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Author Topic: Receiver buying advice please  (Read 28115 times)
N0YXB
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Posts: 322




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« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2013, 10:54:26 AM »

Two SDRs that can do this are the Perseus and the QS1R.  The Perseus can record 1600 kHz of bandwidth and the QS1R can record 2000 kHz of bandwidth, both enough to cover the entire AM broadcast band.  

Yeah, I'm still planning on buying a QS1R, but that may not happen for a few months.  Meanwhile, playing with the budget-friendly PCR-100 sounds like fun.
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SWL2002
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Posts: 346




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« Reply #31 on: May 07, 2013, 10:59:49 AM »

Two SDRs that can do this are the Perseus and the QS1R.  The Perseus can record 1600 kHz of bandwidth and the QS1R can record 2000 kHz of bandwidth, both enough to cover the entire AM broadcast band.  

Yeah, I'm still planning on buying a QS1R, but that may not happen for a few months.  Meanwhile, playing with the budget-friendly PCR-100 sounds like fun.

If you are going to use the PCR-100, make sure you have a serial port on your computer or a good USB to serial convertor that is compatible with the PCR-100.  The PCR-100 software communicates to the black box via rs232.  What I did with my PCR-100 is to tap the IF and bring it out to a BNC connector.  I can them use my SDR tuned to the IF frequency and get almost 1 MHz of bandwidth on the panadapter.  This works nicely to be able to tune VHF and UHF bands.  The PCR-100 is not very good on the HF bands, you will soon grow tired of it.

Also, without adding an IF output to the PCR-100, you will be limited to AM, FMN, and FMW.  No SSB.

-robert
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 11:11:05 AM by SWL2002 » Logged
K0OD
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Posts: 2558




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« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2013, 12:43:30 PM »

Quote
He seems to be into MW DXing.  
Yes, he SEEMS to be into MW DXing... or something.

Quote
AM Broadcast DXers (and MW DXers) want to spot new DX stations, NOT listen to one AM radio station.
Guess TED and I have been doing it all wrong, Mister SWL2002.
 
While I do some MW/LW listening, I certainly wouldn't consider it any kind of hobby. My radio stuff shares my home office. There was challenge and accomplishment in DXing with the newfangled technology in the 1920s using a Quaker Oats carton and chip of mineral. Modern receivers are appliances, like toasters.

When you've WORKED Asian stations on 1800 KHz thru monstrous CW pileups, HEARING a professional broadcaster a few states away on 1600 KHz amounts to zip. About as challenging as watching TV... or making toast.

See ya!
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 12:48:09 PM by K0OD » Logged
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2013, 12:54:00 PM »

Quote
He seems to be into MW DXing.  
Yes, he SEEMS to be into MW DXing... or something.

Quote
AM Broadcast DXers (and MW DXers) want to spot new DX stations, NOT listen to one AM radio station.
Guess TED and I have been doing it all wrong, Mister SWL2002.
 
While I do some MW/LW listening, I certainly wouldn't consider it any kind of hobby. My radio stuff shares my home office. There was challenge and accomplishment in DXing with the newfangled technology in the 1920s using a Quaker Oats carton and chip of mineral. Modern receivers are appliances, like toasters.

And when you've WORKED Asian stations on 1800 KHz thru monstrous CW pileups, HEARING a professional broadcaster a few states away on 1600 KHz amounts to zip. About as challenging as watching TV... or making toast.

See ya!


In case you haven't noticed this is the SWL forum which includes MW and LW DXing.  If it is so boring to you, then why are you here (other than to give bad advice)? There are probably just as many or more SWLs than there is Ham radio operators and I am sure some SWLers think of your silly Ham hobby "busting" CW pileups as just as pointless.  Giving guys bad Ham advice when asking about a SWL receiver is not helping anyone.

BTW, I can call anyone I would care to talk to in Asia for free on the phone, or on Skype with a lot less trouble.  Welcome to 2013. Working them on CW with a bunch of impersonal beeps is just about as exciting and pointless as watching the flowers grow in a cemetery. YAWN...
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 01:00:15 PM by SWL2002 » Logged
K5TED
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Posts: 747




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« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2013, 01:15:16 PM »

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Really? "Most" of them? You sure about that? Do "Most" motorcyclists ride Harley's? You might want to consult this site.. http://www.fallacydetective.com/news/read/sweeping-generalization 

 
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SWL2002
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #35 on: May 07, 2013, 03:12:25 PM »

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Really? "Most" of them? You sure about that? Do "Most" motorcyclists ride Harley's? You might want to consult this site.. http://www.fallacydetective.com/news/read/sweeping-generalization  

 

You must not know much about MW DXers then.  The ones that use SDR have all embraced recording the entire spectrum as I have described it.  You would do well to educate yourself by using Google a bit before making yourself look uninformed on a public forum.
 
