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Author Topic: Correct Solder Temperature for SMD Components?  (Read 7629 times)
AB0RE
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Posts: 293




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« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2013, 10:29:51 PM »

Too cold. You have to remember that if a fine tip starts at say 600, it will quickly cool 50 to 75 degrees or more as you melt solder/flux and heat surfaces to take solder. Again you want enough heat to do it quickly and get off to minimize component heating. Using too low a temp will actual heat soak components more as it takes longer to heat joint properly. 

Yep - that's what I noticed when I tried it at 500 degrees tonight - seemed a bit cold and didn't appear to be getting good "liquid" solder joints and I had to bump it up a bit. 
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W9GB
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« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2013, 04:42:36 AM »

A number of SMT soldering videos can be found on the Internet or YouTube.
http://solderingtraining.com/

BEST Soldering has several video demonstrations on YouTube.
http://www.solder.net/

Proper conductive soldering is more than TIP Temperature.
Tip Profile, Tip Size, and Solder formulation (alloy mixture) are key criteria in determining the correct temperature.

As mentioned earlier, pre-heating PC board is quite popular for SMT work.

For General (non critical conductive soldering), I suggest staying within 650 to 750 degrees F with lead-free and 60/40 or 63/37 lead solder formulations.
IF you can not properly solder in that temperature range -- then issue is likely your criteria selected OR insufficient training.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 04:50:34 AM by W9GB » Logged
KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2013, 07:47:27 AM »

It cannot be done correctly with just a soldering iron and you risk damaging the circuit board.  Rosin core solder is also verbotten.  The rosin acts like a slow motion acid that will damage the board.

When done, I simply wash the board with readily available flux solvent spray. j

Works great.

Quote
To do it correctly, the board is warmed slowly with controlled temperatures, rather than fast and hot.  Typically, the underside of the board is warmed to just below the melting point of the solder, around 150C, then the component side is heated simultaneously and the components is removed, then there's a cool down period as well.  All this is done thru high magnification microscope with a mechanical mechanism to place the component in the exact position without displacing surrounding components.

If I could upload a 4 MB file, I would show you a Powerpoint presentation one of our staff did that shows how to do it properly with temperatures, etc.  Here's link to the machine we use with a video showing the machine in action: http://www.pdr-rework.com/node/69



One must realize that a compromise must be made when the need to prototype, repair or, in the case of the Radio Amateur, homebrew a single unit for one's own uses. 

While I have used nothing much more than a good needlepoint regulated iron, headband magnifier, tweezers, eutectic solder, solder-wick, chipquik for certain removal tasks that involve more than a two pin device in prototyping various boards in development, initial testing or initial programming work, those prototypes are NOT what happens with final production boards at all, that is a "next stage" production issue and is typically jobbed out to outfits that specialize in SMT board population and manufacturing techniques such as you quote here.  As well they should. 

That said, I have plenty of examples of SMT prototypes, one-offs for my own uses, the occasional one-off custom work that price precludes use of mass production techniques, all have weathered the test of time very well, all were assemble by hand by yours truly just as described. 

And try your best to make 'em all look pretty. 

I have always maintained that the key issue in hand soldering of any type is resolved with practice, practice and more practice at the art and science of hand assembly soldering. 

73
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K0IZ
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« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2013, 08:15:28 AM »

A couple of years ago I purchased a hot air desoldering unit.  Made removal of SMT's easy without damaging either part or board.  Away went my solder wick and frustrations.  Quite a number of units available on eBay, some even under $40.  Probably not up to commercial duty requirements, but adequate for ham use.  Practice by removing parts from some junk PC boards, and reinstalling.
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W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2013, 10:47:42 AM »

A couple of years ago I purchased a hot air desoldering unit.  Made removal of SMT's easy without damaging either part or board.  Away went my solder wick and frustrations.  Quite a number of units available on eBay, some even under $40.  Probably not up to commercial duty requirements, but adequate for ham use.  Practice by removing parts from some junk PC boards, and reinstalling.

They are nice to have. I used a Pace brand station many years ago to desolder and hot air solder some too but there was still times I would still use some wick.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2407




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« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2013, 10:48:55 AM »

One el cheapo method for warming boards is a coffee mug warmer.  You can get them for about ten bucks at wally world or dollar stores!  Just set the board on top.

There are at least a dozen ways to accomplish SMD soldering at home, all equally effective.  You don't have to spend a fortune, and it can easily be done with ju st a soldering pen.  YouTube has many demos.

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