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Author Topic: Single flexible coax from basement to roof. HF, 2m, 70cm.  (Read 4639 times)
AG6PO
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Posts: 3




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« on: May 04, 2013, 11:25:13 PM »

Hello all,

I have one chance to run a cable, hopefully two, from my basement shop to the roof through an existing conduit. I'm thinking that I'll put in a coax line and a CAT5 cable for an antenna switch on the roof.

I expect to transmit from DC to 440 MHz with no more than 50 watts at 440 and no more than 200 on HF bands.
The coax run should be under 100 feet but the conduit isn't straight so I can't use hardline.

I'm thinking that LMR-400 is probably more than sufficient for my purposes. The other top option is RG-213.

Many thanks ahead for anyone's thoughts.
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 988




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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 12:08:00 AM »

If the conduit isn't straight, then large diameter cable will be difficult but you need the big
cable for the VHF/UHF side. LMR400 Ultraflex ?  how tight are the conduit corners ?
for the antenna switch - I've had good luck with the Ameritron RCS-8V, but am using all five ports -
you might go with the RCS-10V for 8 ports. I used indoor/outdoor Cat3 cable for the control run
with my 8V. But keep in mind that with a switch, you can only use one antenna at a time -
so monitoring a repeater while working HF is going to be tough. You might even thing about diplexers
at each end, if you can weather protect the one at the roof.
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KG4RUL
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Posts: 2737


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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 06:03:27 AM »

How about a pair of these: http://www.diamondantenna.net/mx2000.html

Specifications:
   
Port:    LPF/BPF/HPF
Frequency (MHz): 1.6-60/110-170/300-950
CW W: 400/400/250
PEP W: 800/800/500
Loss dB: .15/.2/.25
Isol dB: 60/60/60
Mix Connector: SO-239
Port connector: PL-259 & 12" 5D cable

They are NOT weather proof so the outside unit would need to be protected.
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N4KD
Member

Posts: 139




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« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2013, 08:52:13 AM »

Before you discount Heliax because of the bends in the conduit, get a data sheet and check the installed, one time bend radius. It might work. You probably don't need to go any bigger than LDAF4 on the installation you describe.

Dave N4KD
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N4KD
Member

Posts: 139




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« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2013, 01:22:16 PM »

I thought I could edit my last... Guess not.
Anyway, LDF4-50A has a one time bend radius of 2 in. and a multiple bend radius of 5 in. It might be tough to pull through some right angles, but if you can use it, it would be great in service. Otherwise, LMR-400 is probably fine. Put a preamp at the antenna for the UHF signals and you should be in good shape. Bending radius for LMR-400 is 1 in. for a single bend and 4 in. for multiple bends.

Good Luck es 73
Dave N4KD
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N9LCD
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Posts: 175




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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2013, 06:51:17 AM »

Electricians use something called "pulling compound" when pulling large or multiple cables through a conduit.  Check it out at an electrical supply house.  Or use generic petroleum jelly (vaseline)!

N9LCD
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6081




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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013, 07:09:52 AM »

Hello all,

I have one chance to run a cable, hopefully two, from my basement shop to the roof through an existing conduit. I'm thinking that I'll put in a coax line and a CAT5 cable for an antenna switch on the roof.

I expect to transmit from DC to 440 MHz with no more than 50 watts at 440 and no more than 200 on HF bands.
The coax run should be under 100 feet but the conduit isn't straight so I can't use hardline.

I'm thinking that LMR-400 is probably more than sufficient for my purposes. The other top option is RG-213.

Many thanks ahead for anyone's thoughts.


I would suggest using RG8x for HF feed and 213 for VHF/UHF feed. Some get pretty anal over line loss but on HF to will never see or here the difference. On VHF/UHF if you are on FM you will not really see much difference and you can make loss up with antenna. Point is this combo is flexible and easy to route and you could if route a second RG8x in bundle for another HF antenna later.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1817




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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2013, 09:34:54 AM »

Given only one chance (not sure why), I'd choose either Andrew LDF4-50A or FSJ4-50B depending on the number of bends you encounter.
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W6UV
Member

Posts: 538




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« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2013, 10:50:29 AM »

Electricians use something called "pulling compound" when pulling large or multiple cables through a conduit.  Check it out at an electrical supply house.  Or use generic petroleum jelly (vaseline)!

Vaseline is probably a bad idea. I would use a water-based compound like the ones sold in Home Depot or Lowes. It's the same thing that electrical supply stores sell (and which the local electricians call "monkey snot").
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6081




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« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2013, 11:19:39 AM »

Electricians use something called "pulling compound" when pulling large or multiple cables through a conduit.  Check it out at an electrical supply house.  Or use generic petroleum jelly (vaseline)!

Vaseline is probably a bad idea. I would use a water-based compound like the ones sold in Home Depot or Lowes. It's the same thing that electrical supply stores sell (and which the local electricians call "monkey snot").

I agree do not use Vaseline here. Talc powder can help too. 
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12899




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« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2013, 12:21:07 PM »

Interesting how many are making suggestions without knowing the size of the conduit, the length of the run, the number of 90 degree turns and whether they are swept 90's normally used by electricians. All that makes a huge difference in the number and size of cables you can pull.
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