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Author Topic: HEXBEAM Tilt Mount Base or Push up Pole?  (Read 8850 times)
WH7DX
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Posts: 1029




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« on: May 19, 2013, 01:29:12 PM »

Who sells a solid Tilt Mount Base or are people using push up poles with Hexbeams?

A Tilt Mount Base designed to anchor to another pole would be ideal....

The easiest is probably a push up pole - going about 20ft into the air.  They can ship that UPS now.   Hex beam and rotor are 50lbs..    Is that easy enough to lift (strong person etc.)

My current setup is a mounting pole that swivels next to an anchor pole and then locks down with bolt on the bottom but I'll need to replace that next time I take the antenna down.

I was thinking something like this - BUT it's not heavy duty.

http://www.dxengineering.com/parts/dxe-tb-4p





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A9KW
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Posts: 105


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2013, 08:22:38 PM »

ZEROFIVE-ANTENNAS
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K2MK
Member

Posts: 407




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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2013, 04:13:07 AM »

http://www.penningerradio.com/
http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4373
http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/6042
http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/5235

73,
Mike K2MK
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WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2013, 11:49:09 AM »

Thank you guys.   One of those should work.   

TU!
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13580




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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 12:53:35 PM »

I use the 4' military surplus aluminum mast sections, and two people can
easily put up a tribander to 32'.  (I was going to do it by myself to show it
could be done, but another ham insisted on helping me.  Three people is
probably the most convenient number:  two to lift and one to feed sections.)

I put the antenna on top of two sections of mast, attach the guy ropes
(approximate lengths), and walk towards one of the guy anchors until the
other two guys are tight.  At that point I should be able to set the mast
on the ground and lean it against the two guys while I pick up the next
mast section.  Pick up the mast and antenna (moving slightly towards the
guy anchors, but while keeping it leaning slightly against the guy ropes),
slip in the next section of mast, and lower it back down.  Lather, rinse, repeat.

Though with a big antenna on top I'd generally put up just the mast and
get it positioned where I want it, tie off the guy ropes, then lower it back
down and put the antenna on.

The 4' mast sections are about as long as I can manage:  5' TV mast
sections would be too tall (though they could be cut down.)  There are
some 3' or 32" sectional masts available which would be better, or you can
make your own.

Because the mast is always vertical it doesn't have the bending moment, and
the weight involved is less than trying to tip up the same antenna load.
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WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2013, 03:44:11 PM »

I use the 4' military surplus aluminum mast sections, and two people can
easily put up a tribander to 32'.  (I was going to do it by myself to show it
could be done, but another ham insisted on helping me.  Three people is
probably the most convenient number:  two to lift and one to feed sections.)

I put the antenna on top of two sections of mast, attach the guy ropes
(approximate lengths), and walk towards one of the guy anchors until the
other two guys are tight.  At that point I should be able to set the mast
on the ground and lean it against the two guys while I pick up the next
mast section.  Pick up the mast and antenna (moving slightly towards the
guy anchors, but while keeping it leaning slightly against the guy ropes),
slip in the next section of mast, and lower it back down.  Lather, rinse, repeat.

Though with a big antenna on top I'd generally put up just the mast and
get it positioned where I want it, tie off the guy ropes, then lower it back
down and put the antenna on.

The 4' mast sections are about as long as I can manage:  5' TV mast
sections would be too tall (though they could be cut down.)  There are
some 3' or 32" sectional masts available which would be better, or you can
make your own.

Because the mast is always vertical it doesn't have the bending moment, and
the weight involved is less than trying to tip up the same antenna load.

I think I understand what you're doing.   That's sounds pretty clever.   I guess the main focus is making sure the bottom doesn't slide out towards you as the mast is extended up (leaning back).   Having something up 32' with 4' sections sounds like a lot of joints - but I guess being put up fairly close to vertical takes some of the stress off.
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NN4ZZ
Member

Posts: 44




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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2013, 03:52:33 AM »

Here is a product to make it safe and easy to maintain your hexbeam.                

The HexLock  is a device that will let you tilt your tower all the way to the ground to work on your HexBeam type antenna, rotator, or tower.   It works by letting the Hexbeam  swivel up and out of the way as the tower is lowered.   When the tower is in the operational position the antenna is locked into position.  The locking mechanism is powered by gravity.

No more climbing to work on any part of your antenna, tower or rotator.

More information and pictures at:

http://www.nn4zz.com/HexLock.html

Regards, Al / NN4ZZ


 
« Last Edit: May 21, 2013, 03:57:40 AM by NN4ZZ » Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13580




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« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2013, 07:34:55 AM »

The mast sections are about 1 7/8" diameter aluminum with 3/16" thick walls
(as near as I could tell in a dim corner of the garage.)  They're actually pretty
strong and relatively light, especially compared to steel.  But by keeping the
forces mostly vertical as I put them up there really isn't much sideways
pressure on the joints.

