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Author Topic: Yea. Learning CW was frustrating. but....  (Read 510 times)
W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« on: July 02, 2009, 03:56:44 AM »

I was watching Enemy of the State again.  During the movie, they show a shot of a satellite refocusing on Earth and I suddenly hear CQ.  Every time they show the satellite they dub in CQ CQ.

For some reason, I can copy CQ sent at a higher rate of speed than either C or Q; seems as if its always been that way.

Then it hits me-its still exciting to hear a CQ, even if its just in a movie.  Pulling CQ out of a noisy band, like 40 meters has always been a challenge and at the same time exciting FUN.

At the end of the movie, there it is again, CQ CQ.

So, I plug my new UHF stacked bow tie roof antenna into my R4C, using an an adapter from F to PL259, turn my rig on, scan around, and there's w5 working a VE1.

I'm so glad my first ticket was a CW only ticket.

The W5 has signed, and now the VE1 is calling CQ.

Best from HOT Tucson
Bob
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K8MMG
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2009, 05:14:01 AM »

Agreed. There is little that is sweeter-sounding on the air than a CW CQ. Very distinctive. Hope to work you on the air some day OM.

73,

Brandon
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WB5JEO
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Posts: 805




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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2009, 06:21:23 AM »

More than that. It's a word. Humans hear language as words. "C" and "Q" have no meaning. "CQ" does. The spoken "seek-you" is a word/phrase on phone. _._. _ _._ is a word in CW with exactly the same meaning.

It's a simple example of what the fastest and most adept operators do. If you hear words, rather than letters, you can just let the meaning flow into your head. I could speak to you "N O W  I S  T H E," speaking each letter. If I went on any longer, you'd quickly lose the meaning (which is why we spell to hide meaning from children), unless you wrote it down as I went and went back and read it again. If I say, "now is the," you take it in effortlessly and can go on listening indefinitely, just as you do in conversation, and will retain the meaning without writing anything.

I suppose we could put together a list of the most commonly used words and phrases in routine QSO's, to the end of learning to hear those as words. Sort of like what appears at the end of this article:

http://w6rec.com/duane/amateur/cw.htm

As the author says, if you tell me you can copy "CQ" at 35 WPM, you're telling me you can copy Morse at 35 WPM, but you just need a larger vocabulary.
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WW5AA
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Posts: 2086




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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2009, 06:33:21 AM »

"As the author says, if you tell me you can copy "CQ" at 35 WPM, you're telling me you can copy Morse at 35 WPM, but you just need a larger vocabulary."

....and if you add DX. CQ DX is a wonderful little tune!

73 de Lindy
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2009, 06:58:28 PM »

Indeed...that's exactly what happens in CW.  As you have more Qs you will enlarge your CW vocabulary.  Time is the key.  That's one reason ragchewing is so important.  Once you can relax and get better at conversational CW, you can go a long way fast.  Don't get uptight or you will totally lose the thread of the QSO. It's also a reason why you shouldn't send faster than you can copy.  Patience my friend, patience.  

Rick, n5xm
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