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Author Topic: Ham and Emcomm  (Read 4335 times)
KT0DD
Member

Posts: 277




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« on: March 24, 2013, 02:06:25 PM »

I just had an amusing thought. Where I live, our county emcomms have migrated to the 800mhz systems and use 70cm amateur for initiation and logistics of an emergency callout.

One of the main logistic tasks communicated on ham radio is whether or not to go to the storage area and check out the 800 mhz radios which the emergency responders don't take home. By the time all the logistical ops have been discussed on ham radio, I have a very good general picture of the emergency situation.

Who says ham radio has no place in emcomms. you can always use it to tell someone to go get the "real" radios....Hi Hi.

73. Todd - KT0DD
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 210




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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2013, 07:37:07 PM »

Ha! I love it!

There is an emergency, here are the details, here is the plan, now go get the non-hams radios so that I can repeat this message.  If you are unable to copy on the government radios, all hams are welcome to reach me on THIS frequency. 

There is this though that government radios are always better.  Better at what is a question:

Back in the stone age, I had some time between missions and (I was Army) & remember being up on our hill, watching some Air Force guys with a hand crank 'emergency' radio trying to communicate with a station about 15 miles away. We could all see the the station itself through the haze, down on the flats.  I was -at the same time- talking simplex/ham on 2 meters to a retiree who lived about 60 miles away - perhaps on the very fringe of line of site, even from our tall hill.  When the officer in charge of the Air Force exercise finally gave-up in exasperation and irritatedly asked me WHY I was able to talk to my friend so far away everyday using a hand-hald and a home made/fold-out beam, while their government radio, which obviously cost a ton of money - was basically useless, I showed him the manufacturer's nomenclature plate on back of my hand-held radio and told him: "It's Japanese.". He looked like he was going to puke.

ha ha -

Thanks for posting -

de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._
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KB8VUL
Member

Posts: 105




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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2013, 07:34:01 PM »

And the minute that you as a ham go grab the commercial radio and start talking on it it's no longer ARES.  Nothing Amateur about an 800Mhz trunked system at all. 

Again, if we need to not be using ham radio to replace commercial radio services. 
If the county wants to house 800 trunked subscribers for hams to use they need to pony up for some commercial VHF or UHF pagers and issue them to the volunteers and page them out with them. 

This situation as you describe goes WAY over the line of commercial communications on ham radio in my opinion.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5889




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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2013, 04:25:36 AM »

When I was one of the ones in charge of comms for a local EMA, I had an EMA radio issued to me for use 24/7.  If other communications were necessary, telephone and cell phone use was encouraged.  AAMOF, phones were the first thing used, with radio being used only when absolutely necessary.
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KB8VUL
Member

Posts: 105




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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2013, 02:55:47 PM »

If you were in charge of the local EMA then I assume you were the EMA director.  Meaning that you were a paid public employee.  News flash, you can't be using ham radio as part of your job.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5889




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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2013, 03:58:05 AM »

No, 'VUL, I was not the director.  Look closer at the post I made.  I was in charge of communications, a sort of radio officer, and I was an unpaid volunteer.  I am full well aware of the prohibition of using ham radio while being paid by an employer.
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KT0DD
Member

Posts: 277




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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2013, 06:20:42 AM »

Reading mis-comprehension and the "I am right and you are wrong" power and control illness is the norm here on eham. you just have to filter through it.

I've often wondered what part of UNPAID volunteer SAR operators using Amateur Radio for search and rescue IN AN EMERGENCY SITUATION was illegal? Some people need to re-read the part 97 rules after they take a reading comprehension class.

73.
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KB8VUL
Member

Posts: 105




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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2013, 08:15:01 PM »

Well, when someone comments that they were in charge of something in a government organization, it means they are a gumbment employee. 

UNpaid vollies are just that, unpaid vollies.  And depending on what sort of volunteer you are regulates what passes for legal.

SAR and CERT yeah, they are both unpaid.  They are volunteer groups, and technically they are not breaking that rule.  The rule on using ham instead of another class of radio communications, that' the one I am referring to.  Because if you really want to split hairs, volunteer fire departments could use ham for fire ground operations and anything else that a dispatcher was not involved in unless the dispatcher was also a volunteer and was unpaid.  Then we could have fire calls going out over the local ham repeater.  Now as stupid as that may sound, take a set back and consider that SAR and CERT are classified through FEMA and Homeland Security as FIRST RESPONDERS.  Same classification given to fire brigades and police officers.  ARES, and ham operators are NOT classified this way.  At no point are ARES members required to register with FEMA or the local county or state for insurance coverage while deployed.  CERT I know for a fact takes an oath to the state and country, at least in Ohio.  They are required to register with the State of Ohio as a first responder for liability purposes.  They are required to take ICS 100, 700 and one other one that I can't remember.  These are REQUIREMENTS set by the government not the local ARES group.  Their primary point of communication is with police and fire (served agencies) not with some ham that is acting as liaison to them.  So yes, I take issue with the idea of these groups using ham radio and not public safety radios for their communications.  And it's no different in my mind than dispatching a volunteer fire department over the local ham repeater.
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K9GOO
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 02:17:04 PM »

I am a Ham and a vollie SAR.
If I have a family member out missing I want any group to have every tool.

All of our operational people are Tech or above, and we have mou's with all the repeater owners.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5889




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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2013, 09:16:04 AM »

In case you missed it, 'VUL, I said I was issued an agency radio.  NOT a ham radio.  Please don't read things into what others say, it makes you look like a fool.
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