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Author Topic: Anybody tried morsefusion.com?  (Read 2260 times)
KB1WSY
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Posts: 804




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« on: May 12, 2013, 03:39:56 AM »

Has anyone tried this one:

http://morsefusion.com/

It purports to teach a "non-writing" method such that you recognize the words without having to write them down. This is done right off the bat, unlike other methods where you don't get to "head copy" until the advanced stage. As far as I can tell, a paid subscription is compulsory.

It's too late for me: I am about three quarters of the way through learning the code using the Koch kethod, successfully, albeit with some job-induced lapses. I'm just curious to know about this new "morsefusion" method. It couldn't be more different from Koch, when you consider that Koch consists entirely of nonsense groups of characters, rather than recognizable words.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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N3QE
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Posts: 2288




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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2013, 06:24:59 AM »

OK, I learned CW like 36 years ago at age 9. Back then it was pretty traditional... copying to paper first, and only after much on-air practice did copying-in-head become likely. I personally don't think anything short of extensive QSO's (be they simulated QSO's or real QSO's) get you to full in-head copy.

Of course today we can copy to keyboard with any morse practice program. This could be another layer of difficutly for someone without typing skills!

That said, copying random character groups is a rather different skill than following a conversational QSO although they share a lot in common. When I got into contesting 4-5 years ago, I discovered RufZXP which was great for recognizing callsigns in-head, which is yet a third skill (callsigns are not completely random - there are patterns, but then again there are exceptions to the patterns too!).
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