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Author Topic: Two dits?  (Read 1588 times)
WU1E
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2009, 09:31:45 AM »

Ok, so the whole shave and a haircut two bits thing seems to be in the past.
Now when I recieve a dit dit and send back a dit dit, thats pretty standard procedure and not necessarily liddish ?
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N2EY
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Posts: 3894




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« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2009, 11:44:13 AM »

It's the standard final goodbye in a QSO. Kinda like the way folks will thump the side of a vehicle twice to mean "ready to go".

In transit operations such as subways, two buzzes on the annunciator tells the motorman it's OK to go.

---

Now, for a more obscure one:

Where does the saying "take 5" come from?

73 de Jim, N2EY  
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WU1E
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2009, 02:57:22 PM »

Near as I can tell it started as something to do with timing of music, but I suspect you might have something really interesting to add ?
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N2EY
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Posts: 3894




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« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2009, 06:35:17 AM »

The phrase "take 5" is mostly used by performing arts folks to mean "take a break" during rehearsals and such.

But it actually derives from the landline telegraph.

In the days when the telegraph wire was the "Victorian internet" (great book, btw), speed and brevity on the wire were essential. There were all sorts of abbreviations and systems developed to save time on the wire. Our abbreviations like "73" and "88" are remnants of this sort of thing. (They come from the numerical Phillips abbreviations.)

It was also a time when people used euphemisms a lot, such as calling the privy "the necessity" and such.

The unofficial abbreviation on the wire for a bathroom break was the letter P, for obvious reasons. In the landline version of Morse Code, the letter P is five dits.

So the spoken version became "take 5", referring to the five dits in the letter P. The phrase was copied
by non-telegraphers and entered the language without many knowing its origin.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K9MRD
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Posts: 331




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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2009, 10:36:36 AM »

<<Where does the saying "take 5" come from?>>

Dave Brubeck
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2009, 09:18:49 PM »

Dave Clark 5
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WU1E
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2009, 07:29:21 PM »

Great information Jim. That is good stuff. When I talk to non ham friends about my hobby it's stories like that, that they really seem to get kick out of.

Thanks !!
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N8CPA
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2009, 11:33:23 PM »

>>I use the "dit dit" most of the time but what does "shave and a hair cut" refer to? I've only been doing CW since Jan 2007 so I'm still learning the lingo.

Mike<<

"Shave and a hair cut" refers to the pattern generated by the letters ESE. Tap that out. You'll recognize it. It's not just a ham thing. It was even a gag in the movie "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?"

The words are "Shave and a hair cut, two bits." When used in Morse it's sent as ESE. And the answer is two dits.

It has been a long time since anyone actually sent me ESE.  But I do frequently exchange the two dit salute.  
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W5ESE
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Posts: 550


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« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2009, 07:25:22 AM »

N8CPA spelled it out right.

The "shave and a haircut" (-ESE) sequence was popular
especially with Novices, the licensees who had only
recently learned the morse code.

It's difficult to convey today the enthusiasm that
new amateurs felt during the 'Novice era'
(1950's-1980's), at the pride in learning the code
and becoming newly licensed hams. New hams would
toot out greetings to each other in morse on their
car horns, and so on.

The hobby has become somewhat more staid as it's
become easier to earn a ticket.

I liked the "shave and a haircut" tradition so much,
I changed my callsign to 'W5ESE'. You'll hear
several of us on the CW bands, with the 'dit dididit dit' callsigns.

The '-ESE' calls were particularly popular among
QRP operators, and we even had a quarterly contest
going for a while:

http://www.io.com/~n5fc/barbershop_contest.htm

73
Scott
W5ESE
dit dit

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K0BT
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Posts: 189




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« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2009, 02:40:39 PM »

W5ESE said:  "New hams would
toot out greetings to each other in morse on their
car horns, and so on."

I used to do that, too.  A couple of months back, I passed a car with a callsign tag and antennas on the way to a local hamfest.  I tooted "HI" on the car horn and he flipped me off!  I laughed about it for the rest of the day...
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LB3KB
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Posts: 227


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« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2009, 01:31:10 PM »

HI is not a greeting...


73
LB3KB Sigurd
http://justlearnmorsecode.com
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KB2FCV
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Posts: 1220


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« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2009, 11:43:38 AM »

It's the shortened version of the 'Shave and a Haircut two bits' that hams do on the air after a qso.

I still prefer the full version myself! Smiley
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VE3XDB
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Posts: 139




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« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2009, 02:19:14 PM »

I was thinking Brubeck as well...great sound!

http://odeo.com/episodes/1117190

CUL es tnx fb qso 73 de ve3xdb
dit dit

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AD7WN
Member

Posts: 113




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« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2009, 07:54:10 PM »

Prior post regarding ham use and military and marine CW use are undoubtedly correct.  There was also another application of the use of sending EE which, to me, was interesting.

Military operators of several countries contrived a plan to pass traffic in a manner that would probably not be intercepted.  Two ops of a military net would agree in advance to meet at a given time on a given frequency.  They would not exchange callsigns, at least not initially.

At the appointed time on the appointed frequency, one op would send EE.  The other would reply EE.  The station with traffic to send would proceed with sending the coded text, not the preamble.  After the text was received and QSLd, he would then send the message preamble.  Only after that was received and QSLd would the two stations exchange callsigns, and then authentication codes.  At that point they would suddenly go silent.

The chance of that traffic being successfully intercepted would be slim to none.  That technique was used by the military of several countries from the 1940s through the 1960s and possibly even later.

73 de John/AD7WN
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