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Author Topic: 48 VDC Power Supply Nortel N0061124  (Read 1837 times)
WA4MDP
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Posts: 3




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« on: December 06, 2012, 12:30:32 PM »

I am trying to adapt this surplus phone company equipment to power a solid state HF amplifier.
It was made by Artesyn Technologies. 7000894-J1400 is their model #. Any ideas where I may find a schematic or pin out data for this item? Im sure someone has successfully adapted this unit and I would welcome any input.
'73
WA4MDP
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20547




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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2012, 01:28:27 PM »

Sounds like an OEM model not sold to the general public, and for the telecom industry.

Artesyn and Astec were both acquired by Emerson and are now "Emerson Network Power," based near San Diego.

Have you tried contacting them?
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WA4MDP
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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2012, 06:05:13 PM »

I have emailed them but have not had a reply.
Thanks'
Garry
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2012, 10:29:32 AM »

I have emailed them but have not had a reply.
Thanks'
Garry

I've found that rarely works. Tongue

I'd call them on the telephone and ask for Tech Support.

With many of these "OEM" models, everything about them is a big secret and they may not tell you anything, but it's worth a try.
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2012, 01:39:39 PM »

you need to know what it came out of, and then you might find some data online that identifies the pinout.  Nortel is, of course, gone and of no help, but if somehow a manual made it online, that's kewl.

the other thing to do is lift the cover and play detective.  there will be lower voltages plus and minus, possibly an AC interlock, and if you have a big ol' heat sink with one or more devices leading to a pin, that's probably golden.

a note again... when you're talking Telco, that is a positive-ground kind of place.  their red wires in the CO are actually negative voltage.  you need to put a reasonable load on any "rectifier" and use your Fluke to be sure you know where positive and negative are.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2012, 03:19:15 PM »

Even when a commercial supply like the one in question is still being manufactured, don't expect the manufacturing company to stop whatever their doing to help an Amateur use such a product, much less one that is out of production and the brand is under a new roof.  They simply are not set up for such, don't make any money from such and employees are not likely to gain much in the way of anything but trouble from their supervisors if they do indeed take whatever the sup deems to be too much time dealing with you. 

Sometimes the gift of gab to the right person at the right time can yield results, though. 

One of my old dear profs, who had oodles of experience as a technician before earning his degrees used to tell us, "You don't need a schematic to troubleshoot a power supply." 

In many ways, what he said was as true then as it is today.  But such takes quite a bit of learned knowledge coupled with maybe even more in the way of hands on experience before the person who tackles the project can provide good results with any statistical amount of successes expected. 

Sometimes studying the schematics of similar supplies that you can indeed get your hands on can answer questions about the supply you have in hand, or at least put you on the right track to being able to figure some things out. 

Labeling of any kind at connection points may be rather standardized, don't overlook that, for it may be used to reveal connections by studying other supply data, even from other manufacturers. 

Removing an old supply from surplus equipments, always a good idea to snip connecting wires, leaving a bit of the original color coded wires left on connector or screws such that later on that may provide clues to connection points if such are standardized.  Like the common convention of Red for Pos and Black for Neg, bearing in mind that the voltmeter is always the definitive for such and that you should see for real if the polarity is the way you think it should be before attempting to operate any equipments. 

Also be aware that many Industrial/Commercial supplies often come with Sensing terminals + and - that are used to connect two smaller wires at the other end of the big wires that carry the main current.  These are often used so that the supply circuitry can measure the voltage right at the load and govern regulation accordingly.  When those Sensing terminals are used in applications where the voltage right a load is not all that critical, they are typically just jumped over to the Pos and Neg outputs right there at the supply with very short jumpers. 

Finally, for this purpose, locating and befriending a retired old Telco tech may just prove to be all the resource you will ever need. 

73
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N4KD
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Posts: 132




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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2012, 03:23:28 AM »

Gary,
You need to take that PS to a North Fulton ARC meeting. There are a number of retired Bell/ATT employees that regularly attend. Look at www.nfarl.org for details.
Dave N4KD
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