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Author Topic: Lafayette-Kenwood??  (Read 13512 times)
K3ZL
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Posts: 131




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« on: July 11, 2013, 08:09:50 AM »

There is a nice Lafayette KT200 on eBay that I am watching.  The description says that it was manufactured by Trio-Kenwood for Lafayette.  Surprise to me.  Anyone ever heard of that arrangement?
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KG6YV
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2013, 09:01:09 AM »

Yes, I woned one of these.  It was a "Trio Electronics" product.  Trio eventually changed their name to Kenwood.  This is a nice radio.  Although it looks kinda like a Hallicrafters S-38 the Kenwood is a much better radio.  It has a power transformer unlike the Hallicrafters, it uses 7 tubes I believe, has an IF filter and an S-meter.  Very sensitive, nice and stable (I believe it has a regulator tube) and works well. 

FYI, Trio also OEM'd radios to ALlied Radio.  The A-2015 tube receiver in the late 60's and a transceiver that was a Heathkit SB101 clone. 

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KB4QAA
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2013, 09:03:35 AM »

http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/trio_kenwo_9r_4j.html

Radio Museum says it is so.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2013, 10:35:19 AM »

Post WWII Japan never fell into the American practice of each manufacturer being an entity entirely on its own.  Their viewpoint was still one of "Japan vs the rest of the world" if you will, and that meant that their various manufacturers were much more inclined to cross brand lines as witnessed here.  Even more took place behind the scenes, the sharing of various developments, even component level products. 

Yeah, we had to do case studies of Japanese manufacturing back in my university research engineering days.  Some even got to visit plants in Japan to gather data. 


73
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K3ZL
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2013, 12:54:00 PM »

Yes, I woned one of these.  It was a "Trio Electronics" product.  Trio eventually changed their name to Kenwood.  This is a nice radio.  Although it looks kinda like a Hallicrafters S-38 the Kenwood is a much better radio.  It has a power transformer unlike the Hallicrafters, it uses 7 tubes I believe, has an IF filter and an S-meter.  Very sensitive, nice and stable (I believe it has a regulator tube) and works well. 

FYI, Trio also OEM'd radios to ALlied Radio.  The A-2015 tube receiver in the late 60's and a transceiver that was a Heathkit SB101 clone. 


That's got to be true.  I have a couple of S-38's that work as good as possible and basically seem like junk to me.  AC/DC radios.  In fact, I have owned a bunch of later Hallicrafters radios (with power transformers).  Don't really get why they are so popular.  Maybe for collectors but not for ham or swl use in my little opinion.
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K3ZL
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Posts: 131




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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2013, 12:57:09 PM »

Post WWII Japan never fell into the American practice of each manufacturer being an entity entirely on its own.  Their viewpoint was still one of "Japan vs the rest of the world" if you will, and that meant that their various manufacturers were much more inclined to cross brand lines as witnessed here.  Even more took place behind the scenes, the sharing of various developments, even component level products. 

Yeah, we had to do case studies of Japanese manufacturing back in my university research engineering days.  Some even got to visit plants in Japan to gather data. 


73
Yeah, I know a guy who also did that.  He visited one of the motorcycle factories that had produced airplanes during the 1940s.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2013, 03:14:29 PM »

The Lafayette HE-30 is also a Trio / Kenwood receiver of 1962-ish vintage. The pics I've seen of them looked like a quality design with a build level to match.

Ask N4NYY about that... He had a nice one until he tried cleaning the back side of the dial glass with a Brillo pad soaked in Xylol.

Seemed like a good idea at the time.   Roll Eyes
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WA9FZB
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« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2013, 12:53:53 PM »

I have no experience with Trio-Kenwood/Lafayette communications gear, but I did have a Lafayette Quadraphonic Stereo receiver (don't laugh, it still works well), bought new in 1975.  When it toasted an output transistor, I opened it up to install a replacement.  I was quite pleased to find a Trio-Kenwood receiver under the Lafayette cabinet.  Very well made.

Also, in the late 1970's I was "involved" with Cobra Electronics - the maker of many CB radios of the time.  Their products were all produced by Trio-Kenwood, and shipped to the "factory" in Chicago by the container load.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2013, 01:34:28 PM »

There are also quite a few examples of these "brand-hybrids" from Japan to be found in the stereo/hifi market.  Pioneer either manufactured or at least designed stereo gear for quite the assortment of brands marketed here.  Dr Nakamichi licensed quite a few of his tape deck designs to companies such as Pioneer.  The early days of electronics import houses here in the states, 60's outfits such as Olson's, Lafayette, and even Tandy and his original Radio Shack ventures, who may have been the first to do so, or darn near, marketed various electronic products that were actually made by Japanese firms that were both known here and some whom most Americans would never recognize simply because the stuff was never sold here under those original Japanese names. 