A good resource: http://www.kongsfjord.no/ and http://arcticdx.blogspot.com/

-robert
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K5TED
Member

Posts: 747




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« Reply #36 on: May 07, 2013, 03:35:26 PM »

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Really? "Most" of them? You sure about that? Do "Most" motorcyclists ride Harley's? You might want to consult this site.. http://www.fallacydetective.com/news/read/sweeping-generalization  

 

You must not know much about MW DXers then.  The ones that use SDR have all embraced recording the entire spectrum as I have described it.  You would do well to educate yourself by using Google a bit before making yourself look uninformed on a public forum.
 
A good resource: http://www.kongsfjord.no/ and http://arcticdx.blogspot.com/

-robert

You didn't specify "the ones that use SDR". You plainly stated, "Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs". That is a broad generalization that holds no water. Much like everything else you post here. The chance that you would even have a remote possibility of educating me about anything at all to do with radio in general is absolutely 0%.
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SWL2002
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #37 on: May 07, 2013, 05:13:33 PM »

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Really? "Most" of them? You sure about that? Do "Most" motorcyclists ride Harley's? You might want to consult this site.. http://www.fallacydetective.com/news/read/sweeping-generalization  

 

You must not know much about MW DXers then.  The ones that use SDR have all embraced recording the entire spectrum as I have described it.  You would do well to educate yourself by using Google a bit before making yourself look uninformed on a public forum.
 
A good resource: http://www.kongsfjord.no/ and http://arcticdx.blogspot.com/

-robert

You didn't specify "the ones that use SDR". You plainly stated, "Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs". That is a broad generalization that holds no water. Much like everything else you post here. The chance that you would even have a remote possibility of educating me about anything at all to do with radio in general is absolutely 0%.

Yes, it is a zero percent chance when you choose to remain ignorant.  Picking and posting only parts of my sentence in an attempt to change the meaning is just a pitiful desperate attempt on your part to try to save face here.  You cant argue with the facts, so you try to create them out of thin air.  Nice try, no cigar.
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K5TED
Member

Posts: 747




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« Reply #38 on: May 07, 2013, 05:35:45 PM »

Here's your entire sentence:

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Do you stand by your assertion that MOST, "the majority", of AM broadcast DXers, have SDRs ?

It seems you are stating that the majority of individuals who have MW DXing as a hobby, either casual, semi-serious or seriously intense, own SDRs and use them in the manner you specified, i.e., to routinely record the entire MW BCB to later parse the results for DX?

How did you come by these statistics? What is the number of SDRs currently in use by MW BCB DXers? How does that compare to the number of MW BCB DXers who use other types of radios?

Are you implying that "MW BCB DXers" are a group of individuals who use only the type of radio you personally deem appropriate for your particular style of operation? Can one be considered a MW BCB DXer if one chooses to use, for example, a non-SDR for MW BCB DXing?

Is it possible that having read a lot of material on the internet regarding hobby use of SDRs, that you might have inadvertently lost your grip on reality when evaluating and evangelizing the relative penetration of SDRs into the MW BCB DXing equipment share? Surely it is substantial, but, is it "MOST"?

Let's review the material..


most

 [ mōst ]   


1.greatest: indicates the greatest in number, amount, extent, or degree
2.to greatest extent: to the greatest extent, or in the largest number or amount
3.superlative of "much": used as the superlative of "much" to mean "with the greatest frequency or intensity"


Isn't it possible that there is a quite substantial number of MW BCB DXers who do NOT use SDRs? Could it be that some individuals who enjoy MW BCB DXing choose to do so using other techniques than you have outlined as the supposedly de facto standard?


Perhaps it might be entertaining for you to start a topic for "Exclusively SDR MW BCB DXers". You might get some traction there. Here, you are just spinning your tires.


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SWL2002
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #39 on: May 07, 2013, 05:55:20 PM »

Here's your entire sentence:

"Most AM broadcast DXers have SDRs that record the ENTIRE AM broadcast band at once to hard disk, usually on a timed basis on the top of each hour, every hour, so the recordings can be reviewed later to spot new stations."

