Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Leadership styles in clubs...  (Read 47257 times)
AC2EU
Member

Posts: 361


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2013, 10:31:52 PM »


If there aren't volunteers, I would think that's a de facto vote of the membership that they don't want a Hamfest...


Yes, I suppose that's true, but why doesn't anybody step up and make the motion to nix the "fest"?
Everyone at the meetings appear to be in agreement that "the show must go on" ... as long as somebody else does all of the work. ( unfortunately "somebody else" no longer attends the meetings)

Clubs do have their small cadre of certain people who ALWAYS step up,but they are burning out or dying off, leaving the number of "core members" dwindling by attrition. 
Personally,I joined AR clubs as a newbie a few years ago to find a collective amateur radio experience with local hams and would like to do more "special events", etc only to be disappointed. I also found that the personal Elmer is just about non-existent, probably due, as you say, to the internet.

The modern AR club going forward  will look more like an impromptu BS session of local hams on a monthly basis that an actual club with activities that require effort on the part of the members.
I found that the free wheeling round table discussion type meetings were always better attended than the ones where activity planning was on the agenda...QED!


Logged

W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2013, 09:29:47 AM »


For a lot of people, the club is a social opportunity, not necessarily a place or venue to get things done.


We refer to those types as "cookie munchers" as all they do (usually) is show up to meetings to get free munchies and then complain about the way the club is run ........

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
K4FMH
Member

Posts: 254




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2013, 12:38:47 PM »

Russ,

The Delta Division held it's first ARRL Leadership Training Workshop at the MS Section Annual Convention last Saturday in Jackson, MS. The Mississippi State University Extension Service sent three staff members to conduct what was a very good session by all accounts. Plus, it was free! And will be an annual ARRL Division program.

David Norris, K5UZ, Division Director and I are beginning to roll it out to the other state conventions in Division states.

73,

Frank
K4FMH

Great comments above. From 55 years experience as a ham and various club affiliations, I'll toss in a few thoughts. Club presidents and other officers must be chosen carefully.  One year without good leadership can set a club back far more than a year.  Officers must gain and have the respect and trust of the general membership. Leaders must be able to think outside of the box. The president in particular must value his or her other officers and the general membership and this value must be expressed. Good educational programs are the draw for attendance so they are a must. Service to others in  the community is a must. The Amateur Creed is a great guide for we individual hams. It can work for a group such as a club. Just a few thoughts with a lot of "musts" because I feel strongly about each point.

Thanks for bringing up this topic. And kudos to the Delta Division for their leadership training initiative.

73 to all,
Russ
Logged
KB1UJS
Member

Posts: 40




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2013, 08:57:52 AM »

I recently become the president of my local club.  The past president had done a nice job keeping the club alive through some pretty dry times, but he was ready to move on and serve the club in other ways.  I try to run club meetings as a facilitator as much as possible.  I put the meeting agendas together, but I let the person responsible for bringing particular issues to the club do the talking at the meetings.  I call for the motions and the votes and abstain from voting as a rule, though our constitution doesn't prevent me from voting.  I try to say as little as possible and keep the meeting moving.  I will occasionally offer a suggestion (from my own thoughts on the subject or from conversations with other executive team members before the meeting) as to how the club could proceed to get the ball rolling, but the club has gone in a different direction several times.  Good or bad, it is the club's decision to make in the end. 

One of the most valuable things we did as a new executive team last year was to establish committees for club functions that should be reported monthly to club members.  We now have a structured way for information about the club station and repeater site to be reported to the club, as well as an RFI committee that can help club members mitigate issues and an ARES committee that keeps the club informed about what the ARES subset of the club is doing without overloading those not interested in emergency communications.  It has worked well, as evidenced by the increased attendance at club meetings.
Logged
K4FMH
Member

Posts: 254




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2013, 12:15:37 PM »

KB1UJS,

Sounds like a very efficient and productive leadership style! I'm sure tht those members who get restless during meetings appreciate it. This is a great contribution!

73,

Frank
K4FMH

I recently become the president of my local club.  The past president had done a nice job keeping the club alive through some pretty dry times, but he was ready to move on and serve the club in other ways.  I try to run club meetings as a facilitator as much as possible.  I put the meeting agendas together, but I let the person responsible for bringing particular issues to the club do the talking at the meetings.  I call for the motions and the votes and abstain from voting as a rule, though our constitution doesn't prevent me from voting.  I try to say as little as possible and keep the meeting moving.  I will occasionally offer a suggestion (from my own thoughts on the subject or from conversations with other executive team members before the meeting) as to how the club could proceed to get the ball rolling, but the club has gone in a different direction several times.  Good or bad, it is the club's decision to make in the end. 

