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Author Topic: Small Rohn tower question  (Read 968 times)
K7MDO
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Posts: 325




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« on: March 20, 2013, 07:21:45 AM »

I acquired an old Rohn tower. It has four sections that are eight feet in length. And the bottom section has legs that splay out to a triangle about two feet on a side.  

It has a Rohn label but no model number.

My question is, since I don't see guy points that have been used, is it possible to free stand it?   Of course on a concrete base.

Tom
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KF7CG
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Posts: 827




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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2013, 09:28:51 AM »

Sounds like one of Rohn's "BX" series: BX, HBX, HDBX. These are designed to be free standing towers if given an adequate concrete base. They have the disadvantage of being susceptible to damage from high antenna torque loads. They tend to be somewhat marginal for full size three element tri-banders.

KF7CG
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K7MDO
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2013, 03:45:28 PM »

Yes, I think it does look mostly like those units in the Rohn site.   It just seems a little 'flimsy' for free standing and that is why I asked.  At the base I expected pretty good size bolt holes but found on a pair of 1/4" holes in each foot... seemed a little light for free standing.

My use is only as a distant support for a long wire antenna and it would only be vertically weight loaded and quite lightly.  I plan to put a pulley in the top of the tower for the antenna support line to travel through then on to the old cherry tree at 45 degrees with a counter weight there.  Should be OK but side wind loads would be the issue I worried most about.

I guess trying it and making sure the lateral fall line is clear of anything like plants that the wife wants to keep is then all there is to worry about.

Thanks, Tom

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WN2C
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2013, 07:21:41 PM »

Are you sure it's not part of a Hy-Gain Hytower?
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WB5ITT
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Posts: 100




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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2013, 08:03:02 PM »

The HY-Tower is a HyGain antenna, NOT a Rohn product.....The HY-Tower looks nothing like a HDX tower..looks more like the 20/25G series (is tubular)..and has the stubs along the side for the different bands

The HBX series are meant for light wind loads.....TV antennas and small VHF/UHF yagis..if you guy it, it could support a little more....using it as a support for a wire antenna will be excellent...In areas where you get hurricanes, etc, I wouldnt recommend a HBX when a 25G or better can be found for reasonable prices..
« Last Edit: March 20, 2013, 08:05:16 PM by WB5ITT » Logged
K7MDO
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Posts: 325




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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2013, 08:22:06 PM »

Willamette valley, Oregon... no wind since 1963.

It has a Rohn label... just no part number... it will work fine from what has been said,  thanks very much.

Tom
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2013, 09:18:03 AM »

The HY-Tower is a HyGain antenna, NOT a Rohn product.....The HY-Tower looks nothing like a HDX tower..looks more like the 20/25G series (is tubular)..and has the stubs along the side for the different bands

The HBX series are meant for light wind loads.....TV antennas and small VHF/UHF yagis..if you guy it, it could support a little more....using it as a support for a wire antenna will be excellent...In areas where you get hurricanes, etc, I wouldnt recommend a HBX when a 25G or better can be found for reasonable prices..

Actually, the Hy-Gain Hy-Tower absolutely is a Rohn BX tower, always has been and still is.  The Hy-Tower "legs" are stamped/forged, not tubular and the "X" braces are riveted in place.  The 18HT starts out life as a Rohn (used to be "Spaulding") model BX-24, made of three 8' Rohn BX sections, which taper. 
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2013, 09:31:17 AM »

Quote from: K7MDO

Willamette valley, Oregon... no wind since 1963.



Yeah, right...  We had one storm that blew our greenhouse 1/8 mile across the
neighbor's field and pushed the tractor shed over 18" - including the tractor
parked inside.  That was about 1995.

But if it can support an 18HT with the upper 80m extension it should be fine
for one end of a wire.
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