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Author Topic: How would you run a pile-up????  (Read 2870 times)
VK3HJ
Member

Posts: 553




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« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2013, 09:30:15 AM »

It is appreciated when the expedition operator sticks with a caller until QSO is completed.
When I get an annoying tailender who keeps on calling over the top before I complete the QSO, I make sure I shift my QSX to dodge him, after completing the QSO he is QRM-ing. Work the rude caller later, if/when it suits you. I ignore partial callsigns.
Keep a rhythm and consistency, so callers know when to call. Send your callsign and split instructions every couple of minutes. Announce the area you are listening for at this time too.
Check your transmit frequency from time to time. Keep your pileup spread within reason, and always check you have sufficient clear space above (or below) your QRG before you start calling. It's bad form to let your pileup run away and steamroll going QSOs.
To give yourself a brief break, execute the macro to send info such as your QSL route, IOTA number, etc. If you need a longer break, announce your QRX duration, and be sure to return when you said you would.
Listen out for calls coming from less populated areas, such as South America, Africa and Oceania, and Asia outside Japan, and when you hear one, QRX the mob and call for any others from these areas as they appear. Listen out for the weaker stations and work them when you can. Send at a suitable speed for the conditions. Often I hear a weak, fluttery signal and really struggle to copy it if the speed is excessive. I like about 25 wpm, as I've only been using CW since morning tea.
On the Low Bands, keep your greyline map open and keep an eye on that.
Work the band until it closes, and hand over to a relief operator when you've had enough. Work to a routine, so callers know when to expect you on a particular band.
I only work CW on DXpedition now. SSB is too much like going to war.
At home, I thin the pileups by spending a bit more time chatting with the caller, rather than just a "5NN TU" type QSO. I find it fascinating how, after someone spots you, how many callers appear that don't hear you!
I've only been DXing since breakfast, and have only been on several DXpeditions, but this is what I've found works for me, and keeps most happy.
Only three weeks till VK9NT expedition. Hear you in the pileups!
73,
Luke VK3HJ
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KH6DC
Member

Posts: 632




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« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2013, 10:38:49 PM »

I would run some prop software in advance and save the files then when at the dxpedition location, call by regions with the highest propagation probabilities.  If North America, go by call districts and always run split.
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
K0IZ
Member

Posts: 737




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« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2013, 04:40:15 AM »

If calling by numbers, remember that all "6's" are not in California.  Etc for other numbers.  Don't work more than 10 or 15 per number before moving to next, since band conditions change.  I have missed some DX where it took forever to get to Zero's, and then band went out.  As KC DX Club says, "zero before one"!
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W2IRT
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Posts: 2596


WWW

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« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2013, 03:28:50 PM »

Your best bet in working NA is to go by regions. East coast, midwest, west coast. Let folks in the transition areas decide where they fit themselves in. All the time following propagation, of course!
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Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
V47JA
Member

Posts: 102




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« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2013, 05:18:27 PM »

Hi,

I try to run a pile-up very calmly, but making sure everyone knows exactly who is in charge. Any other way and you will be exhausted very quickly.  Here is about one minute out of a three hour pile-up:
 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzSSZmvrbo0&feature=youtu.be   

73 and DX,

John V47JA
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W9KDX
Member

Posts: 770




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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2013, 09:30:48 AM »

Only 2 things I would change from what most do.

1.  I would never respond to anyone calling their sign more than once at a time, and I would let them know that.

2.  I would always call NA based on numbers.

This would eliminate most of the mess I always hear these days.
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Sam
W9KDX
K7CO
Member

Posts: 275




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« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2013, 09:49:39 AM »

According to some of the experts, you should never work a pileup by the numbers, by continent is ok if you choose.

"Avoid working by numbers, continents are OK
   When possible, try to avoid subdividing a pileup by numbers. Depending on propagation, try working a whole continent or several continents, or NOT working a particular continent. At times only working by numbers will work, however. Whatever method you choose, be sure to inform the pileup after every QSO.   Don't break your own rule by working your pals in NA if you are asking for "Eu."

http://dx-code.org/DXpednew.html

Some great stuff here.

For me, if I was working a pileup the one thing I would do for sure is not work people who called out of turn. When I called for the Sierra Kilo station, it does NOT mean call if you have just a single Sierra or Kilo in your call.

I also try to work stations that use their full callsigns rather than prefixes or suffixes.

Never thought about marking a station as NIL if he breaks the code, but it sounds like the right thing to do

73
Jon
k7co

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VK3HJ
Member

Posts: 553




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« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2013, 11:17:38 PM »

Never thought about marking a station as NIL if he breaks the code, but it sounds like the right thing to do
73
Jon
k7co

I don't like to do that. It will just mean that down the track, your QSL Manager will be hassled by the offender. He has enough to do!
If a station calls out of turn, I dodge him, and move about in the QSX slot. If he persists, it is time to reprimand that station by callsign. Spend enough time, but not too much doing so, it breaks the rhythm.
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K3NRX
Member

Posts: 1943


WWW

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« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2013, 04:15:11 AM »

Hi,

I try to run a pile-up very calmly, but making sure everyone knows exactly who is in charge. Any other way and you will be exhausted very quickly.  Here is about one minute out of a three hour pile-up:
 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzSSZmvrbo0&feature=youtu.be   

73 and DX,

John V47JA

Great set up Jon!....Those EUs were coming in loud for ya that day too....I like the way you handled things....giving your name, qth and the sig report with a nice rhythm....Not just "59-c-ya!"......You talk about being exhausted....I could never understand this contest mentality of working pileups and worrying about "qso rates" and that sort of thing.....and doing it like it's a race for the roses .....some guys are way too into that and need to back off on the caffeine and amphetamines!...I guess expeditions do that to get as many in the book as possible, but man...some guys out there need to chill a bit too....By the by, it's always great to work you on the bands!.....

V
KA3NRX

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W6OU
Member

Posts: 184




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« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2013, 09:57:40 AM »

Here's one amusing way to handle a tail-ender.  Suppose W6XXX was incessantly calling on top of a station you are trying to copy.  After finishing, say "The XXX station next". After W6XXX replies, say "The XXX station only please all others stand by".  After repeating this several times, say "Sorry XXX you are being QRMed. QRZ anybody else?".
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