One of the most valuable things we did as a new executive team last year was to establish committees for club functions that should be reported monthly to club members.  We now have a structured way for information about the club station and repeater site to be reported to the club, as well as an RFI committee that can help club members mitigate issues and an ARES committee that keeps the club informed about what the ARES subset of the club is doing without overloading those not interested in emergency communications.  It has worked well, as evidenced by the increased attendance at club meetings.
Logged
KO3D
Member

Posts: 49




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2013, 06:22:43 AM »

Went to a club meeting. It was conducted like a Senate sub-committee hearing. Roberts Rules of Order in full effect. Moving agenda items to third readings. Roll call votes. I never went back.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6007




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2013, 09:06:38 AM »

Went to a club meeting. It was conducted like a Senate sub-committee hearing. Roberts Rules of Order in full effect. Moving agenda items to third readings. Roll call votes. I never went back.

I don't blame you--I would have walked out!

That, however, is why Robert's rules should be used only as a guide and why the club should have set by-laws for the day to day club business and the meetings procedure.
Logged
KA7RRA
Member

Posts: 108




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2013, 12:35:48 AM »

I have asked this before,but who is Robert? and why do we have to use his rules??
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6007




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2013, 03:46:54 AM »

The following was taken in part from several publications and most of it is found in Roberts' Rules of Order itself:

Henry Martyn Robert (1837-1923), author of Robert’s Rules of Order, was a Brigadier General in the Union Army during the Civil War.

In 1863, he was asked to chair a local meeting at a church in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He didn’t know how to preside and assumed the assembly would behave itself. The meeting was a disaster. It lasted some 14 hours and accomplished next to nothing. Very frustrated, General Robert vowed never again to attend another meeting until he knew something of Parliamentary Law, a subject in which he had always been interested.

Later researching a small book on the subject, he found some rules for DELIBERATIVE ASSEMBLIES which had four or five motions according to rank, two or three that could not be debated, and some that could not be amended. As he traveled around the country gathering Parliamentary information along the way, he saw several interpretations of Parliamentary Law in various organizations and “saw the need for a uniform set of rules to enable civic minded people to belong to several organizations or to move to new localities without encountering different parliamentary rules.”

In 1871, he decided he would write sixteen pages of parliamentary rules for lay assemblies and wrote Part 1 based on the Senate/House of Representatives model (mostly patterned after the House). In 1875, his wife urged him to write Part 2 “for the benefit of persons with no experience in meetings.” He finally had these parts published separately in 1876. Both sold extremely well, and he was well on his way to refining the parliamentary rules for DELIBERATIVE ASSEMBLIES that we know today as Robert’s Rules of Order.

Before he died in 1923, he accomplished the major groundwork for establishing the order, rules, and procedures of meetings. He identified the types of motions (main, subsidiary, privileged, incidental) and clarified their order of importance. He wrote Rules of Chairmanship, listed on charts what is debatable and is not, noted which motions require a second and which don't. He determined what sort of majority is needed (simple or 2/3), defined a quorum, and set-up guidelines for proper meeting conduct. His main goal was to ensure that Parliamentary Rules would be standard from group to group, organization to organization, city to city, state to state.

Direct quote from pages XLIV and XLV closing paragraph from RONR 10th ed.: “General Robert was aware of the evolution of parliamentary procedure from consensus in its original sense of “unanimous agreement” toward a decision by a majority as we know it today. He recognized that requiring unanimity or near unanimity can become a form of tyranny itself. Robert saw, on the other hand, that the evolution of majority vote in tandem with lucid and clarifying debate---resulting in a decision representing the view of the deliberate majority---far more clearly ferrets out and demonstrates the will of an assembly. It is through the application of genuine persuasion and parliamentary technique that General Robert was able to achieve decisions in meetings he led which were so free of divisiveness within the group.”

Added:  Robert's rules are guidelines and do not have to be used, but usually are, to keep meetings on track and any business brought up during the meeting able to be acted on in a timely manner.  Usually an organization follows three documents in determining their meeting procedures in the following order:  1. Their constitution, 2. Their bylaws and 3. Robert's rules of order.  Any rule or procedure covered in the first supersedes contrary instruction in the second or third, and likewise anything not covered in the first that is covered in the second supersedes the third.  Also, any procedure in Robert's rules can usually be overridden by a simple voice vote of the membership as long as it doesn't contradict procedure laid down in either the constitution or the bylaws.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 04:40:50 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K4FMH
Member

Posts: 254




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2013, 12:01:37 PM »

Great (and civil!) comments, all around!

One thing mentioned that is subtle but very important, it seems to me. The underlying theme of a club to be a social gathering rather than one focused on actions...be it a hamfest, set of repeaters, EmComm, DX, Field Day, and so forth...is certainly legitimate. A small number of members of a club with this ethos will find themselves frustrated if they want to "do" things.

Good discussion...let's keep it up.

73,

Frank
K4FMH
Logged
KO3D
Member

Posts: 49




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2013, 06:34:52 PM »

Great (and civil!) comments, all around!

One thing mentioned that is subtle but very important, it seems to me. The underlying theme of a club to be a social gathering rather than one focused on actions...be it a hamfest, set of repeaters, EmComm, DX, Field Day, and so forth...is certainly legitimate. A small number of members of a club with this ethos will find themselves frustrated if they want to "do" things.

I realize that this is most of my frustration with local clubs. It's really hard to break into a group that's been meeting for breakfast every Sunday since 1975. They really aren't about Ham radio so much as a social club.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!