Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ham Radio & High Altitude Balloon  (Read 2044 times)
K5UTC
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« on: October 16, 2003, 12:17:27 AM »

Hello
I am looking for a schematic for a low power HFFM Transmitter to be used as a beacon  on our next balloon flight. If any one has built or knows of a good schematic for this Please let me know.Note size, weight and power cunsumption are crucial.

    Thanks

         Chad K5UTC
         www.soares.us/balloon.htm
Logged
KE6PKJ
Member

Posts: 256




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2003, 04:43:01 PM »

When you say HF FM do you mean 10 meters? Did you really mean vhf 2 meters, or 220 or even 50 mhz? If it's a cw only beacon do you really need fm? Is a crystal oven required for high altitude? More info please as to what you want to do/accomplish.
Logged
K5UTC
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2003, 12:33:18 AM »

Yes I am sorry looking for 10m or any suitable band I will have 2m and 70cm onboard already just looking for an aditional transmitter to assist in ground tracking and maybe a little DX. A crystal oven may be needed to help with the cold but I'm not sure? it will go from what ever ground temp is that day to well below freezing im sure with altitudes @100k possible. I am mostly looking to get suggestions from those with a bit more experience at this or with transmitters that have been proven solid at ground level.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13586




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2003, 03:40:42 PM »

If you want to track it in the air, then VHF will be
much better:  practical antennas will have a much more
directive pattern and therefore give a better bearing
as you go higher in frequency.  (You can build antennas
with a sharp null for DF work on HF, but most people
won't have one handy.  A bearing with a good 3-element
yagi might be good within +/- 15 degrees with a
line-of-sight signal or ground wave, but things get
less predictable when signal is propagated through
the ionosphere.)

For tracking the signal after it hits the ground, then
the lower frequencies will be best - 80 or 160m.  These
bands have the longest ground wave coverage, and that
is what will give you the best bearings.  Of course,
the range will depend on what happens to the trailing
wire antenna when the balloon lands - a dangling wire
from a box in a tree might be heard 10 or 20 miles,
while a pile of wire under the box on the ground may
not get out much further than a few hundred yards.

For reference, I can hear a 1 watt 80m CW transmitter
using a 26' wire antenna and 3 radials out to 7 or 10
miles with my DF receivers.

If you want to try for some DX reports on your beacon,
then 10m or 15m may not be a bad choice.  I'd use a
small CW transmitter, perhaps 50 to 100mW.  The CW
signal can be copied at much weaker signal strengths
than FM could be.

So the choice of transmitter will depend on what you
want to do with the beacon.  Once you choose the band
you want to use, there are quite a number of QRP
transmitter circuits available.  I'd suggest a quick
look through Solid State Design for the Radio Amateur.
I think circuit boards for most of those designs - as
well as many others - are available from FAR circuits.
Logged
FRANKM12
Member

Posts: 46




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2003, 11:46:27 PM »

K5UTC,

I don't know but this may be what you want and at least you can read the values for the components:

http://mysite.verizon.net/jimyhf2/tx500/tx500.htm



Logged
W5WJP
Member

Posts: 157




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2003, 02:20:26 PM »

Best way to track a balloon is with APRS. You will need a 2m radio with a TNC and a GPS. Last balloon our club launched was tracked and recovered via APRS we did not need to DF it. Made recovery much easier. North Texas Ballon Project Launch #11 (or is it #12??) is slated for mid-March 2004.
Logged
N2NXZ
Member

Posts: 121


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2013, 10:49:11 AM »

Hello
I am looking for a schematic for a low power HFFM Transmitter to be used as a beacon  on our next balloon flight. If any one has built or knows of a good schematic for this Please let me know.Note size, weight and power cunsumption are crucial.

    Thanks

         Chad K5UTC
         www.soares.us/balloon.htm

Old Post,but for those looking for something like this can check this out.Works great especially for balloon payloads.Can also be FM modulated.

schematic > http://i430.photobucket.com/albums/qq22/N2NXZ/Osc-1.jpg
Finished > http://i430.photobucket.com/albums/qq22/N2NXZ/DSCF0034.jpg
Complete with CW keyer > http://i430.photobucket.com/albums/qq22/N2NXZ/DSCF0038.jpg

Now to find some 10m crystals? Check your old 56k modems !!!
Jim,N2NXZ
Logged
N2NXZ
Member

Posts: 121


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2013, 10:58:37 AM »

Here is my experience with this transmitter and balloons.
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrvhnzZgEhEPRxzjpzUw3ug
Jim,N2NXZ
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 4004




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2013, 12:00:28 PM »

The last issue of QST had the 3 winning videos made by hams.  The first place winner was a high altitude balloon launch with planning and gear used by school kids.  Suggest you check out this video on the ARRL website and contact the hams that were involved with this launch.

I'm one that believes that once a "wheel is invented," use it instead of designing another one.   Grin

Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!