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WA2CWA
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2013, 07:42:28 PM »

I have no experience with Trio-Kenwood/Lafayette communications gear, but I did have a Lafayette Quadraphonic Stereo receiver (don't laugh, it still works well), bought new in 1975.  When it toasted an output transistor, I opened it up to install a replacement.  I was quite pleased to find a Trio-Kenwood receiver under the Lafayette cabinet.  Very well made.

Also, in the late 1970's I was "involved" with Cobra Electronics - the maker of many CB radios of the time.  Their products were all produced by Trio-Kenwood, and shipped to the "factory" in Chicago by the container load.

There were several manufacturers of Lafayette stereo (Hi-Fi) equipment over the years. Many of the short wave/amateur receivers were made by Trio from the late 50's through the 60's. They even made a few transceivers. There were several OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturer) that made equipment for Lafayette and a number of other well known retail brands. Having worked for Lafayette in from roughly 62 through 84, I've seen and touched a lot of their equipment. In the mid 70's I also took on some of their service work. I still have quite a few OEM parts.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 1000




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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2013, 09:43:04 PM »

The same receiver was sold in Europe with the Trio badge; USA versions were sold under the Lafayette banner.

http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/trio_kenwo_9r_4j.html

Note the difference in the S Meter mounting.

Pete
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K3ZL
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Posts: 131




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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2013, 11:05:02 AM »


There were several manufacturers of Lafayette stereo (Hi-Fi) equipment over the years. Many of the short wave/amateur receivers were made by Trio from the late 50's through the 60's. They even made a few transceivers. There were several OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturer) that made equipment for Lafayette and a number of other well known retail brands. Having worked for Lafayette in from roughly 62 through 84, I've seen and touched a lot of their equipment. In the mid 70's I also took on some of their service work. I still have quite a few OEM parts.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com

[/quote]
I have a early 1960s HE-40.  Who made that one?  I am quite sure than it was no Kenwood Trio.  It has All American tube set, and is cheaply made, like some of the later Hallicrafters models that were made in Japan.  Did Lafayette ever make their own branded equipment such as those noted above?
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ZS5WC
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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2013, 04:13:11 AM »

Lafayette and Trio were bedfellows, I have the MATCHED set TRIO TX-88a AM transmitter--and the Lafayette HE-30 reciever.
Cases , knobs are also identical.
I suspect BOTH were marketed as Kits.
The TX-88a includes 6m strangely enough, and the Lafayette HE-30 RX is blisteringly HOT!.

73 de William
ZS4L
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WA2CWA
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Posts: 298


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« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2013, 02:44:46 PM »

Quote

There were several manufacturers of Lafayette stereo (Hi-Fi) equipment over the years. Many of the short wave/amateur receivers were made by Trio from the late 50's through the 60's. They even made a few transceivers. There were several OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturer) that made equipment for Lafayette and a number of other well known retail brands. Having worked for Lafayette in from roughly 62 through 84, I've seen and touched a lot of their equipment. In the mid 70's I also took on some of their service work. I still have quite a few OEM parts.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com

I have a early 1960s HE-40.  Who made that one?  I am quite sure than it was no Kenwood Trio.  It has All American tube set, and is cheaply made, like some of the later Hallicrafters models that were made in Japan.  Did Lafayette ever make their own branded equipment such as those noted above?

I pretty sure the HE-40 was also made by Trio. Kit version was the KT-222. It was also sold in Europe under a different name a model number. Lafayette made a number of amateur transmitters back  in the late 30's at their 100 6th Ave NYC building. A number of their tube kit/wired Hi-Fi line in the 50's were designed by Lafayette Engineers. The kits were kitted by a U.S. manufacturer and wired versions reportedly were assembled and tested by Lafayette.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com
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WA2CWA
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Posts: 298


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« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2013, 02:59:31 PM »

Lafayette and Trio were bedfellows, I have the MATCHED set TRIO TX-88a AM transmitter--and the Lafayette HE-30 reciever.
Cases , knobs are also identical.
I suspect BOTH were marketed as Kits.
The TX-88a includes 6m strangely enough, and the Lafayette HE-30 RX is blisteringly HOT!.

73 de William
ZS4L

Lafayette was in bed with a number of original equipment manufacturers over the years. Some were very obscure and some were notable. The Trio TX-88A was never marketed in the U.S. The HE-30 kit was called the KT-320. It was good for what it was designed for but I never considered that it had stellar performance. At the tail end of the Lafayette and Trio relationship, Trio designed a 6 and 2 meter receiver for Lafayette called the HA-73. It was mounted in the same cabinet that was used for the HA-63 receiver. It's interesting that the model number HA-73 was also used for a Lafayette 100 mw 2-channel walkie-talkie. The walkie-talkie survived for a number of years; the receiver never made it past one prototype sample. The prototype sample now resides with VA amateur radio collector.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com


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