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Author Topic: Restringing dial cord  (Read 6763 times)
K2OWK
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Posts: 1065




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« on: March 06, 2013, 04:27:27 PM »

I mentioned this in my last post, but thought I would ask again in a new post. I need to restring a dial cord in my National NC-98 radio. I have an excellent restringing dial cord guide for this radio. It looks easy, but I am finding it difficult. Does anyone have a procedure I could follow to make it easier? I will be using the original dial cord which has the proper length and end loop. (It came off when the tension spring came loose).

Thanks

K2OWK
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3900




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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2013, 05:26:24 PM »

This is one area where you need to be patient and or flexible.  To use the original dial string is going to require patience unless the 98 has a tensioner arm with a wide latitude of adjustment because of small changes in tension from the original wind. 

Sometimes it's better to start off with new string and wind it according to the diagram which is the "flexible" part of this solution. 

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K2OWK
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Posts: 1065




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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2013, 09:43:22 PM »

Just for information the 98 has a tension-er spring connected to the large wheel. It has three hole positions for tension. The main tuning cord is connected to the spring in the middle hole. I am going to start there.

73s

K2OWK
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2013, 05:53:27 AM »

Just for information the 98 has a tension-er spring connected to the large wheel. It has three hole positions for tension. The main tuning cord is connected to the spring in the middle hole. I am going to start there.

73s

K2OWK

The spring tensioner is usually they place where I both start AND stop, as that is typically where the string gets knotted. 

But don't attempt to stretch the spring while winding, use it afterwards to take up slack. 

« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 05:55:33 AM by KE3WD » Logged
W6OU
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Posts: 191




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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2013, 09:34:02 AM »

I suggest you get a stiff wire and bend a hook at the end. This tool is handy for routing the string around. Cut some small strips of masking tape and have them handy. Whenever you loop around a pulley, loosely apply a bridge of tape on the pulley to prevent the string from slipping off. Start from the end which doesn't have the spring. Finally slip a small screwdriver tip into the spring loop, stretch the spring, and lever the loop over the tab. Then remove all tape.
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WB2EOD
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Posts: 219




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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2013, 05:51:38 PM »

Try this, when routing the cord around a pulley, apply a small piece of tape to keep the cord from falling off.  You can also apply tape to other points along the path to hold things in place while you restring.
Use a needle nose pliers instead of your fingers.  Put the string in the jaws and hold them shut with a rubber band around the handle.  A self locking surgical clamp is also a good tool.
The real trick is PATIENCE.  A dial cord mechanism is a licensed practicing bitch and you have to be patient and resourceful

Hope this helps
73
WB2EOD
 
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KA5N
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Posts: 4380




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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2013, 06:49:24 PM »

Just don't give up when you get the thing strung and you sure it is correct except that the
dial tunes backwards. 
It happens to us all, just start over.

Allen KA5N
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KAPT4560
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Posts: 84




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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2013, 03:59:24 PM »

 It may be easiest with the chassis out of the cabinet and the meter removed. Handle with care. Anything to give you more room.
 A small automotive seal pick with a hooked end is also a useful tool as the needlenose requires you to pinch the string to hold it.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1065




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« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2013, 02:53:26 PM »

I would like to thank all who helped me with this problem. I used original type dial cord (.028 dia). It took me about 10 tries and many cut fingers to get it restrung, but it was all worth it. The National NC-98 is restored and working great. Now that I learned the technique, it should take me much less time on the next one (if there is a next one).
73s

K2OWK
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3900




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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2013, 07:43:27 AM »

OWK:  Thank you for the sitrep.  It's always appreciated when someone comes back to the forum and reports success in solving a problem.

It's always better to report how the problem was eventually solved which of course includes reasons for any failures or listing the difficulties.  This is how most of us learn and perhaps help someone in the future.

Al - K8AXW
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