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Author Topic: Bird 43 watt meter question  (Read 1856 times)
W1JKA
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Posts: 1766




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« on: April 14, 2013, 04:40:45 AM »

 I was recently given a 43 and can't find what the two yellow plug in slugs are for.I see pictures of them on each side of meter on the internet but no explanation.Please enlighten me,thanks.
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KA4POL
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Posts: 2028




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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2013, 04:54:48 AM »

You are using the one plug that sits in the front. The sides are just holders for spares.
On the plug you can see what power and frequency they are good for. The arrow tells you the direction in which you are measuring, i.e. forward or return.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1766




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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2013, 05:05:13 AM »

Re:KA4POL
  Thanks for reply,yes I understand the regular freq.slug in front and the side spare holes,just do not know what the two extra yellow plastic covered knob like plug/slugs are for.
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AD4U
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2013, 06:05:20 AM »

Normally there are not any yellow plastic knob-like slugs or knobs provided with or on a Bird 43.  Can you post a picture?

Dick  AD4U
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1766




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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2013, 06:24:44 AM »

Re:AD4U
     Poor explanation on my part.I should add that these plugs(no markings) have a square metal base with a screw hole in each corner and appear to be used in lieu of the side coax connectors,the bottom of the base has a small round hole cut out with small pin slightly protruding.I can't post pictures right now but I've seen these on the 43 sides on the various Bird related websites.Thanks
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AG2AA
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2013, 08:59:22 AM »

sounds like interchangeable SO-239 vs N connectors for in/out
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KA4POL
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Posts: 2028




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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2013, 08:59:55 AM »

Is your meter different to this: http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/meters/1739.html
Give us a link.
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KA4POL
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Posts: 2028




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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2013, 09:42:14 AM »

You can see the manual at: http://www.dxstore.com/download/Bird_43_Series_Manual.pdf
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1766




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« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2013, 02:46:53 PM »

   Thanks for all your help folks.Mystery solved, KZ2QZF was right,I went back out to the shop and after 10 minutes of prying and cutting found out it was just a full length soft plastic cover that had hardened to the threads and barrel of an N type solderless connector after 20 years of storage.Now I am starting to realize the true meaning of Old Timers disease.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1482




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« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2013, 06:34:12 PM »

Those ends are also known as "QC connectors". By removing the four screws the little adapter will unplug from the measurement section. You can get all sorts of QC ends for the Bird wattmeter. I have N, TNC, DIN, UHF, HN, C, APC-7 and BNC connector ends. It is nice because if you have the right ones you do not need a bunch of cable adapters.

I think there are even a few transceivers and amps that use the QC style connector because it is a standardized adapter.

If you ever tear up a QC connector on a Bird you can get a replacement for $10-$20.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W6EM
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Posts: 812




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« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2013, 08:50:48 PM »

Yes, called "Quick Change," but anything but quick.  Compare, for example, how long it takes to screw on two BNC to N or UHF to N adapters as opposed to removing four screws from each QC and reinstalling the screws through the QCs for the UHF or BNCs.  I have UHFand N QCs, but very seldom use the Ns.

I don't have much N stuff, so I leave the UHF QCs installed and occasionally use a BNC adapter.  Much faster (and cheaper).
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WB6DGN
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« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2013, 10:04:55 PM »

Quote
Yes, called "Quick Change," but anything but quick.

Well, it WAS when that connector was trademarked!  I bought my first model 43 around 1962 and they had been around quite a while before that.  It sure was nice to be able to match the installation without having to use the lossy and poorly matched (and manufactured) adapters; especially when one manufacturer decided that the mini"U" was a better choice than the then standard UHF connector.  Since most of my test cables have always been type N (to match my test equipment) the 43 input connector was an N female and the output connector was either a UHF female or, later, a miniU female.
I guess, by today's standard, they no longer fill the bill for "instant gratification" that today's generation demands, but, at the time, the connectors were innovative and useful.
Tom
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KQ6EA
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« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2013, 11:27:14 AM »

You have to admit, though, that they're still a whole lot quicker to replace than if you had to open the meter and unsolder the center conductor!

73, Jim
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