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Author Topic: Checking for 6 Meter Propagation  (Read 139513 times)
AB9TA
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Posts: 19




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« on: March 14, 2013, 07:46:42 PM »

Since all the US broadcasters have gone to digital, I believe there are few, if any, television channels left on CH 2, 3, or 4, so the ol' reliable way to check conditions on 6 meters isn't available anymore..
Other than spotter websites, what's the best way to keep an eye (or ear) on 6?

73!
Bill AB9TA
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W4OP
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Posts: 393


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2013, 08:25:30 PM »

There are hundreds of 6M CW beacons.

Dale W4OP
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KG6YV
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Posts: 506




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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2013, 11:56:24 AM »

Try Googling DX MAPs.  This site provides real time (updates every 3 minute) views of any ham band in HF/VHF for worldwide or pick your continent.  THe database looks at DX clusters and Weak signal data and the window can be configured by ontinent or a world view.

Greg
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WA2TPU
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Posts: 208




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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2013, 02:05:24 PM »

The previous posters have given some real good information on how and where to get an idea pertaining to what's going on with 6 meters. Specifically, I use the DX Summit website plus I really like the N3TUQ's DX Map.
Truly 6 Meters is a magical and fickle band with great possibilities of RARE DX. Openings on 6 Meters should be happening much more now as we head towards the peak of this current cycle. Have FUN on 6.
Best regards with many 72...73.
   Don sr. --WA2TPU --
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W5DQ
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2013, 03:03:53 PM »

All you need is http://www.dxmaps.com/spots/map.php?Lan=E&Frec=50&ML=M&Map=NA&DXC=N&HF=N&GL=N and the ability to copy CW for beacons. With that, if there is any 6M activity into your area, you should be able to see and hear it.

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
N7TEE
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Posts: 39




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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2013, 07:44:06 AM »

Bill,

The way I do it is to turn on the FT-625 and let it run all day.  I leave it on 50.125 Mhz.  That way I can get anything that is in the neighborhood.  Of course I can hear anywhere in the house. 


Dave
N7TEE
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N6ORB
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2013, 03:44:40 PM »

OK, so now everyone knows about DXMaps (previously known as DX Sherlock). This lets you know about QSOs that have already taken place. However, there's another site I use that shows the plot from an ionosonde in northern Utah. If the ionosonde data display shows there's an E cloud there, I put my antenna up and point it northeast from the SF Bay area and start calling CQ. Often enough to make it worthwhile, I make a contact.

Here's the URL: http://www.spacenv.com/secblo/BLO/cadi/index.html

If there's an E cloud overhead, the ionosonde will show a horizontal red line just above the 100 km level. If you're located west of the Rockies and DXMaps isn't showing anything, point your antenna toward northern Utah and call CQ. You may find it works for you too.

Now, the ionosonde can tell you something about what's going on in the F layer as well. If I see clear arcs plotted, hf is probably in pretty good shape. However, when the A and K indexes are high, the plot  will seem to be little more than random dots.

Check it out. You may find the site as helpful for you as it's been for me.

Dave, N6ORB
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VA7VO
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2013, 07:22:04 AM »

You can also listen on 10 meters for short skip into your area, this is a good indicator that 6 will soon open.
Considering we have already hit our peak on this cycle this one is pretty much a bust.
We had a good opening a few days ago and of course my 6 meter rig was not ready.
Up here in the PNW 6 meter openings are not as frequent as they are on the other side of the rockies.
Keep an eye on the SFI and watch the A index for a moderate rise with low K. This perhaps will give you a chance.
Back when i started in 75', 6 meters was open pretty much every day at some point.
Keep the radio on and call once in a while on .125 you never know. If we all listen and don't call it becomes quite sloooow.

Glenn, VA7VO
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K0LGI
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2013, 05:06:34 PM »

Several weeks ago it was asked in this forum if there were any remaining TV stations operating in the US after the DTV changeover. True there are few if any of significance remaining using analog TV now, however there are a great number that converted to DTV channel 2 stations that are operating in the US at a variety of power levels and locations including the border regions of Canada and Mexico.

By monitoring the DTV 2 pilot carriers at 54.309 MHz, has been a valuable source of continuous signals available in my areas of the US that will provide good indication of meteor, sporadic E and tropospheric enhanced propagation. This refers only to DTV channel 2, however any of the lower channels 2-6 are worth listening for the pilot carriers using the same offset (309 KHz) above the lower edge of the channel frequency.

Almost live meteor, sporadic E returns including orbiting space craft returns can be observed on a variety of other frequencies that are in use at my location in Iowa and also from New Mexico receivers at http://www.roswellmeteor.com/default.htm

For a listing of the most recent DTV 2 channel station list from the FCC, go to http://transition.fcc.gov/fcc-bin/tvq?state=&call=&arn=&city=&chan=02&cha2=02&serv=&type=0&facid=&list=1&dist=&dlat2=&mlat2=&slat2=&dlon2=&mlon2=&slon2=&size=9

Denny - K0LGI
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NO2A
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Posts: 758




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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2013, 07:39:57 PM »

I tune my car radio to a fringe frequency where there`s usually no signal. When the band opens I`ll hear 2-3 stations on the same freq. Checking for short skip on 10m works also. Or if you have an old cb leave it on channel 19.
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KL7AJ
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« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2013, 12:46:59 PM »

NON-us TV stations are a good bet!

Eric
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KO1D
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Posts: 384




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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2013, 06:43:00 AM »

NON-us TV stations are a good bet!

Eric

I second this. I see you are in Chicago. Not sure how well it works but some of the biggest guns on 6m back east listen for the South American and European TV stations on 40Mhz. *I want to say around 47-49MHz but I am willing to be wrong on that.*
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WA9UAA
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Posts: 312




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« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2013, 10:26:11 AM »

http://www.dxmaps.com/spots/map.php?Lan=E&Frec=50&ML=M&Map=NA
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W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 323




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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2013, 06:12:03 PM »

I like the beacons idea. Maybe put a couple three freqs in the memory presets for beacons. They are going all the time and are on 6, not some other band that may or may not mean you have good 6M.  Actually beacons are a good idea on 10, too.  I have tried the checking CB to see if 10 is open. But on CB you got people with big amps and thousands more operators,  I have heard CB be solid noise, and no one is working 10 because it sounds dead because everyone is listening, not calling? 
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