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Author Topic: Elecraft.LW,MW BCB SW radio?  (Read 26347 times)
N5RWJ
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Posts: 461




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« on: May 15, 2013, 08:27:09 AM »

Do you think that elecraft should try to build , a Gen. communication Receiver on the KX3 platform?
 Note: If you think it is now, your wrong.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 08:40:17 AM by N5RWJ » Logged
W1JKA
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Posts: 1622




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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2013, 03:55:09 AM »

No,I was under the impression that the KX3 was a transceiver designed mostly for the use on the amateur frequencies but I may be wrong.If you want a GENERAL communications receiver about the size of the KX3 just buy a Sony 7600 series.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2546




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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2013, 07:19:45 AM »

Elecraft has a unique entry point now for coming out with a shortwave receiver.

Sony's 7600 series hasn't been updated in years. It doesn't offer knob tuning. At about $200 the 7600s aren't aiming for the Transoceanic market if that still exists... a huge question. An Elecraft receiver would have to be sold primarily on the basis of sound quality, tech innovation and durability, not shortwave reception which few shoppers care about.

Sony and indeed everything Japaneses, have lost luster in recent years. There's talk of breaking up the company which is a bloated major player in insurance and entertainment. Sony's share price has plunged about 85% over the past 13 years, as it has been overtaken in electronics by the likes of Apple, Samsung and LG. OTOH Elecraft is riding high in its tiny niche.

Bringing out a high end shortwave receiver would be a major expansion for Elecraft which certainly lacks consumer marketing experience. It would be costly. They'd be most concerned about Chinese competition. But that's still a few years off in high end radios.
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W1JKA
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2013, 10:47:24 AM »

Re:K0OD

Your post has merit.I was just going by the topic heading and looking at my 30 yr.old
SONY ICF-7600D BCB/FM/LW/MW/SW synthesized receiver and small size which is still working as new.No knob tuning is no problem,it has a fine tune knob and works very well as a receiver for fun qrp ops with my homebrew 3 watt xtmr.. Yes it is probably time for something new on the market with the latest  and greatest technology.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 10:59:36 AM by W1JKA » Logged
K5TED
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Posts: 710




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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2013, 01:51:45 PM »

great idea. Take the KX3, omit the transmitter and mic jack, drop the price $200 and there you go.

Will Elecraft do this? No.
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 471




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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2013, 03:43:22 PM »

Do you think that elecraft should try to build , a Gen. communication Receiver on the KX3 platform?
 Note: If you think it is now, your wrong.

Would you be willing to pay something like $799 for an HF receiver?  That's probably what it would cost!
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K0OD
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Posts: 2546




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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2013, 06:38:43 PM »

great idea. Take the KX3, omit the transmitter and mic jack, drop the price $200 and there you go.
Will Elecraft do this? No.

What did Transoceanics cost years ago? About $275 in 1964! That's much more than $799 adjusted for inflation.

It wouldn't just be a matter of removing the cost of the KX3 transmitter. It would be a matter of immensely broadening the universe of prospective buyers. The current pool of buyers for Elecraft radios is small, dwindling and old.

Much depends on the horizon of Elecraft management. If they want to leave the company to their kids, they'll have to go beyond ham equipment.
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N5RWJ
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Posts: 461




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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2013, 04:10:31 PM »

I think they should add DRM ,MW radio, it's not here in US yet, but it's coming. www.drm.org
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013, 04:30:23 PM by N5RWJ » Logged
K5TED
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« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2013, 09:13:43 PM »

I think they should add DRM ,MW radio, it's not here in US yet, but it's coming. www.drm.org

We've been crossing our fingers on that since 2006 or so. Still waiting...
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KE7TMA
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« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2013, 09:27:05 PM »

I think they should add DRM ,MW radio, it's not here in US yet, but it's coming. www.drm.org

We've been crossing our fingers on that since 2006 or so. Still waiting...

Once more than a tiny handful of radio broadcasters take DRM seriously, you will see some radios with the ability to decode it.  At this point, there isn't a single DRM-capable radio for sale in the USA.  Go ahead, try to buy one.

DRM is dead, this is a fact.
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N5RWJ
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« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2013, 10:58:34 AM »

DRM, is not dead, its just hasn't come yet. without DRM  we will lose SW radio and most MW BCB . But thats what some want.
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K5TED
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Posts: 710




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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2013, 04:01:49 PM »

DRM is alive. Recent DRM developments include the world’s largest DRM30 deployment now taking place in India. Twenty-seven Nautel NX Series DRM-enabled high-power medium-wave transmitters totaling 4.9 MW of power are being deployed throughout the country as part of All India Radio’s conversion to digital broadcasting. The list of DRM transmitter manufactuers includes the big guys like Harris and Continental as well.

That shortwave DRM is not used in the U.S. is not particularly unusual. The FCC currently prohibits domestic shortwave broadcasting.

DRM+ includes all the broadcasting bands above 30 MHz and below 108 MHz. We were served Ibiquity hybrid digital on MW and VHF, and that's where U.S. terrestrial digital radio broadcast stopped, while in many other countries DAB and DRM are widely available. Developing countries are particularly interested in DRM as a method of supplying multimedia content over very wide areas with no digital infrastructure.

