Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Zero-Five vs. DX-Engineering 43 ft - Build Quality  (Read 6892 times)
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1482




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2013, 09:35:45 AM »

From an engineering perspective the bolt threads riding in the channel of the plate will have a tendency to chew things up a bit. If the slots were a slight bit bigger they could go with stainless steel bushings over the bolts so that during the raising/lowering operation the bushing is rolling along in the slot. This would reduce any chance of binding or galling of the bolts or plate.

Then again, how often are you raising or lowering the antenna?
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K0BT
Member

Posts: 189




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2013, 11:46:28 AM »

Quote
"What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?"

Happened to me quite a few times with my DXE plate in the 3+ years I've had the antenna.  Replaced the bolts several times. Much easier to happen with their 43' verticals than with small verticals, like a Hustler. You do get better with practice. Best to use two people and wait for a calm day.

I use the DX Engineering tilt base with a 6BTV and replace the bolts about once a year. It's usually because I get careless or am in a hurry. If you don't lift the antenna and seat the bolts into the offset slot, and if you don't maintain upward force on the antenna while tilting it, it is very easy to bind things up and bend the bolts.  

I like having the tilt base, even if I sometimes mess up. It works pretty well when I'm careful to use the right technique. I raise and lower the antenna several times a week during monsoon season because those big desert thunderstorms can be pretty exciting.

« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 11:51:51 AM by K0BT » Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!