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Author Topic: Old Ham - New Technology  (Read 3304 times)
N0JI
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Posts: 9




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« Reply #15 on: April 29, 2013, 08:01:13 PM »

I hear ya...
That's what the lock function is for. If all else fails, turn the radio off and back on, putting it in "default" mode.
The best way to remember the functions is to use them! Practice makes perfect!
You're not going to let an inanimate object beat you, are you?   Grin

I own several hammers, and I know how to use them.  I think I have the edge....... Grin



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G3RZP
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Posts: 4567




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« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2013, 01:13:11 AM »

I have a FT250 HT. Yes, you need the flaming manual for most everything you want to do!

The IC2 was easy........

Yet another good reason to stick to my much modified FT102 for HF.
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AC2EU
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Posts: 395


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« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2013, 06:18:10 AM »

I can imagine that similar complaints and conversations took place when the spark gap transmitter operators had to learn how to use those newfangled TRF radios and tube driven finals.  Grin
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AF5CC
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Posts: 863




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« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2013, 07:32:46 AM »

Too bad there is no longer a TS-130 on the market. Was simplicity itself.

No, but MFJ does make the single band QRP rigs, pretty close to that in terms of ease.  Just no digital display.

John AF5CC
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3832




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« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2013, 08:21:44 AM »

2EU:  You're no doubt absolutely correct!  But staying with the spirit of this discussion, you'll have to admit that something has gone horribly wrong when it's necessary to pull up menus or in many cases, sub-menus, to do a simple thing like change power or to view an S-meter.  I do understand that's it's necessary when cramming many functions into a small box.  But, this seems to be the tendency these days.  As far as I'm concerned, it's unfortunate.

If a ham doesn't have the mental dexterity for video games, or seldom changes operating parameters or functions, then ham radio becomes an exercise in frustration when he has to make these changes.

My first encounter with a menu driven transceiver reminded me of a damn monkey pushing buttons to get a banana along with the squealing, dumping up and down and frantic button pushing out of frustration because he keeps getting it wrong!  Not pretty.
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N0JI
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Posts: 9




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« Reply #20 on: April 30, 2013, 08:24:03 AM »

Too bad there is no longer a TS-130 on the market. Was simplicity itself.

I had a TS-120s for a while, and I can't think of any other rig that I have owned that was more enticing to get on the air with.  Many of my rigs have had more features, most have had better receivers.  None have been quicker from the time of hitting the on switch to transmitting.  It was just very friendly to use.

That said, I wonder if we will ever see such a radio again.  The marketing decicion to delete features that can be cheaply included in menus just isn't very likely.  There are definitely a number of hams that would run out to buy a recreated TS-130s with no frills, no menus.  But, I am afraid it is too few to justify the cost.  However, I think that it's likely that manufacturers will greatly improve the usability of their menu driven offerings in coming years.  Some menu driven radios are quite easy to navigate even without a manual, some are difficult even with the manual sitting in front of you.
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AC2EU
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Posts: 395


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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2013, 10:02:43 AM »

2EU:  You're no doubt absolutely correct!  But staying with the spirit of this discussion, you'll have to admit that something has gone horribly wrong when it's necessary to pull up menus or in many cases, sub-menus, to do a simple thing like change power or to view an S-meter.  I do understand that's it's necessary when cramming many functions into a small box.  But, this seems to be the tendency these days.  As far as I'm concerned, it's unfortunate.

If a ham doesn't have the mental dexterity for video games, or seldom changes operating parameters or functions, then ham radio becomes an exercise in frustration when he has to make these changes.

My first encounter with a menu driven transceiver reminded me of a damn monkey pushing buttons to get a banana along with the squealing, dumping up and down and frantic button pushing out of frustration because he keeps getting it wrong!  Not pretty.

With a little bit of perseverance, you did get your "banana", though!  Grin

I use the CAT (computer aided transceiver) interface with my FT450. HRD does a good job of putting some of those commonly used "buried functions" on the screen so they can be changed quickly with a click or drag.
Sometimes the answer to technology problems is more technology...
If you set up the dx cluster, click the dx station you want and it will even tune the radio to the frequency, etc. All ya gotta do is work the guy. Now that's a bit TOO EASY!
The log automatically pulls data from the radio, knows the time, and dumps in the QRZ station data. Life as a modern Ham is good!

I can operate the radio with or without the interface, but CAT makes it a lot easier. It's a matter of getting used to the "new concepts". There are just so many buttons they can fit on those tiny new rigs!


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N0IU
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Posts: 1295


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« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2013, 10:56:37 AM »

After a long time on the charger, I got the blue light meaning it was ready to go.  I started reading the manual and realized both belonged in the drawer they came out of.
Oh don't do that! I'll give you $10 for the HT!
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N2EY
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Posts: 3879




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« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2013, 02:36:21 PM »

The reason they make those menu-driven rigs is simple: Hams buy them.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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