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Author Topic: Morse code on a banknote!  (Read 2720 times)
AF3Y
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Posts: 3737




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« on: March 30, 2013, 06:58:28 AM »

Check this...... Grin


http://www.ebay.com/itm/XXX-RARE-3-Cents-note-COMPLETE-MORSE-CODE-ALPHABET-Utica-New-York-1864-/221207813152?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3381035c20

Gene AF3Y
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K0OD
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Posts: 2556




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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2013, 10:56:42 AM »

That's very interesting. During the civil war copper was in short supply. The U.S. also issued steel pennies in 1943. Privately issued cents (called tokens) were in circulation during the civil war period. Merchants often used them for advertising. Many had patriotic themes on one side and an ad for a store on the other. I have some.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_War_token

Few people realize that the U.S. issued "fractional currency" during the 1860s and  1870s. They were redeemable in postage. They're quite attractive and collectable.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US-Fractional_%281st_Issue%29-$0.25-Fr.1280.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_currency

The federal government didn't get into printing large denomination paper money until later. But zillions of varieties of bank notes circulated. I've never seen a "fractional" bank note for just three cents. The Morse is amazing!

I do have a confederate fractional note backed by "cotton redeemable after the ratification of victory."
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2556




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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 07:15:18 PM »

Extremely rare token by the same merchant. He was a "manufacturer and dealer in Telegraph, Chemical and PHILOSOPHICAL apparatus" in Utica NY.

Front:
http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/uploaded/cointagous/20110523_DSC03604.JPG

Reverse, with American Morse alphabet:
http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/uploaded/cointagous/20110523_DSC03605.JPG
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K7RNO
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Posts: 279




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« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2013, 03:40:13 PM »

...and also with the same strange code.
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73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2189




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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2013, 04:55:13 AM »

...and also with the same strange code.

AKA "American Morse" or "Railroad Morse". Not International Morse as you'd usually hear on the ham bands. When I was a new ham I think there were some CW nets on the ham bands that used Railroad Morse, but I cannot recall hearing it on the ham bands in a long long time.

Some of the prosigns and abbreviations we use on the ham bands today have their roots in Railroad Morse. e.g. "BT overbar" for a "break" and "ES" for "and" are similar (not identical) to formally defined punctuation in railroad morse.
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