Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Coax road crossing  (Read 1153 times)
W4GRY
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« on: April 07, 2013, 10:47:10 PM »

Here's a new one for you. I live on the ground floor of a 4 story retirement community. I have received permission to erect a vertical or a hexbeam on a pushup mast on the edge of the property line. (I'm on the back side of the facility and facing woods so I can't be seen from the road.) There is a paved road for the parking spaces between my apartment and the antenna site. My delimma is how can I get my coax feed across this road? I have one solution which envolves the management installing a speed bump with a 2" steel pipe inside...something I'm not hopeful they would do. We do need the speed bump however before someone gets hit. Perhaps there is a better idea? Can't go across in the air.
Logged
N7BMW
Member

Posts: 114




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2013, 01:16:29 AM »

A long time ago I saw a public utility push a steel pipe under a road.  It involved digging a long ditch perpendicular to the road and using a special kind of jack to push sections of pipe under the road.  As the section of pipe was driven another section was threaded on and so forth. 

I'm sure the process was not cheap but it was a lot cheaper than tearing up the road.  So, the question is: how much are you willing to pay to bury that coax?

PS. Why 2 inch pipe? RG213 is under 1/2 inch and rotator cable is less.
Logged
NN4ZZ
Member

Posts: 36




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2013, 04:01:43 AM »

Power Mole - one method to consider.  Check out the link to see how it works.

http://powermole.com/

I used a company here in GA to install a 2 inch PVC pipe under a 20 foot driveway using their power mole.  They push a rod with a transmitter in the head so they can track and adjust the direction.  The rod is in sections about 3 feet long so they can keep adding as needed.  It came out exactly where planned.  When they pull back the rod it leave a hole for the PVC.   It took them about 3 hours to dig, push, install the PVC and clean up.   

This was in 2006 and the cost was $500.

Al / NN4ZZ
 
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13143




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2013, 02:04:45 PM »

That sounds like what the local cable company used to run a feed to
our house - they went in by the road, ran under a flower bed and
concrete patio, and came up right at the far side beside the box.
Except for hitting our irrigation system in two spots, it was quick and
did the job.

A lot of communications companies use subcontractors for installation
work - see if you can find someone who does it locally and inquire.
I think it took the locals less than an hour.  Make sure you get a locator
out first to mark the power, gas, telephone, and other utility lines (and
the sprinkler system if possible.)

Otherwise check into a concrete or asphalt saw that will cut a slot
across the rod and drop the coax in it, then patch over the top.  It
might only last 5 to 10 years due to settling in the road materials.

Oh, and if there is any chance of pressure on the coax, the solid
dielectrics survive much better than foam types.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5643




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2013, 02:14:18 PM »


Otherwise check into a concrete or asphalt saw that will cut a slot
across the rod and drop the coax in it, then patch over the top.  It
might only last 5 to 10 years due to settling in the road materials.


If you do this I would suggest using the smallest diameter PVC that will fit over it in road as it will protect cable and extend its life.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
KB2WIG
Member

Posts: 115




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2013, 09:36:52 AM »

I've found that a bit of research to find the workers that do a particuloar job, a lunch hour and a franklin or two in the shirt pocket tends to takes care of things.
 Can't hurt to try.

klc
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2332




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2013, 10:24:18 AM »

Why did the coax cross the road?

To get to the other sideband.

*Rimshot*
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12779




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2013, 10:37:58 AM »

Having a company push the PVC pipe under the roadway will probably limit your liability.
Logged
N4KD
Member

Posts: 133




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2013, 11:34:46 AM »

I've seen home irrigation companies use high pressure water to bore out a hole under driveways and walkways. A roadbed might be a little more of a challenge, but it might work.

Get a steel pipe about 1/2" in diameter, and longer than the distance across the road. Put a hose fitting on one end, turn on the water and erode the dirt and gravel away.

- Dave N4KD
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!