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Author Topic: Should I join?  (Read 68599 times)
N4ZAW
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Posts: 84


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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2013, 08:49:44 PM »

OK I understand some of this but if we have a solar storm or an EMP happen, the military is a step ahead of any of us unless we have hardened equipment, right?


I would think (without knowing for sure) that ALL of it is fair game, given a high enough direct-whack from a huge flare, even some of the old hybrid classics like the Kenwood 520 and the Yaesu 101 would be rendered scrap metal. I'm sure the gubment has a pallet or two of mil spec, late model communications gear under under Cheyanne Mountian or somewhere. Certainly, one or two of my FT-840's would likely be casualties if the whack is big enough, even tho my shop and my radio room both have the makeshift electrical equivalent to faraday cages around them and my diagnostic gear. And still, this whole scenario may be incomplete.
"Prepare for the worse, and pray for the best". I also stored static-sensitive repair components like schottkey diodes, FET's mosfets and CPU's inside ammo boxes in my grounded metal shed, and THEY may not even totally survive.. But talk about post-apocalyptic "currency", those that do are would be worth more than gold in the right hands --- say, that of AF MARS, or the surviving remnant of "The Resistance". Or In such a scenario, would I no longer be a utility inspector, but a bench tech and radio operator for the resistance? Would I be trading my skills and components for bread? And a massive EMP is but one of many possibilities that have the potential to plunge civilization into dark ages or anarchy.
 Rouge nations, our own rouge regimes, meteors, super volcanoes -- zombies?  Tongue
My point is that we cannot ever prepare for everything, but we can do what we have time and money to, and meet grubby times head-on. I will always do what I can do, and question myself if what I actually accomplished with my prep is adequate, or not... Right now, you're kicking that same question around in your head, i'll wager.

IMHO, in addition to MARS service and traffic handling, every ham should learn CW, packet, and as many other modes as possible, because they are all forms of encryption against untrained reception,while insuring some level of error-correction. The "Codetalkers" of WWII are a prime example. and you know we are not to use "encryption" according the fcc, right?
WHY? Because they need to be able to intercept communications and comprehend them. After all, "We the people" are all potential "terrorists" in their eyes. Given the right doomsday scenario, our own gubment might actually be our nemesis! Are preparation efforts a matter of life-n-death?
Well -- not at the moment.






 
« Last Edit: August 14, 2013, 09:36:02 PM by N4ZAW » Logged
KC8YHN
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2013, 05:59:23 PM »

...

My point is that we cannot ever prepare for everything, but we can do what we have time and money to, and meet grubby times head-on. I will always do what I can do, and question myself if what I actually accomplished with my prep is adequate, or not... Right now, you're kicking that same question around in your head, i'll wager.

IMHO, in addition to MARS service and traffic handling, every ham should learn CW, packet, and as many other modes as possible, because they are all forms of encryption against untrained reception,while insuring some level of error-correction. The "Codetalkers" of WWII are a prime example. and you know we are not to use "encryption" according the fcc, right?
WHY? Because they need to be able to intercept communications and comprehend them. After all, "We the people" are all potential "terrorists" in their eyes. Given the right doomsday scenario, our own gubment might actually be our nemesis! Are preparation efforts a matter of life-n-death?
Well -- not at the moment.

OK I got that much, and more Smiley but see here is what I'm sitting here wondering about the time getting involved with MARS is worth the effort to learn message handling or would this lead up to something a bit more say if I would be activated to do more under stressful conditions like a disaster. Don't get me wrong, I am one a few who want to better our skills but wonder if those skills would be limited for use beyond MARS.

I mean that it looks as if there is a diminishing value to the Armed forces, some confusion involved with a stated clear mission or the use of it for what is considered normal communications which didn't exist when it was established.

Maybe I'm reading too much negative information from those who seem to find fault with the program and/or some people within it, or maybe I don't hear what is actually done but I question the use of it at times of disaster like an EMP or solar flare where the military would not even consider the use of a civilian communications strategy unless there is an absolute need for it but more importantly if the capability of the civilian group being able to communicate at all would be a consideration. 
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KF7VXA
Member

Posts: 458




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« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2013, 07:11:36 PM »

Another thing Mars offers is a great deal of bandwidth should it be needed, much more than the amateur bands.
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NX5MK
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2013, 02:51:03 PM »

KC8YHN,

Please look here for example:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_Auxiliary_Radio_System#Missions
for what the MARS mission is. Take your favorite search engine and look for other websites on the topic, they will all give you the same info. Don't see why there can be any confusion about the current mission of the service.

Same goes for the misconception that the MARS service would not be used during civil emergencies. See this text excerpt for example:
http://marsradiowatch.com/army.php
"During Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the Fort Huachuca MARS Station relayed messages that could not be passed in the affected area because the communications infrastructure was destroyed."

There are so many ways in which you can build a stronger community, be it through MARS, CERT, ARES, Red Cross, Salvation Army, you name it. Search them out, get to know them and join them if they seem receptive to what you have to offer. Yes, I've seen my fair share of those in "leadership" positions in a service who are guided more by their ego than by their will to follow The Amateur Code. I am sure your efforts will support your family, friends and community in general. Don't be put off by naysayers or those who want to stop you doing the right thing, that's just QRM. Illegitimi non carborundum.

Wish you fun in whatever you will choose. I am sure you will find it rewarding.

73 de Marcus
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AB4O
Member

Posts: 34




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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2013, 04:00:21 PM »

Greg,
I guess the easiest thing for you to do really see how you feel about would be to join. There is a 90 day trial period (at least in Navy Mars) where you can see if it is something you want to do. There are ample training opportunities available to improve your operating skill. If you decide it's not what you want or they decide they do not want your services no harm no foul. At least you gave it a try. Just my two cents.
John
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N9AOP
Member

Posts: 144




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« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2013, 07:55:41 PM »

The easiest way I can 'splain it to you is that MARS members train and exercise on a regular basis for an event that we hope will never happen.  You are more than welcome to join and see how you like it. 
Art--army MARS
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WA1OEZ
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2013, 09:41:05 AM »

If you want an idea of how MARS currently relates to the military, this is from
the army.mil website.

http://www.army.mil/article/117034/Army_s_Military_Auxiliary_Radio_System_still_relevant_in_Internet_age/

Bob
Army MARS
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