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Author Topic: Net Interference  (Read 6137 times)
KF7Z
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Posts: 36




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« on: March 29, 2013, 08:00:50 AM »

While working on a project, just for come background distraction, I was listening to a three way roundtable on 80 meters yesterday evening. From the conversation, I think I am correct in concluding that these were three experienced operators with a high level of skill. 

After they a while an East Coast net tried to start up on exactly the same frequency. The net operators seemed to ignore the QSO in progress, but a battle was then on. The three-way ops devoted about 80 percent of the next hour to fighting with various net check-ins. Some check-ins rose to the bait and asked the three if they would move to another frequency. One of the three ranted for a long time about he had confirmed with the ARRL that the net ops were in the wrong, and his group had been camped on the frequency for the last four hours, and were going to stay on it until the net moved. He also looked up the bylaws of this net and read, on the air, those sections of the bylaws that emphasized net courtesy. In the meantime, I scanned up and down the bands a few tens of kHz, and there seemed to be many clear alternate frequencies. although you can never be sure what others are hearing. 

I understand that the net ops were incorrect if they started up on the frequency already in use, but is this bickering really appropriate? It sure seems that it would have been much less bother for these three fellows to ease up on their "rights" and move up or down the band a little. The energy and angst that they devoted to the fight was much greater than the effort that it would have taken to move.

What is the consensus here?  Would you encourage your QSO in-progress to move off of a net frequency?
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W1JKA
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2013, 08:31:25 AM »

   The few nets I listen in on are pretty well established and seldom have the problem you describe,the few times that a qso was on frequency at start up time the net controller I.D. himself and politely requested the frequency for the net.The very few times that the qso held firm,the net controller simply moved up or down a few khz.No problem.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 08:45:30 AM »

I no longer operate on 80 and seldom on the 40m SSB frequencies ..... but when I did I've encountered these "net frequencies."  I ususally moved out of courtesy, understanding that nets provide great fun for several guys and in some cases through their "meetings" they are training for public service. As for them moving, it can be done but sometimes it's difficult or very awkward to move an entire net.  

Personally, I think they should have some kind of understanding with net participants that if "their"  frequency is in use that they are to move up or down as necessary.

If the NCS acts like an A..hole when he requests the frequency you can pretty well bet the fight is on.  Most hams are understanding and accommodating if talked to in a courteous  manner but understandably don't like to be pushed around by rude people who think the "own" a frequency.

Then there are those who deliberately and with premeditation will start a QSO on known net frequencies just to create a problem or make a point.





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N3DF
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 11:08:36 AM »

Wow, go figure.  A problem with a net frequency on 75 in the evening.  Never saw that one coming.
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Neil N3DF
KF7Z
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Posts: 36




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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 01:15:53 PM »

Wow, go figure.  A problem with a net frequency on 75 in the evening.  Never saw that one coming.

But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?
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W8JX
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 01:38:56 PM »

Wow, go figure.  A problem with a net frequency on 75 in the evening.  Never saw that one coming.

But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?

The 3 stooges were in the wrong but it is the mentality of many on 80m. I very rarely use that band. Last time was field day. 
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3827




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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 01:53:27 PM »

7Z: 
Quote
But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?

I would explain that there are nets that occupy certain frequencies, especially on 75m and these people get upset when someone uses "their" frequency at net time. 

I would suggest they simply move off frequency and continue enjoying ham radio rather than getting into a pissing contest with this kind of operator.  Life is too short for unnecessary hassles.

I would also point out that for the most part hams are the greatest people on earth.





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G3RZP
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2013, 02:26:35 PM »

To my mind, just because the "XYZ A****les" net always meets on this frequency at this time, if others are actually using the frequency at that time, it is tough sh*t on the net. They can move.

They may politely ask the current users of the frequency to move: if they don't or won't, it's "first come, first served".

Nets should not have priority - unless they REALLY have urgency/distress/ priority traffic.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2013, 03:32:32 PM »

But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?

I'd show that new user why CW is worth learning and so much fun. 


73
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N3DF
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Posts: 252




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« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2013, 05:22:03 PM »

To my mind, just because the "XYZ A****les" net always meets on this frequency at this time, if others are actually using the frequency at that time, it is tough sh*t on the net. They can move.

They may politely ask the current users of the frequency to move: if they don't or won't, it's "first come, first served".

Nets should not have priority - unless they REALLY have urgency/distress/ priority traffic.

Absolutely.  A net that has met nightly for decades with dozens of check-ins should dissolve on a very busy band if 3 guys got to their frequency a few minutes early. 
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Neil N3DF
K5TED
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Posts: 727




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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2013, 05:27:06 PM »

Very similar to contesters who grab 14.230 on the big day, then get all bent up because some SSTV'ers want to use the de facto gentlemanly agreed upon 20m SSTV slot.

Net control should have asked if the freq was in use. Three stooges should have said "Yes, but we are gentlemen and understand that this net is not some impromptu ad hoc endeavor, and we'll graciously move up or down, have a nice net".
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VE3FMC
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WWW

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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2013, 05:56:18 AM »

But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?

I'd show that new user why CW is worth learning and so much fun. 


73

Please tell me why I have been operating digital modes and have had a CW net come right on top of my QSO and start operating without asking if the frequency was in use. CW nets do not own a certain frequency anymore than a SSB does.


Nets are just that, a net. IMO if the so called NET frequency is in use there are two things that can happen.

1. The NCS can politely ask the other stations to QSY up or down.

2. If the guys that were using the frequency refuse to move then the NCS asks those that are listening and want to check into the net to move up or down.

No one owns a frequency, whether it be an established net or Joe Ham who is operating on a frequency. Getting into a pissing match really doesn't solve the problem.

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KG4RUL
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Posts: 2722


WWW

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« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2013, 11:08:31 AM »

But what would you tell a new licensee about how to respond to the situation?

I'd show that new user why CW is worth learning and so much fun. 


73

Please tell me why I have been operating digital modes and have had a CW net come right on top of my QSO and start operating without asking if the frequency was in use. CW nets do not own a certain frequency anymore than a SSB does.


Nets are just that, a net. IMO if the so called NET frequency is in use there are two things that can happen.

1. The NCS can politely ask the other stations to QSY up or down.

2. If the guys that were using the frequency refuse to move then the NCS asks those that are listening and want to check into the net to move up or down.

No one owns a frequency, whether it be an established net or Joe Ham who is operating on a frequency. Getting into a pissing match really doesn't solve the problem.



Interrogative

How would a CW operator convey to the digital operator that a net was starting
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K2VVH
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2013, 01:36:39 PM »

Quote
He also looked up the bylaws of this net and read, on the air, those sections of the bylaws that emphasized net courtesy.

How many nets do you know that have bylaws?  Cheesy
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K5TED
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Posts: 727




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« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2013, 03:03:33 PM »

Once gain, some contesters show their disregard of common courtesy during the CQWWPX. Calling on 14.2985, mucking up the Intercon and Maritime net, arguing with the NCS even though these are well know nets that operate all day every day on 14.300. I could post some callsigns, but it wouldn't do any good because the perps have no shame..
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