DRM dovetails with SDR hobbycraft. With nothing more than a laptop PC, the Funcube Pro, a wire antenna and some free software, one can easily receive DRM broadcasts from around the world, not to mention the full HF SW spectrum in any mode.

The Norwegian Government has given a grant to promote the development of DRM+. The grant was awarded to 21st Century, and runs a local station, Radio Metro. Radio Metro will broadcast DRM+ tests from April-June 2013 to coincide with the Annual Conference of the Norwegian Local Radio Association.

Brazil has 4000 community radio stations under consideration for DRM+ on the VHF FM band.

The list goes on. The current DRM broadcast schedule: http://www.wwdxc.de/drm.htm
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 471




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« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2013, 01:52:04 AM »

DRM is alive. Recent DRM developments include the world’s largest DRM30 deployment now taking place in India. Twenty-seven Nautel NX Series DRM-enabled high-power medium-wave transmitters totaling 4.9 MW of power are being deployed throughout the country as part of All India Radio’s conversion to digital broadcasting. The list of DRM transmitter manufactuers includes the big guys like Harris and Continental as well.

That shortwave DRM is not used in the U.S. is not particularly unusual. The FCC currently prohibits domestic shortwave broadcasting.

DRM+ includes all the broadcasting bands above 30 MHz and below 108 MHz. We were served Ibiquity hybrid digital on MW and VHF, and that's where U.S. terrestrial digital radio broadcast stopped, while in many other countries DAB and DRM are widely available. Developing countries are particularly interested in DRM as a method of supplying multimedia content over very wide areas with no digital infrastructure.

DRM dovetails with SDR hobbycraft. With nothing more than a laptop PC, the Funcube Pro, a wire antenna and some free software, one can easily receive DRM broadcasts from around the world, not to mention the full HF SW spectrum in any mode.

The Norwegian Government has given a grant to promote the development of DRM+. The grant was awarded to 21st Century, and runs a local station, Radio Metro. Radio Metro will broadcast DRM+ tests from April-June 2013 to coincide with the Annual Conference of the Norwegian Local Radio Association.

Brazil has 4000 community radio stations under consideration for DRM+ on the VHF FM band.

The list goes on. The current DRM broadcast schedule: http://www.wwdxc.de/drm.htm

That's just silly.  The impoverished poor in rural India really need a new mode that takes a radio that costs a year's wages or more to receive.

I bet these transmitters are all welfare cases (subsidized) and the radios will be too.  And the batteries that these people use in remote villages will burn up 10x faster.

DRM is like HD radio, a patent lawyer's wet dream and everybody else either hates it or doesn't care.
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K5TED
Member

Posts: 710




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« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2013, 01:58:03 PM »

DRM is alive. Recent DRM developments include the world’s largest DRM30 deployment now taking place in India. Twenty-seven Nautel NX Series DRM-enabled high-power medium-wave transmitters totaling 4.9 MW of power are being deployed throughout the country as part of All India Radio’s conversion to digital broadcasting. The list of DRM transmitter manufactuers includes the big guys like Harris and Continental as well.

That shortwave DRM is not used in the U.S. is not particularly unusual. The FCC currently prohibits domestic shortwave broadcasting.

DRM+ includes all the broadcasting bands above 30 MHz and below 108 MHz. We were served Ibiquity hybrid digital on MW and VHF, and that's where U.S. terrestrial digital radio broadcast stopped, while in many other countries DAB and DRM are widely available. Developing countries are particularly interested in DRM as a method of supplying multimedia content over very wide areas with no digital infrastructure.

DRM dovetails with SDR hobbycraft. With nothing more than a laptop PC, the Funcube Pro, a wire antenna and some free software, one can easily receive DRM broadcasts from around the world, not to mention the full HF SW spectrum in any mode.

The Norwegian Government has given a grant to promote the development of DRM+. The grant was awarded to 21st Century, and runs a local station, Radio Metro. Radio Metro will broadcast DRM+ tests from April-June 2013 to coincide with the Annual Conference of the Norwegian Local Radio Association.

Brazil has 4000 community radio stations under consideration for DRM+ on the VHF FM band.

The list goes on. The current DRM broadcast schedule: http://www.wwdxc.de/drm.htm

That's just silly.  The impoverished poor in rural India really need a new mode that takes a radio that costs a year's wages or more to receive.

I bet these transmitters are all welfare cases (subsidized) and the radios will be too.  And the batteries that these people use in remote villages will burn up 10x faster.

DRM is like HD radio, a patent lawyer's wet dream and everybody else either hates it or doesn't care.

Actually, DRM is an open standard. Not everybody hates it. Some people do care about it.
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 471




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« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2013, 08:48:46 PM »

Actually, DRM is an open standard. Not everybody hates it. Some people do care about it.

Sure, the engineers who invented it and the lawyers who work for the companies that own the patents.  But what benefit will this bring to the average rural Indian person?  They probably already own an AM SW receiver, what is their incentive to purchase a new, expensive, and battery eating radio?  The noises that come out of the speaker will be the same, but at significantly greater expense and significantly greater power usage.
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