Do you stand by your assertion that MOST, "the majority", of AM broadcast DXers, have SDRs ?

It seems you are stating that the majority of individuals who have MW DXing as a hobby, either casual, semi-serious or seriously intense, own SDRs and use them in the manner you specified, i.e., to routinely record the entire MW BCB to later parse the results for DX?

How did you come by these statistics? What is the number of SDRs currently in use by MW BCB DXers? How does that compare to the number of MW BCB DXers who use other types of radios?

Are you implying that "MW BCB DXers" are a group of individuals who use only the type of radio you personally deem appropriate for your particular style of operation? Can one be considered a MW BCB DXer if one chooses to use, for example, a non-SDR for MW BCB DXing?

Is it possible that having read a lot of material on the internet regarding hobby use of SDRs, that you might have inadvertently lost your grip on reality when evaluating and evangelizing the relative penetration of SDRs into the MW BCB DXing equipment share? Surely it is substantial, but, is it "MOST"?

Let's review the material..


most

 [ mōst ]  


1.greatest: indicates the greatest in number, amount, extent, or degree
2.to greatest extent: to the greatest extent, or in the largest number or amount
3.superlative of "much": used as the superlative of "much" to mean "with the greatest frequency or intensity"


Isn't it possible that there is a quite substantial number of MW BCB DXers who do NOT use SDRs? Could it be that some individuals who enjoy MW BCB DXing choose to do so using other techniques than you have outlined as the supposedly de facto standard?


Perhaps it might be entertaining for you to start a topic for "Exclusively SDR MW BCB DXers". You might get some traction there. Here, you are just spinning your tires.




My sentence had one misplaced word,  "that", which was because of a typo.  You are obviously so desperate for acceptance and to appear superior that you will take a sentence with a single word accidentally out of order and blow it out of all reasonable proportion.  This tells readers a lot about what type of person you are.  Anyone with a bit of sense would have read my sentence and understood the meaning.  What is wrong with you?   How about if I go back in your posts and pick apart all your grammar, spelling, and other mistakes ?  (I would not waste my time.)
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 05:58:16 PM by SWL2002 » Logged
K5TED
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Posts: 747




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« Reply #40 on: May 07, 2013, 09:01:02 PM »

All of this talk about SDRs for MW BCB DXing piqued my interest even further... So here's the deal.

Look here: http://k5ted.net/mp3/

The recording of Cuba's Radio Progreso 1620AM marked "radioprogreso1620TOH.mp3" was made this evening with two radios.

On the Left channel, the Flex 3000, on the Right channel, the modified PCR-100. Each radio feeding separate instances of HDSDR(one set to output AF to the Left, the other to the Right) to keep things fair. Both on the same wire antenna. HDSDR set to AGC OFF, NB OFF, sample rates both set to 96/48, feeding Audacity for recording.

The one marked "radioprogreso1620TOHLRA.mp3" is the same recording, with the L & R channels synched up as well as possible without too much fiddling. The original recording had about a .1 second offset between tracks for obvious reasons. It's also amped up a bit, uniformly, of course, no normalization.

For this exercise, you will need the ability to listen selectively to Left or Right while playing the file, to hear the differences between the radios.

The other recordings are just random samples using the PCR100/HDSDR combo.





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W1JKA
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Posts: 1771




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« Reply #41 on: May 08, 2013, 03:15:08 AM »

Re:N4WVE

Just curious,has all this controversy and grammerical(sic) errors helped you in your decision of which recevier to buy yet?
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RENTON481
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Posts: 67




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« Reply #42 on: May 09, 2013, 10:30:00 PM »

I just glanced at the ERGO site, they say their software works with Icom R75's and Drake R8's.

I realise that SDR's are gaining in popularity, but if I had a choice between an SDR and a stand alone radio like an Icom R75 or Drake R8, I'd choose the R75 or the R8.  But that's just me.

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K1DA
Member

Posts: 513




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« Reply #43 on: May 17, 2013, 06:24:48 AM »

  Google WA1ION, one of the best sources for MW dxing around. 
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VA1CQ
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Posts: 70


WWW

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« Reply #44 on: May 25, 2013, 07:25:48 AM »

Have you heard about the new CommRadio CR-1?
http://www.commradio.com/
http://www.dxing.com/news.htm
http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/commrxvr/2001.html
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