Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cleaning Vibroplex of Coal/Fire soot?  (Read 7461 times)
K3STX
Member

Posts: 1050




Ignore
« on: December 26, 2012, 05:24:42 AM »

NOTE: This is a re-post from the CW Forum, but this one might be more appropriate.

I just got a 1963 Vibroplex Champion but and it looks like it has been through a fire! SEEMS LIKE soot, but it does not wipe off at all and even with gentle soap/water/toothbrush still looks like black goo.Any ideas on what to do? What would be BAD to do, what would be OK? I can try to post pix later.

Another thought is it might be soot if it were used in a coal railyard/train depot. There is an extra hole drilled in the base, obviously to attach to a desk. The top of the (chrome-plated?) cable lugnuts came shiny with my fingernail "chipping off" the crud, as did the dit contact. But the rest of the dit contact assembly is REALLY hard to get the stuff off, oxidation eating away nickel plating? If it were a FIRE the finger pieces would be toast; they are OK.

NOTE: After an overnight soak in soapy water I can chip off a bit of the black crud with my fingernail, but obviously not water soluble. I am thinking of an overnight soak in automobile carb cleaner.

This was my (cheap) Christmas present to myself, made in my birth year 1963. I gotta fix this Champion.

Paul
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4816




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2012, 05:31:32 AM »

Krud Kutter from Lowes or Home Depot.

Spray on and let soak for 2-3 min. Then rinse with water. Repeat is necessary. This stuff is amazing, safe, non-toxic, etc.
Logged
W9GB
Member

Posts: 2654




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 05:58:01 AM »

For the metal parts, chrome cleaners at your local automotive store.
A good buffing wheel and proper low grit polish (jeweler's rouge) can perform great restoration of metal finishes.
  Your quality motorcycle or car detailers know these methods.
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 1050




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 06:13:07 AM »

I will try some Krud Kutter.
I tried Goof-Off, it did nothing.
I tried De-Solv-it, it did nothing.

And we are FAR from chrome!! Not even close to the Maas point yet.

paul

ps I am not too interested in "environmentally friendly". I am into harsh chemicals if they will do the job.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2012, 06:26:10 AM by K3STX » Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2012, 06:37:21 AM »

If the black crud is oil or tar based the short path to dissolving it would be with a petroleum or mineral based solvent... Mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, or even a squirt of WD-40 will tell you if that's the ticket. Regardless of what you try, be patient and give it time to work. With any polished finish it's usually better to go slow than to risk permanently damaging the surface.

BTW:  Brasso works exceptionally well on nickel and other metals and is gentle enough to polish Plexiglas. Once you get it clean, get it shiny.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2012, 06:43:30 AM by AC5UP » Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4816




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 06:37:29 AM »

I have used Krud Kutter on chrome, painted surfaces, and all other surfaces.
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2445




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2012, 09:43:22 AM »

I would suggest Flitz or Simi-Chrome

I haven't used Brasso since it was reformulated.  I understand they removed the ammonia and petroleum and substituted alcohol in the US version.  I've seen complaints that it doesn't work nearly as well now.
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2012, 10:45:08 AM »

If the good KrudKutter brand doesn't melt it, I've had success resorting to "Formula 409" along with time and a toothbrush, resurrecting some audiophile gear from smoke damage. 


73
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4834




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2012, 02:24:01 PM »

Is it a 'de Lux' all chrome model, or a 'normal' with a crinkle painted base? If the latter, repainting may be a better answer.
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2012, 02:48:46 PM »

...so for the hell of it I do a web search on metal polishes. Haven't shopped them for a while and maybe I need to catch up.

Observations:

1)  Flits had better be good... Found a two pound can of the paste version on Amazon for $37.55. Call me cheap, but to me the price seems steep...

2)  Maas is apparently well regarded in the aircraft industry as this web site claims. I also see that Maas for guns can restore the accuracy in old firearms. Who Knew that a shiny gun shoots straighter? Will wonders never cease............  Roll Eyes

3)  Mothers waxes and polishes. What more do you need to know?
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2012, 03:58:51 PM »

Yo, AC5UP --  Using it on the BORE of a very dirty or even mildly corroded rifle or rifled barrel handgun, may indeed improve accuracy. 


73
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 1050




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2012, 05:08:06 PM »

I don't honk you guys understand. Metal POLISH will not do anything yet. I am not down to the metal. This thing looks like the inside of a dirty over. I am even considering (A little) using EZRA-Off oven cleaner on it. This "layer" of "cake" can be chiped off with my (now filthy) fingernail.

Paul
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2012, 05:18:28 PM »

...if you end up chipping or scraping it off, you will need to polish out the scratches.

BTW:  Maybe that's why you have eight fingernails and two thumbnails. I wonder if an old credit card would help chip the gunk.

Note to KE3WD:  Since 1903!
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2012, 06:37:53 PM »

Hoppes is the old favorite, but it is better at maintenance rather than taking care of the inside of a barrel that has not been maintained.  Sometimes the old family rifle just sat in a closet in humid weather, etc.  Then there's all the old, old rifles that were shot with fouling powders and primers and put away wet.  Takes a bit more than the Hoppes to get that crap outta there. 

The old gunsmiths used to boil out barrels.  I think its still done, but some of today's chemistry offerings seem to work as well, depending on a few factors. 


73
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 1050




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2012, 07:47:03 PM »

I don't honk you guys understand. Metal POLISH will not do anything yet. I am not down to the metal. This thing looks like the inside of a dirty over. I am even considering (A little) using EZRA-Off oven cleaner on it. This "layer" of "cake" can be chiped off with my (now filthy) fingernail.

Paul

Wow, talk about typos!

"I don't THINK you guys understand."
"Inside of a dirty OVEN."

And a toothpick is easier than my fingernails, I gotta figure out how to soften this stuff up.

Krud Kutter did nothing (the "regular" concentrated stuff, not the stuff sold "to remove rust"). I only soaked it in the Krud Kutter for 5 minutes, can I soak the parts in this overnight (or will it eat away the nickel?).

Paul
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!