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Author Topic: eave mounting a GP-3  (Read 1202 times)
PATRICKKOMAR
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Posts: 20




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« on: February 01, 2013, 08:40:42 PM »

So it's time to get my comet gp-3 in the air, I'm wanting to use an eave mount( http://dennysantennaservice.com/1079223.html ) using schedule 80 rigid conduit as my mast. ( http://www.lowes.com/pd_73207-1792-101093_4294722503__?productId=3129615&Ns=p_product_avg_rating|1 ) I have a swap cooler dead center of my roof line ( can't wait to see what kind of RF noise that thing puts out  Huh), But my plan is to have the base of the antenna above the top of the cooler buy about a foot witch will have roughly about 6' of mast above the roof line. Is 4' in the eave mount enough? Is there a rule of thumb on how much mast you should run under the roof line VS above? Do i or should I guy the mast some were above the roof line?
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N7SMI
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Posts: 315




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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2013, 09:07:39 PM »

In looking at the eave mount, I don't think the top and bottom brackets could possibly be installed 4 vertical feet apart, unless you have a VERY steep pitched roof. The closer together they are, the more torque will be applied to them by the mast and antenna above.

Fortunately, the GP-3 weighs less than 3 pounds and has very little wind load. You might even consider a lighter weight mast (the schedule 80 is overkill, I think) such as a chain-link fence top post. Assuming you don't go to crazy on mast height, and if the eave mount is anchored into something relatively strong, your house will blow over before the antenna will come down. You'll lose little having it a couple feet lower - and the swamp cooler should have little affect on transmit/receive (RF noise may be a different story).

BTW, I have a GP-6 on a similar set up. Mine's on a 6 foot mast. I think you'll be very happy with your GP-3.
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KF5RGB
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Posts: 16




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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2013, 09:36:41 AM »

With my GP-6 I just mounted two conduit clamps, like these........

http://cloudfront.zorotools.com/product/full/4RHZ4_AS01.JPG

...to the eave of the house with lag bolts & used the clamps to support my GP-6. I had a ridgid conduit from the ground all the way up the side of the eave supporting the antenna originally but it seemed like overkill.
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PATRICKKOMAR
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2013, 10:41:45 AM »

I do have a very step pitched roof on the front side of the house, and it's normal pitch on the back side, but luckily for me the steep eave line carries over into the back side of the house, Its a strange design I don't under stand but It's going to work out great for eave mounting my GP3 I believe. That mount will adjust out to a 46" width, so I will just play it buy ear and see how much mast I can get stuck under the roof line. I take it that guy lines shouldn't be necessary on this application?
As far as the schedule 80 rigid conduit  mast go's I'm of the cult that believes that there is no kill like an over kill!   
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KF5RGB
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Posts: 16




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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 11:17:01 AM »

No guys lines are necessary, its basically just a 5 ft stick of PVC conduit with a little wire inside, it aint gonna go anywhere!
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