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Author Topic: Least menu driven good radio  (Read 15533 times)
N3JJT
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2012, 04:51:27 PM »

Hello Jay!  I would have to say the Ten Tec Eagle.   A very simple rig, no hidden menus.  There is a "Function" button, and this button enables the 2nd half of the dual purpose buttons.  Everything that is set on the radio, is visible on the display.  Go to the Ten Tec website, and view the manual.  Like, Ken has said:  The IC718 is also an easy radio to operate.

Good Luck!  Scott  N3JJT
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2012, 11:29:14 PM »

Boy, a Ten Tec Corsair II would be really good here.  Find one with a good PTO and a 500Hz CW filter and you'd be pretty much set.  Check out the reviews.
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NK7Z
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« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2012, 07:27:36 AM »

To simplify, Yeasu's seem to be most menu defendant for many functions in their class with Icom nearly the same and Kenwood is the least menu dependent for normal functions but they all have menus.
Hi,

I use and like the Icom 756 Pro III...  I am in the menus very seldom after initial setup, in fact I am in the menus almost none unless I am changing something basic, like default filter BW, etc.  The radio does not use menus for day to day operation at all.  Performance is great, looks are great, and a used one is getting less expensive...

The menus for the Pro III are really used to set the defaults of various things for the most part.  Once set the front buttons do all the rest.  I was able to sit at the radio the first time, and be able to operate it with no issues, having not looked at the manual.  After looking at the manual I have discovered many little tricks it does, and all without getting into a series of menus.

See if you can locate someone with a 756 PRO III, go play with it.  You will like it!

73's,
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
K8AC
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Posts: 1477




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« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2012, 08:42:40 AM »

I think the real problem most folks have with the menu systems is that it's just too difficult to remember which menu items do what and it's cumbersome to have to plow through the manual (and some of those do a poor job of explaining menu items) when you need to change something quickly.  I discovered a good solution for any rig with menus: the Nifty Mini-Manual sold by N6FN.  These manuals are tailored to each rig model and are organized in such a way that if you know what you're trying to accomplish, you'll find a clear and concise explanation of how to do it.  The manuals are small, spiral-bound with plastic coated pages.  I have no connection whatever to the publisher of these manuals, other than having bought one for each of the past several rigs I've owned. 


73, Floyd - K8AC
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HB9PJT
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Posts: 274


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« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2012, 04:50:24 AM »

Kenwood TS-590.

Day by day use without menue. The menue is for some presetting. Very easy to handle. And very good manual with easy expenations.

73, Peter - HB9PJT
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W4FID
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Posts: 137




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« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2012, 03:17:05 AM »

It's not new .......... but it works beautifully and is as easy as it gets. I love my Kenwood TS-50. Simple enough and easy/large enough display to be safe mobile. Has a good CW filter in it. I get great reports. Used it mobile in the SUV, with poor antennas in parks and campgrounds, hard on field days ........... it does the job well in all cases.
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K5TED
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Posts: 780




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« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2012, 06:46:05 PM »

I'd be enchanted with a modern transceiver around the size of a HQ-170A, with similar widely spaced layout, but plenty of controls. Replace the analog bandspread, tuning dial and meter area with a nice OLED screen, all filter indicators, metering, etc. right there on the screen at all times, in color. Oh, yes, it'll have to be a SDR inside. No menus unless I choose to use the PC interface... Make it out of Aluminum and steel, too.
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WB5PGX
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2013, 06:31:32 PM »

If they make retro cars (mustang, camaro, charger, etc) , then we could have retro radios. A Collins kwm2 look a like with solid state final, digital and analog readout, and an antenna tuner.
Don't forget to have an old style s meter and big knobs for fat fingers, no menus and great audio with no dsp corruption. And a switch to turn the digital read out off to where you only used it for occasional frequency calibration. I would pay a premium for such a radio. Anybody out there agree?
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2013, 01:28:27 PM »

I'll toss in another vote for the 746/746 pro. I rarely ever need to touch the menu. Power control, keyer speed, split, band, etc can all be done directly from the front panel. I had the opportunity to borrow a menu driven rig for a while and it drove me bonkers to have to constantly be in and out of the menu for changing power/ keyer speed. The 746 / 746pro is a pretty good radio and you can pick them up at a decent price.
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NW0LF
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2013, 06:13:12 PM »

Throwing in my 2 cents, either a Kenwood TS-850 or TS-940.  Knobs and buttons for everything.  Typical excellent Kenwood receive and transmit audio and both look cool together on the desk.  I also have an ICOM 706 with a LDG IT-100 ATU.  I like it, but for ease of use, I'll take the 2 Kenwoods.

73
"Wolfie", NW0LF
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WB6DGN
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Posts: 619




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« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2013, 03:48:42 PM »

Quote
Don't forget to have an old style s meter and big knobs for fat fingers...

Yeah!  I always liked big knobs too!
Tom
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N0NZG
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Posts: 127




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« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2013, 08:57:37 PM »

I second the vote for the TS-590 and if you are looking for a cheaper rig TS570 series is hard to beat with a close second the TS480 series. All three have a very simple menu that lets you set any basic  item with out any sub sub sub menus. You can buy a TS570 all day long for $500 to $750, and the are excellent performers with lots of knobs and VERY simple intuitive operation. I have always liked radios that I didn’t have to learn to operate. I have a TS570D that goes with me to the lake and I love it, because the internal tuner seams to be able to match a 100 foot inverted vee on all bands except 160.
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F8WBD
Member

Posts: 77




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« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2013, 01:30:52 AM »

Late viewing this and you probably have your rig by now. Would have suggested a TS-520 series no menus at all but you must dip/load. Best is a QRP rig such as OHR, etc. The KX3 and new Argonaut do have menus.

My OHR100A and HW-8 are simplicity itself.
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