I have some similar fiberglass sections that I've stacked to 40' all by myself,
though they need multiple guy ropes at that height because the joints aren't
nearly as strong:  I've had some break out from the force of the wind sideways
on a 24' mast.

Similar sections could be made from other local materials.  One limitation is the
weight:  you have to be able to lift the mast sections + antenna and rotator
enough to slip in the next section.  For longer sections a step ladder may come
in handy, but keeping the sections relatively short makes it easier.
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WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2013, 10:01:04 AM »

So do I have that installation correct... the mast and antenna are leaning back a little against the two back guy ropes and the bottom pole just needs to remain secure to the ground and not slip forward?

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N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9927




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« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2013, 12:01:46 PM »

Get a 20/30/40 foot push up mast.  pound a pipe into the ground about 2 or 2 1/2 fee that is large enough to let the bottom of the push up mast fit inside. Put the push up mast in the  pipe and put the antenna on the top section. ( it will only be up about 8 feet with the bottom of the mast in the other pipe). attach  some slightly "too long" guys to the top section and raise the mast up the top 10 feet.  now put some guys at the top of the next section, pin the first piece, and then run the second piece up, do this again till it is all the way up. then attach all of the guys to their  anchor points, and you are done. you Can now run this antenna up and down any time you  need to.  The first section in the pipe steadies the base, and the guys hold it when raises.  do not raise or lower when the wind is blowing.
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WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




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« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2013, 12:08:58 PM »

What have you used for the antenna?    A hex beam with rotor is about 50 pounds.   I think that's doable.. just wear gloves and watch out for fingers.
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WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2013, 01:11:39 PM »

Here is a product to make it safe and easy to maintain your hexbeam.                

The HexLock  is a device that will let you tilt your tower all the way to the ground to work on your HexBeam type antenna, rotator, or tower.   It works by letting the Hexbeam  swivel up and out of the way as the tower is lowered.   When the tower is in the operational position the antenna is locked into position.  The locking mechanism is powered by gravity.

No more climbing to work on any part of your antenna, tower or rotator.

More information and pictures at:

http://www.nn4zz.com/HexLock.html

Regards, Al / NN4ZZ


 

That's an interesting product and useful for most Hexbeam owners.    I have a flat roof with a concrete walkway leading up to the side so I can move the hexbeam and mast to whatever height I need to work on it.   I then take off the hexbeam and put it in a 5 gallon bucket with concrete and a pipe to hold it up.
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KH6DC
Member

Posts: 666




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« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2013, 11:29:47 AM »

Hey Bryan,

Just wondering what mast and tilt system you ended up going with?

73, Delwyn KH6DC
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
WH7DX
Member

Posts: 1029




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« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2013, 03:47:11 PM »

Hey Bryan,

Just wondering what mast and tilt system you ended up going with?

73, Delwyn KH6DC

Delwyn nice QSO with Jordan the other day..  Grin

You guys both had a clear and loud signal to each other..  me.. not so much... Cry    Grin

I tried right after you but I was only copying him about 52 and no match for the big pile up on frequency.

I ended up keeping the general setup and redoing all the wires and center post of the Hex Beam..   Put new clamps on the rotor, painted everything black and replaced the antenna mast pole - making it another 10' taller (used two 8ft galvanized fence post *tubes* with another pipe inside as the joint support - sliding everything into another short tilting pipe attached to a mount.  

The new Hexbeam wire looks like 6 gauge stranded wire with a clear coat.  Very nice.    I originally ordered a new 17 and 20M wire but when it came in and I saw what an improvement it was and how it wasn't going to match, I ordered the 10, 12 and 15.   Now it looks like a giant black upside down umbrella with shinny gold lines wrapped around it in the sun..   Grin    so much for steath!!!     Shocked

The next time I take it down - I'm going to redo the whole mounting system.   Go with a *real* tilt mount or pushup pole.    They have a 30ft pushup pole that can ship UPS that isn't that bad $$$ etc..



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KH6DC
Member

Posts: 666




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« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2013, 11:50:43 PM »

Bryan,  I worked Jordan using a NA4RR hex temporarily mounted on 3 sections of an unused Hustler 6 BTV vertical mounted on a Rockwell Jawhorse.  It was about 10 ft high and rotating was via the armstrong method.  Took everything down since I needed to use the Jawhorse.  I believe the push up mast is a Rohn 9H50?  I also plan to get that and a Yaesu GS450 rotator within the next several months.  Living in Mililani Mauka you gotta be stealth.  I'm almost done painting the hex black, I only have the center post left to paint.  The next big thing to paint is the push up mast.  I have to mount the antenna in my backyard so the MTA inspectors can't see it from the road.  Hope my neighbor behind me doesn't mind staring at a black upside down umbrella out their bedroom window  Grin
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
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