that setup so I can access it by the CS button. Push that button, adjust the power level with the CLAR/VFO B control and then push the MENU button until you hear the two beeps and that is done.

I have the MIC EQ setup and have never changed it.

So yes it has many menus but as I said once you have it set up you are done with it.

I doubt there are many new rigs without menus. Unless you go back to the hybrid rigs  Grin And there is nothing wrong with those rigs, they still sound great on the air after all of those years.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2012, 01:46:07 PM »

I like the way Ten Tec did it on the Jupiter, Orion, OMNI-VII and Orion II.

These rigs all have TFT screens so they can display a lot of stuff.  You push MENU and your options are displayed filling the screen, and all written in plain English, no codes or really even abbreviations.  No need to refer to the manual, since everything displayed there is plain English and tells you what it is.  Turn the main tuning (VFO) knob to highlight the one you want to select, then turn one knob to change that, then hit MENU again to revert back to the normal display screen.

You can do it while working someone, either listening or transmitting, as the MENU doesn't interrupt anything you're doing, or change anything either, until you intentionally change it.

With the T-T stuff, I've never looked at the manual. Wink  So, there's nothing to "remember" and there's no reason to open a book.

This can really only be done with a large screen, but several rigs have those and I have no idea why they don't all implement the same friendly user interface.  It's remarkably simple.
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STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2012, 01:54:30 PM »

One thing which has made my life much easier with menu-rich radios is to hook up a P.C.
For example if you use HRD or other radio control program, the menu system becomes your friend, not foe.
In addition, you don't have to battle a small LCD screen.

I know this adds a P.C. to the mix, but a notebook on the operating desk is almost as common as a microphone these days.

If you decide to go this route, what you would want to consider is what functions are accessible by remote control.
In general not all functionality of the radio is necessarily available by remote control.
Some are better than others on this score.
For example, the FT897D does not allow changing filters (as far as I could see) by remote control, while the FT817ND does.
With remote control becoming more common on new radio's the functions available could be important.

Just adding a little wrinkle to the question for your consideration.

73 - Rob
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M6GOM
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Posts: 915




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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2012, 02:02:45 PM »

Kenwood TS480, Kenwood TS590.

If you really don't want much in the way of menus you need to start looking at older stuff - Kenwood TS850, Yaesu FT990, Icom 775 type.
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M5AEO
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Posts: 270




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« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2012, 02:11:21 PM »

Can I suggest the Yaesu FT-920: it has a button or knob for everything.  A joy to operate!

Jonathan, M5AEO.

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NO2A
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« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2012, 02:18:02 PM »

The Kenwood`s have always been very user friendly. Most menu choices are set and forget. If you don`t want any menues,go back to a TS-450S,440S,430S,140S,130S,120S,etc.
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W1JKA
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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2012, 02:33:14 PM »

     If you want easy read ICOM 7200 reviews.That's why I have one.  Jim
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WD8DKB
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Posts: 181




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« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2012, 07:58:24 PM »

If you want a really simple  menu system, the Ten Tec Jupiter is really simple. I have owned one now for over 3 years. There are no hidden or sub menus. You push the menu button and bingo, the whole menu is right there. Use the tuning knob to scroll down to what you want to change and do so with the multi-knob. Tap the menu button again and your back home. I also own the Icom IC-7200. It's menu system is very easy to work with. Not quite as easy as the Jupiter, but very easy to use. And- the 7200 DSP features are better implemented than the Jupiter. But that is due to new advancements in that technology. Also, it has 6 meters on it. I purchased 2 IC-7200s over the last 6 months or so on the used market. You can pick one up for $750 in excellent condition. The lack of an internal antenna tuner is nothing really. Outboard auto or manual tuners are generally much more versatile and not expensive. And they generally have a much broader range than a built in tuner.
  Just my personal opinion.  73 and have a great time on the bands.  Max
     
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N2UGB
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2012, 01:51:38 AM »

Thanks for all the solid advice and recommendations. I have some experience with Ten-Tec gear having had, let's see, three Argonauts and two early Omnis. I just might take a look at that last Ten-Tec recommended. Maybe a reconditioned used one. But that will have to wait until spring when I return to the States.

Thanks and 73
Dick
N2UGB/F8WBD
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