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Author Topic: New Ham Radio Book  (Read 7523 times)
W5ZL
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2012, 09:41:19 AM »

The English grammar rules are there to be used by those that desire their works to be admired and given credit.  After perusing over the first two paragraphs of his work, I too wondered how much credit could be attributed to the technical portion of his writings after noticing his terrible attempt at the use of English Grammar.

As he did, I too graduate from High School and after attending schools of higher learning for 9.5 years, I attained a Terminal Degree in Mathematics, which required writing a dissertation and defending it before a Major Professor and three of his collages.  At one time, I did possess the skills to correctly write the English Language; but over the years of hearing the English Language “butchered” by the so-called educated, I too have become lax in my writings habits.  However, I haven’t deteriorated so far in my old age so as to try to begin to understand your misuse of the rules of English grammar.

Just because you don’t ascribe to the current rules in writing the English language and follow the established rules of grammar that I will change enough to accept your kludge of words and their meaning.

Think about this, what would our "written word" look like today if everyone that were to write an article decided to use sentence structure that “Sounds Good to Him”, in the article he wrote.  That is one of the main reasons that people don’t speak and write the English Language correctly is because they have heard it “butchered” to death by those that don’t know how to correctly use it.

I bid you the best of luck in your writings and that you attain whatever it is that you aspire to be.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5885




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« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2012, 05:19:28 AM »

Re:K1CJS
                Does your" through" mean thorough?

Yeah, it does.  I guess I rely on the spell checker too much.  It does catch spelling errors unless the word used is spelled correctly--but not for the intended usage!
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KI4JGT
Member

Posts: 114




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« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2012, 08:10:32 AM »

The English grammar rules are there to be used by those that desire their works to be admired and given credit.  After perusing over the first two paragraphs of his work, I too wondered how much credit could be attributed to the technical portion of his writings after noticing his terrible attempt at the use of English Grammar.

As he did, I too graduate from High School and after attending schools of higher learning for 9.5 years, I attained a Terminal Degree in Mathematics, which required writing a dissertation and defending it before a Major Professor and three of his collages.  At one time, I did possess the skills to correctly write the English Language; but over the years of hearing the English Language “butchered” by the so-called educated, I too have become lax in my writings habits.  However, I haven’t deteriorated so far in my old age so as to try to begin to understand your misuse of the rules of English grammar.

Just because you don’t ascribe to the current rules in writing the English language and follow the established rules of grammar that I will change enough to accept your kludge of words and their meaning.

Think about this, what would our "written word" look like today if everyone that were to write an article decided to use sentence structure that “Sounds Good to Him”, in the article he wrote.  That is one of the main reasons that people don’t speak and write the English Language correctly is because they have heard it “butchered” to death by those that don’t know how to correctly use it.

I bid you the best of luck in your writings and that you attain whatever it is that you aspire to be.


http://captain.park.edu/jglauner/EN-ED325%20Online/Research%20Paper%20Sample/evolution_of_english_grammar.htm
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5885




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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2012, 05:01:53 AM »

One other point here--You've got to wonder about how some people will misspell words and butcher the English language--and then how they'll come back, when corrected, with this retort:  "You know what I meant, so why should I care?"

All too often, the schools are cramming knowledge into our young peoples heads--and ignoring the simple but the inescapable fact that the basics are being forgotten.  It used to be that spelling, grammar and penmanship used to be necessary parts of an education.  Today, however, they're forgotten arts that are all but totally left out of a person's grade school learning--especially penmanship!
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2532




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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2012, 06:52:54 AM »

Quote
It used to be that ... penmanship used to be necessary parts of an education.

Yep, and kids went to hell around the time liberal educators replaced Greek with Latin.  

"In order to be admitted to Cornell, students were expected to have considerable knowledge of Latin and Greek. The 1875 catalogue, for example, required Greek and Latin prose composition, two books of Xenophon's Anabasis (in Greek), and in Latin four books of Caesar's Commentaries (on the Gallic Wars) and six orations of Cicero. It was not until 1916 that knowledge of Greek and Latin was waived for admission to the Bachelor of Arts degree."
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AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1236




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« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2012, 03:09:30 PM »

of Latin and Greek. The 1875 catalogue, for example, required Greek and Latin prose composition, two books of Xenophon's Anabasis (in Greek), and in Latin four books of Caesar's Commentaries (on the Gallic Wars) and six orations of Cicero. It was not until 1916 that knowledge of Greek and Latin was waived for admission to the Bachelor of Arts degree."[/i]

My father was one of seven children born to a Pennsylvania farm family; he went to college in 1948--only the second person in the family to go to college.  And in his rural high school, he learned to read Latin well enough to read Caesar--he still remembers a lot of it 65 years later.  My wife's former high-school students complained because they were asked to read and write simple English, instead of "text-speak." 
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W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1619




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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2012, 02:45:00 AM »

     eye whent two coledge too becum and inglisch mayjer,now Iam won.
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2532




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« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2012, 06:28:29 AM »

English? Forget zat!

Recently released photo of Einstein's office on the day he died in 1955 shows his penmanship and organizational skills. We also learn that he had no motivational posters (of himself perhaps) on his walls Smiley

Only his beloved pipe seems purposely positioned when the fourth dimension caught up with him.
http://timelifeblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/001151110.jpg?w=497
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3683




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« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2012, 07:04:44 AM »

JKA: 
Quote
now Iam won
  No, no no..... it's "now I ARE one!"   Roll Eyes
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W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1619




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« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2012, 07:22:24 AM »

oops
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5885




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« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2012, 07:46:46 AM »

Quote
It used to be that ... penmanship used to be necessary parts of an education.

Yep, and kids went to hell around the time liberal educators replaced Greek with Latin.  

"In order to be admitted to Cornell, students were expected to have considerable knowledge of Latin and Greek....

You're not seriously equating the knowledge of Greek and Latin to the ability to legibly write words on paper, are you?  You've got to be kidding! 

However, if the reason that you posted that is that you're considering Greek, Latin and Penmanship all lost arts, then I agree with you. 
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WA4D
Member

Posts: 99


WWW

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« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2012, 02:05:30 PM »

Surely the most bland rhetoric I've seen lately. And Ham Radio publications as a whole can generally be categorized as "bland".

Writing is hard. If it was easy, we could all write best sellers.

I saw nothing in this draft that was engaging, stimulating or intellectually interesting.  Indeed, writing  on "technical" subjects is among the hardest areas of all, to make interesting. An example of Technical Subject writer of note: Wes Simpson. (Video over IP).   He's outstanding.

As W5FYI noted, Shrader and Orr are the standard for serious hams.

Give it up KI4--- You may have other talents. But writing on this subject is not one of them. Don't waste your time.

Mike/WA4D.Net
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2765




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« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2012, 06:34:02 PM »

http://www.workableweb.com/_pages/tips_how_to_write_good.htm

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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5885




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« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2012, 06:27:05 AM »

Good thing this guy wrote about a satirical piece when he wrote that last referenced article.  An informational piece about writing articles and stories the proper way should be titled "How to write WELL."  But you know that already....  Never mind!
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2765




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« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2012, 10:40:51 AM »

Written by P. J. O'Rourke.  First time I saw it was in an old issue of National Lampoon.  You can be sure he knew what he was doing when he wrote "good".
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
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