Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: High end paddles  (Read 805 times)
CWBILL
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« on: March 06, 2009, 06:19:46 PM »

Is their a noticable difference when using such a paddle compared to a lower priced one?
Logged
W8ZNX
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2009, 11:16:41 AM »

yes and no
it can be quite subjective

look at it this way
a telegraph key is simply a tool
for sending morse code

building wood boats or sending morse code
it usualy is easier / less work to use
high end tools

a realy great telegrapher can use
any sort of junk key and send great morse code

i find it much easier to use a expensive
well made key

an expensive well made key
will last you a lifetime

what do i use
Vibroplex Champ
Vibroplex Lightning bug
Junker
Schurr Profi II
GHD opto electric bug

your results may vary

yours truly
mac dit dit










Logged
KC2MJT
Member

Posts: 59




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2009, 03:20:54 PM »

Mac is spot on. Each key has it's own character e.g. feel. High end keys are usually easier to adjust, hold their adjustment a longer time (unless the temp in your shack varies considerably) and do not require mechanical clamping to a surface to hold them steady while in use.

Be that as it may, I use my HIGH END paddles daily, but prefer some cheap paddles when backpacking or on road trips. Portability and weight become more important than feel. On a sailboat in a heavy seaway you don't want paddles that are so sensitive that if you breathe they make a dit. You'd prefer a clunky set of paddles with a large throw and perhaps a bit of pressure required to make them sound off.

High end paddles can be adjusted down to a hair width of a gap and require very little more force than a blink of your eye to make them sound off. Many inexpensive paddles are like whacking two hockey sticks together. If you have a heavy fist or prefer a mechanical snap to your keying, you may prefer less expensive paddles. I use a Begali paddle at home, and either a Bulldog key made from a paper clip or a set of Palm Paddles while backpacking. I own others, but stick with the three mentioned. All a matter of personal taste.

To be honest, I've found that after 20 minutes you get used to anything on your desk. Some paddles just allow you to operate longer than others before fatique sets in.

p.s. I hope Mac doesn't mind if I mention, he often frequents 3.875 Mhz in the wee hours and probably can give you some good pointers based on his long experience.
73
Logged
LB3KB
Member

Posts: 221


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2009, 05:28:22 PM »

What is "high end" to you ?

I prefer Bencher Hex over Bencher BY, because it takes the abuse better when I get eager.  For me it's actually cheaper as well, as I use up the BYs in no time at all...

I wouldn't call either of them "high end" though - they are both reasonably priced for the quality you get.

73
LB3KB Sigurd
http://justlearnmorsecode.com
Logged
CWBILL
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2009, 09:01:05 PM »

I am currently using a Palm radio mini paddle as my everyday paddle, Its a wonderful little paddle, but I am regulary re-adjusting it and cannot adjust it as closely as I would prefer. I have also used a Vibroplex deluxe for a number of years, but again I was regulary having to adjust the contacts and could not get as close of adjustments as I wanted. So now I have been considering something in the Begali line with magnetic resistance and tighter adjustments.
Logged
W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2009, 07:25:50 AM »

I've been using basic, no-frills Bencher BY-1
paddles that I bought new in about 1980.

How happy you would be with them probably depends
on whether you key with a light or heavy touch.
I key with a light touch, and they have held their
adjustments with no issues.

So they do what I need them to, and the only
other paddles I've acquired since then have been
small ones to use when backpacking.

73
Scott
W5ESE
Logged
K1HS
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2009, 08:07:56 AM »

http://www.k8ra.com/

Check these out. They're a whole lot of paddle for the money!
Logged
VE3GNU
Member

Posts: 83




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2009, 12:28:45 PM »

Has anyone any experience with the Vibroplex Square Racer magnetic paddle?  It is one of the recommended paddles by DJ8GO who, on Dec. 10/05, posted an article under the title: The Foothills of Paddle Mountain.
The Bencher BY-1 is the only paddle I've ever owned, and I wonder what it would be like to operate with magnets rather than springs.
Thanks in advance.
Ernie
VE3GNU
Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 328




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2009, 10:28:26 PM »

I use the Vibroplex Brass Racer although it is actually an older Hamco Scotia that I swapped the wood base from a Vibroplex because the Hamco had the keyer built in originally. Other than the shape it is about the same as the Square Brass Racer although mine has set screws that drop down from the top to hold the magnets in place. I added weight to the inside perimeter of the wood base so it travels a lot less when using it. The square one probably is heavier just because it is square. I have had it since the early seventies and I still like it better than most. I have a Vibroplex Iambic Deluxe that I hardly ever use. Looks nice though! About all I would really like better is a Begali Magnetic Classic but it is too many bongo bucks for me! I like a small footprint, low profile, shiny brass or gold color finish and magnetic action.  
Logged
KE7FQR
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2009, 08:39:29 AM »

I have a Vibroplex Square Racer that I use. They are a little tricky to adjust and the two plastic 8-32 rear set screws are notorious for working loose. I replaced them with two metal ones and put a little Loctite BLUE on them to keep them from moving. After doing that there's been no problems with it going out of adjustment. Also, this paddle is intended more for a light touch than a heavy hand. I hope this helps.

Regards,
Rick Salmon
Logged
VE3GNU
Member

Posts: 83




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2009, 10:52:50 AM »

In view of only 9 Eham 'keys and paddles' reviews on this particular paddle---I thought that placing the question here would engender some additional responses---and it has, thank you.
It appears that the issue of 'loose screws' has been a concern to a number of operators---leading me to wonder whether it's a design or operator flaw!!
Blue and Red Loctite seem to figure prominently in some of the postings.
Operator N9SKN appears to have a unique perspective on the 'looseness' of the essential screws---which merits consideration---in my view.  Interesting!
73---Ernie
Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 328




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2009, 10:14:44 PM »

The plastic screws must be a Vibroplex thing. The screws in that position on my "Scotia-plex" are not plastic and they are pretty tight to turn so do not go out of adjustment. How are the magnets held in place on the Vibroplex Square Racer??
Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 328




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2009, 10:15:38 PM »

The plastic screws must be a Vibroplex thing. The screws in that position on my "Scotia-plex" are not plastic and they are pretty tight to turn so do not go out of adjustment. How are the magnets held in place on the Vibroplex Square Racer??
Logged
W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2009, 06:47:37 AM »

> It appears that the issue of 'loose screws' has been
> a concern to a number of operators---leading me to
> wonder whether it's a design or operator flaw!!

I don't think it's a flaw, but may be old habits
that are hard to break!

Before electronic keyers became less expensive,
"bugs" (semi-automatic) keys were used. Bugs
require a more muscular action (from the arm),
to launch the pendulum to vibrating for
generating the "dits".

Operators accustomed to sending with a "bug", that
switch to paddles, may continue with that more
forceful touch, although it's not required for
paddles, and may whack it out of adjustment.

73
Scott
W5ESE
Logged
N7DM
Member

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2009, 08:23:36 AM »

Amen, Brother!  Try as I may, I *cannot* gently run those Iambic paddles... it has been YEARS, now. But the Benchers don't get out of adjustment.....
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!