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Author Topic: Correct 240 plug for Ameritron als-600 (linear PS)  (Read 3726 times)
WB2JVB
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Posts: 3




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« on: November 27, 2012, 06:29:42 AM »

I picked up an ALS-600PS (not SPS) here on eham. Have not received it yet, but am having an electrician do some work in my office. While he is there I am having him run a 240 circuit for the amp. I don't have enough 110 amperage anyway, so had to get a new line anyway. Figure I will be set for bigger amps in the future (hihi).

So, what is the correct plug/outlet to use. I read the owners guide on Ameritron's site, but did not find that info. I need to tell the electrician what type of outlet to put in. Or is this something obvious he would know. Seems like there are a ton of different types of 240 outlets.

Thanks for your help!

Paul
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N4RSS
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Posts: 258




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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2012, 06:44:31 AM »

I had NEMA 6-20R installed for mine.  Plug is 6-20P.  20 amp breaker should do it since the amplifier should draw no more than 5 amps
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N5VTU
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2012, 06:46:29 AM »

Your electrician will probably know, but for my AL-80A, I use the standard  NEMA 6-20R, which is rated at 20A.

Stephen
N5VTU
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K2CMH
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Posts: 275




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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2012, 07:06:23 AM »

From the factory, the power cord does not have a plug on it, you have to put one on it, so you get to choose.  However, it sounds like you got one used so it probably already has a plug on it.  I would ask the previous owner which style plug he put on it and then find the mating part at Home Depot or such.
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W9GB
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2012, 08:33:05 AM »

Quote from: WB2JVB
So, what is the correct plug/outlet to use. I read the owners guide on Ameritron's site, but did not find that info. I need to tell the electrician what type of outlet to put in. Or is this something obvious he would know. Seems like there are a ton of different types of 240 outlets.
Paul -

In North America, receptacles and plugs are now standardized in usage (since 1970, with additions in 1996) by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector
NEMA 5–15R is the standard 120 VAC, 15 amp electricity outlet found in every household
and building in the United States.

GRAPHICAL DRAWING of COMMON PLUGS/RECEPTACLES in US HOMES.
NEMA Simplified
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NEMA_simplified_pins.svg

For 240 VAC, you use the NEMA 6 connector standard (250 Volt, 2-Pole, 3-Wire Grounding)
for straight-line plugs and receptacles in residential installations.

As stated earlier, a NEMA 6-20R receptacle, with the "T blade" option,
installed and inspected by your licensed electrician will accept 240 VAC appliances (HF amplifiers)
with a NEMA 6-15P (15 amp) or NEMA 6-20P (20 amp) plug.
This proper installation provides the maximum flexibility (future amp upgrade) for your radio shack.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector#NEMA_6
==
NEVER ASSUME AC WIRING WITH USED HF AMPLIFIER PURCHASES !!

Personally, I would INSTALL a New NEMA 6-15P on the Ameritron ALS-600 amplifier AFTER you assure it is correctly jumpered and wired at transformer for 240 VAC.
The Ameritron ALS-600 Manual has this information.

Your electrician can assist you with proper wiring of the NEMA 6-15P plug
to the Ameritron AC power cord (flexible cord, appliance cord).
The ALS-600 power cord will use either the NEMA/North America colors (BLK-WHI-GRN) OR
the EU Standard colors (BROWN-BLUE-GREEN or GREEN with YELLOW TRACER).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_wiring#Color_code

Assuming a USA flexible cord for 240 VAC plug wiring:
The BLACK wire goes to L1 (first hot lead).
The WHITE wire should be marked RED (heat shrink) and attached to L2 (second hot lead).
In this instance, 240 VAC wiring, this is the second phase / HOT LEAD.
GREEN must ALWAYS be attached to the SAFETY GROUND screw/lug.  

For 240 VAC 3-Wire Grounding -- the SAFETY GROUND it is there to save your life.

w9gb
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 09:11:15 AM by W9GB » Logged
W8JX
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Posts: 5470




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« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2012, 09:56:49 AM »

Personally, I would INSTALL a New NEMA 6-15P on the Ameritron ALS-600 amplifier AFTER you assure it is correctly jumpered and wired at transformer for 240 VAC.

I agree. Bigger is not better. Any amp running at legal limits can easily run on a 240v 15smp circuit. If you need more you are running far more than legal limit.
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WB2JVB
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2012, 01:07:58 PM »

You guys are the best! Super info, exactly what I needed, and timely as the electrician is coming tomorrow morning to estimate it. I am pretty good at 110 wiring, but feel better having this one done by him. Its a fairly long run from the panel to the ham shack too, better him than me in the crawlspaces!!

Paul
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W9GB
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Posts: 2599




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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2012, 05:57:25 PM »

Quote
It is a fairly long run from the main electrical panel to the ham shack.
Better him (electrician), than me for fishing the cabling through the crawlspaces!!
Paul -

Another important "tidbit" you just mentioned.
To reduce voltage drop, your Electrician will likely use the next largest AWG (American Wire Gauge).  
A 20 amp, 240 VAC circuit of relatively short distance would typical use 12 or 10 AWG.
IF the cable run is over 50 feet, he will have to determine if 10 or 8 AWG is suitable.

Larger electrical contractors today have many neat toys (RC cars, slingshots, air bazookas)
 for fishing non-metallic (NM) sheath cable wire (or flexible conduit).
... and you thought we had all the fun during Field Day fishing rope for wire antennas in trees.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 06:00:32 PM by W9GB » Logged
W8JX
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Posts: 5470




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« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2012, 07:02:07 PM »

Another important "tidbit" you just mentioned.
To reduce voltage drop, your Electrician will likely use the next largest AWG (American Wire Gauge).  A 20 amp, 240 VAC circuit of relatively short distance would typical use 12 or 10 AWG.
IF the cable run is over 50 feet, he will have to determine if 10 or 8 AWG is suitable.

This is actually far less concern with 240v because while 5 volt drop on 120 can cause a problems, on 240 the same drop has much less effect.
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W1QJ
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2012, 05:27:46 AM »

All the "short run" amplifier 240 vac circuits I run I use #12 wire and a 6-20P outlet.  MANY amps only need 15A circuits, but it cost little more to run a 20A circuit using #12 wire and putting in a 6-20P outlet.  The reason why I prefer the 6-20P outlet is because it will receive either a 15 or 20 amp plug.  The 15A plug has 2 side ways blades and the 20A plug has one sideways and one vertical.  The 20P outlet will receive both.  Some larger amps use the 20A plug.  You should always think about expansion when you are a ham or an electrician.  I don't know how long the run is to your breaker panel but in the length up to 50 to 70 feet #12  wire will be fine.  If you have a very long run you might want to go to #10 but that might be overkill on a short run.  Even though the amp may only draw 5 amps, you may some day want a big Ameritron Al-1500 which you would want that 20 amp circuit for.
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W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2012, 11:52:52 AM »

I am using 14/3 on a 35 foot run for a 240v 15 amp circuit.  Amp is a Dentron Clipperton QRO with 4ea 572's.  It peaks at 11 amps when pushed to limit but I very rarely do that. Wire size is not as critical with 240 as 120 for voltage drop tolerance.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2012, 12:34:40 PM »

as long as he is there, have him run a second pair of wires, for a couple of 110 volt circuits, its just pulling another wire together with the 220 line, and it will give you 2 dedicated 110 outlets for  radios and leave the  rest of the outlets in the shack for other non radio uses. 
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