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Author Topic: Rigs with good noise blankers  (Read 3680 times)
AF5CC
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« on: March 12, 2013, 07:30:36 PM »

I have a really bad noise on 17m (and sometimes other bands) that really makes it hard to hear signals at times.  It sounds like some sort of electrical crud from consumer electronics, or something like that.  It might be powerline noise, but I really don't think so.  Anyways, I know the best solution is to remove the source of the noise, but that isn't always possible. 

What rigs have good noise blankers that take out electrical types of noise?  I know the Yaesu FT100D is pretty good at it.  What other rigs have you used that worked good.  The FT100D is getting kind of hard to fine used nowadays.

Any suggestions or experiences would be most welcome!

John AF5CC
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W9PMZ
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 07:34:57 PM »

Icom7000
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M6GOM
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 07:52:04 PM »

Icom7000

Seconded. My Icom 7000 NB is better than my Kenwood TS590. I think most 7xxx series Icoms are good. Flex also seems to have a very very good NB.

Alternatively look at something like a MFJ 1026 and put it inline.
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VA2FSQ
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 11:18:57 PM »

Yes the MFJ or the DX engineering NCC-1.  Here's my experience
http://va2fsq.com/wp-content/uploads/2013-Jan-15-20-43-43.avi

 Best noise blanker around!
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VA2FSQ
HB9PJT
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2013, 03:25:47 AM »

Kenwood rigs have very good noise blankers. Look here for the TS-590: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opHgOxl7Ojk

73, Peter - HB9PJT
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SWMAN
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2013, 03:59:54 AM »

The NB button on my Kenwood TS-570 does nothing at all. It is the exactly the same with it on or off. That is my only complaint with my 14 year old 570.
Jim. 73. W5JJG
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K0OD
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2013, 04:05:07 AM »

Quote
"the best solution is to remove the source of the noise,"

I'd rate buying a new radio as the worst solution for dealing with the noise. What happens if that new $2,000 radio is even worse?

How long have you had the noise?  How close are you to your neighbors. Have you checked everything within your control?  Have you tried DFing it?  What antenna do you use on 17? The list could go on and on.

My longtime experience is that most noise problems like that eventually go away on their own. There are other bands, too.   

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W1JKA
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2013, 04:14:06 AM »

  ICOM-7200 Check the reviews,first rig I've had that both NR and NB actually work.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 05:15:37 AM »

It depends very much on the waveform shape of the noise signal. A noise blanker can be quite effective against one noise source and worthless for another. My IC756PRO noise blanker will completely kill the power line noise on one day and do nothing the next day - depending on the weather factors that affect the arcing out on the power pole. I'd hesitate to buy a transceiver based on someone else's experience against his particular noise source.

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NK7Z
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2013, 05:19:06 AM »

756 PRO II or 756 PRO III NB is good...  Also, the Yaesu FT-900 has a really solid NB in it as well...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
WA3SKN
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« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2013, 06:38:55 AM »

Actually, you will find that most of the rigs have adjustable parameters for the noise blanker... deep in the bowels of the menu systems.  And the noise type encountered determines how well the default values work!  But it is best to find the source and fix it rather than use the noise blanker, if possible.
73s.

-Mike.
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AF5CC
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« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2013, 07:23:04 AM »

  ICOM-7200 Check the reviews,first rig I've had that both NR and NB actually work.

I was going to ask about the Icom 7200, as I think it uses the same NB as the 7000 (which others suggested) and it is a little cheaper than the 7000, appears more rugged and easier to use.  So it does a good job on noise?

73 John AF5CC
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AF5CC
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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2013, 07:25:41 AM »

It depends very much on the waveform shape of the noise signal. A noise blanker can be quite effective against one noise source and worthless for another. My IC756PRO noise blanker will completely kill the power line noise on one day and do nothing the next day - depending on the weather factors that affect the arcing out on the power pole. I'd hesitate to buy a transceiver based on someone else's experience against his particular noise source.

Yes, isn't that the truth!  The NB in my Icom 706 original actually does really good on the noises that show up on 2m, 12m, and 15m.  Almost completely remove it. Doesn't do much of anything on the 17m noise.

73 John AF5CC
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K8AC
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« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2013, 07:47:14 AM »

There are many good noise blanker implementations, dating back to the Drake TR7, that are fairly effective at minimizing various types of impulse noise.  But, one thing that few understand or mention - there are side effects that can be rather unpleasant. Typically, with the NB activated on a band with many strong signals, you'll hear phantom signals that you might think are splatter caused by a dirty transmitter, but the signals are actually being produced in the receiver as a result of the NB being on.  There just isn't any free lunch - the best thing to do is to try and get the noise source eliminated.  Second best approach may be to use one of the noise cancellation devices such as the MFJ-1026 which can be effective in the right circumstances.  But if the noise is coming from multiple directions, that method may not produce good results.

73, K8AC
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NR4C
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« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2013, 08:10:19 AM »

It depends on exactly what type of noise you are trying to get rid of.

Several good solutions have already been described, but it's better to get rid of the noise, and often cheaper as it may be someone else's real problem.  Buying a new rig should be the last resort, unless of course this is your way of getting past the finacial manager (spouse) in which case i'll shut up.

Many recent rigs have good NB circucits and most offer some adjustments, to handle different types of noises.

Try before you buy.

...bill  nr4c
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