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Author Topic: Do contesters make better DX-ped Ops?  (Read 1689 times)
KY6R
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« on: April 11, 2013, 02:57:54 PM »

Some of the best operators on DX-peditions have been notable contesters.

Do you think contesters are the best candidates to go on DX-peditions?

My guess is that contest experience surely helps, but not sure how much.
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N6PSE
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2013, 03:36:23 PM »

Yes, without a doubt serious and focused contesters make the best DXpedition operators.

That said, I am not a contester and consider myself far from the best. The contesters have better ears, concentration and stamina.  The Russian Ops at 7O6T were absolute "Iron Men" and didn't seem to need to sleep or eat like us mere mortals.  I will always be impressed with their operating abilities. They could run 300 QSOs per hour and could operate for 18 or more hours per day.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 03:41:32 PM by N6PSE » Logged
NU1O
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2013, 03:57:29 PM »

Yes, without a doubt serious and focused contesters make the best DXpedition operators.

That said, I am not a contester and consider myself far from the best. The contesters have better ears, concentration and stamina.  The Russian Ops at 7O6T were absolute "Iron Men" and didn't seem to need to sleep or eat like us mere mortals.  I will always be impressed with their operating abilities. They could run 300 QSOs per hour and could operate for 18 or more hours per day.

The Russians have always impressed me a lot. From the days during the Soviet Union when they had to scrounge up parts to build their own rigs, to the professional way they operate on the air, they are a great group of hams.  I'm glad they're allowed to travel now because they are activating some rare entities.

I just wish I could have more than a 59 QSO with them as I do the Brits or Aussies, but that maybe due to the language barrier.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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W1VT
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2013, 05:00:22 PM »

Yes, the big contests are "iron man" affairs--the top competitors learn how to get by on minimal sleep.  Nor can you let minor issues like bad conditions and equipment issues bother you--you make adjustments/repairs and press on.

A major factor in quickly getting my 80M DXCC was my previous contest experience--being able to balance operating at odd hours with getting enough sleep.

Zack Lau W1VT



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AD9DX
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Posts: 1519




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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2013, 05:07:57 PM »

Yes, without a doubt serious and focused contesters make the best DXpedition operators.

That said, I am not a contester and consider myself far from the best. The contesters have better ears, concentration and stamina.  The Russian Ops at 7O6T were absolute "Iron Men" and didn't seem to need to sleep or eat like us mere mortals.  I will always be impressed with their operating abilities. They could run 300 QSOs per hour and could operate for 18 or more hours per day.

Wow! I guess living through some pretty tough circumstances in their not so distant past toughened those guys up a bit.
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EX, KC9TRM, KB9IRZ
N2RJ
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Posts: 1236




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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2013, 05:58:23 PM »

Yes, absolutely.

Contesters have excellent pileup skills.
Contesters know how to listen for weak ones.
Contesters know how to deal with QRM.
Contesters have stamina and endurance to stay up all night working the pileups.
Contesters know inherently that every single contact counts.

Among a few things.
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AH6RR
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Posts: 803




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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2013, 06:06:45 PM »

Yes, absolutely.

Contesters have excellent pileup skills.
Contesters know how to listen for weak ones.
Contesters know how to deal with QRM.
Contesters have stamina and endurance to stay up all night working the pileups.
Contesters know inherently that every single contact counts.

Among a few things.


Not to mention being able to pull a call out of the pile. I had the chance of using a world class station for a contest and after a few calls you get spotted the the WALL OF SOUND of hundreds or maybe thousands of callers is a eye opener.
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KB3LIX
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Posts: 1128




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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2013, 11:29:53 AM »

Yes, absolutely.

Contesters have excellent pileup skills.
Contesters know how to listen for weak ones.
Contesters know how to deal with QRM.
Contesters have stamina and endurance to stay up all night working the pileups.
Contesters know inherently that every single contact counts.

Among a few things.


What Ryan said.

If I were ever in a situation where I needed HELP, and the only communications available was Amateur Radio, you can BET YOUR BIPPY I wouldwant an experienced contester on the other end for all the above reasons.

I sure as hell don't want some net-a-holic that needs 10kc of clear
bandwidth either side of them to hear anything.

I wish I could gain the skills that the big ops have,
but will probably never get there.
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VK3HJ
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Posts: 697




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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2013, 12:52:40 AM »

I wish I could gain the skills that the big ops have,
but will probably never get there.

There's contests on just about EVERY WEEKEND in which to practice!
I must say I really appreciate having a super operator at the other end, and would have to agree that experienced contesters would have to be amongst the most efficient operators.
Whilst I'm not into contesting, I do operate every day. Keeping the operating skills sharp is essential for an event such as operating in a DXpedition or Contest.
It is a real buzz working a well-organised pile, and seeing how far you can push up the rate meter and hold it there! It certainly helps to be able to touch-type, or at least find the korrect keys to enter the Kallsigns as quickly as you hear them!
73 and continually improve your skills,
Luke VK3HJ
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N2RJ
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Posts: 1236




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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2013, 01:03:27 PM »

I wish I could gain the skills that the big ops have,
but will probably never get there.

I wanted to go to CTU but never got a round tuit. I haven't been to Dayton since 2009? or so.

But last year they did something really nice - they streamed portions of CTU. I realize it's not the same experience and if you want to get the most you should really pay and go, but it was nice learning a few things from the experts.

I hope they do it again this year.
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