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Author Topic: How did you old heads learn morse?  (Read 2710 times)
W7ETA
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2009, 01:41:20 AM »

:-)

I check out people's age by asking them if they know who Timothy Leary was; what Bezerkeley was?

Best from warm Tucson
Bob
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N2UGB
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2009, 02:41:30 PM »

USAF AACS radio operator school, Keesler AFB. I wanted and requested that career field! 16 WPM required or KP for the rest of my hitch. No problem with that motivation. Most interesting job I ever had.

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N2EY
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Posts: 3880




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« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2009, 04:01:15 PM »

"I check out people's age by asking them if they know who Timothy Leary was; what Bezerkeley was?"

Timothy Leary's dead.

If you remember the 1960s, you really weren't there. The Summer of Love was 40 years ago!

You bet your bippy!


73 de Jim, N2EY
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2009, 09:02:05 AM »

My 8th grade science teacher had a ham radio class. After school he sent us code practice using an old Heathkit HD-1410 keyer. He also used tapes as well for the days he was correcting papers or doing other things. I got on the air alot afterwards. I went and took my 20 wpm test on a whim the weekend after field day at a hamfest.. past 20wpm 6 months after I passed my 5wpm! I was an extra a year later (wanted to get it before the 1 year expiration on the csce)
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W3JJH
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« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2009, 09:26:47 AM »

I learned American Morse from my grandfather who was a railroad telegrapher (straight key and sounder).  I learned International Morse to complete the requirements for First Class Scout (via flashlight) back in 1959.
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KU2US
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Posts: 74




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« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2009, 05:57:22 AM »

I am 60 years old, and I also used the Ameco code records-the 33 1/3 vinyls. I bought an older SW reciever, and LISTENED on the cw portion of the 40 meter band. Also in my spare time, I walked around the house and outside, and whatever I saw, I transmitted CW in my head (like car-dah di dah di/di dah/di dah di. It works..with time..
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KQ9J
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« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2009, 09:11:58 AM »

Old head and proud of it  Smiley

Used Ameco code practice records on 33 1/3 rpm vinyl LPs and a heathkit code practice oscillator.

Later, used W1AW practice sessions to build up to 20 WPM.

I don't know what happened to the records but I still have the turntable..Garrard Z200B. And I still USE it!!
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N7DCR
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2009, 12:17:47 PM »

When I started out in 1976,Morse Code was still a requirement for Novice exam @5WPM.Took General Class exam a year or so later and 13 WPM was required.What I did was copy on paper for about 4 hours per day prior to my exam.My copy rate was probably close to 22 WPM.I made it a point to try to copy someone faster than myself.My sending improved once on the air making QSO's.There is nothing like on air CW send to improve in this area.Sending to yourself or practice partner is not the same as being in QSO!..Good luck and happy CW!...73.N7DCR.
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W4KVW
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Posts: 491




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« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2009, 03:52:43 PM »

I used a program called "CODE QUICK" & learned it in 8 evenings at 2 hours per evening.Passed the test with STRAIGHT COPY!GREAT program but I HATE CODE.I only learned it so I could UPGRADE & it's RARE that I EVER use it since it gives me a headache.I would rather use SSB "ANY DAY or NIGHT"!

Clayton
W4KVW
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WA4OTL
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2009, 08:57:42 PM »

I was 12 years old and wanting to move from CB radio to Ham radio. Learning Morse code was for the birds in my opinion. Since it separated me from what I wanted, I buckled down and began to memorize the letters and numbers.

I had a Sears shortwave radio and would tune in a CW station and pick out the characters I could recognize. For about 2 weeks I wrote down nothing but garbage - maybe an occasional word. Then one night I suddenly realized I had copied a whole paragraph of code with no mistake. That was a huge break through.

I got my Novice license and like others, due to finances, ended up in the CW bands for several years using a Heathkit HW-16. After those years CW was a second language and I've never really enjoyed voice modes except when mobile.

I consider myself bi-lingual and have told my wife if I'm ever paralyzed and can only move a finger or twitch an eyelid, don't forget I know Morse.


Bill
WA4OTL
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VE6TL
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #25 on: April 18, 2009, 11:33:20 AM »

I learned CW in the early 70s from LPs but found I quickly memorized everything.  I then bought a surplus British air force receiver (R1155) which tuned down to VLF and picked up submarines in the U.S. Navy.  They frequently sent each other cypher groups which consisted of 5 characters/numbers randomly selected in a series of about 25 or 30 groups, all at the same speed.  Then they would change speeds and send another batch.  Obviously, I didn't have the "answer sheet" but after a while, starting at 7 or 8 wpm I was able to copy 10 wpm and get my general license.  It wasn't long after that, that I improved my speed a lot just by listening to the submarines.  I guess there wasn't much to do in those subs so practicing CW filled in the time.  
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N2EY
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« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2009, 04:53:25 AM »

VE6CNU - I don't think you were listening to submarines. I don't think they were equipped to transmit on VLF, nor while submerged. In any case they'd normally observe radio silence to avoid giving themselves away.

I think what you were listening to was the high powered VLF stations at Jim Creek, WA and Cutler ME (the latter is NAA), which existed to transmit *to* the USN sub fleet. VLF was used because it could be received anywhere in the world, even when submerged. The coded groups were simply telling the various subs that everything was OK and to continue on their missions. In the event of a drill, or a war, the coded groups would tell various subs to carry out particular sealed orders and/or come to the surface to get further instructions.  

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K1BXI
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Posts: 812




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« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2009, 11:55:35 AM »

You guys are making me feel old......I was in the  Cutler area before and during the construction in 1958. There were a lot of hams that worked at the site. I'm pretty sure the megawatt antenna tuner was designed by a ham. Basically just a BIG L network feeding a top loaded vertical antenna with miles and miles of ground radials. A North and a South array each with a 1300' center tower.

I already had my license at the time and mastered the Morse code to 15 wpm by listening to the Ameco 78 rpm records. (I still have that blue album, but nothing to play it on!)

John
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2805




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« Reply #28 on: April 19, 2009, 12:49:04 PM »

Jim Creek is/was NLK.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K1BXI
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Posts: 812




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« Reply #29 on: April 19, 2009, 02:08:50 PM »

I should have said like a top hat, not top loaded.
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