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Author Topic: Lafayette-Kenwood??  (Read 14265 times)
K3ZL
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Posts: 135




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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2013, 07:02:41 AM »

Good stuff Pete. I was not aware of  their arrangements. Also didn't know about the K T122. 
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K4SC
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2013, 06:08:16 AM »

I worded for an associate store in Phoenix in the mid-sixties.  I remember all stock numbers beginning with the number 99- were Japanese origin.  I lusted after the HA-350 ham band only receiver, which was also a Trio product.
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4818




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« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2013, 07:08:27 AM »

The Lafayette HE-30 is also a Trio / Kenwood receiver of 1962-ish vintage. The pics I've seen of them looked like a quality design with a build level to match.

Ask N4NYY about that... He had a nice one until he tried cleaning the back side of the dial glass with a Brillo pad soaked in Xylol.

Seemed like a good idea at the time.   Roll Eyes


LOL. Well, not quite. A simple rinsing with soap and water caused the letters to start falling off. Upon further research, this was a notorious problem with that model, and the letters would fall off over time without any cleaning.
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WN2C
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Posts: 479




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« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2013, 08:21:52 AM »

Hey Vinnie, look here: http://www.ohio.edu/people/postr/bapix/kt200.htm

Rick  WN2C
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4818




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« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2013, 08:32:33 AM »

Hey Vinnie, look here: http://www.ohio.edu/people/postr/bapix/kt200.htm

Rick  WN2C

Very nice. Looks like a S-38 knockoff, but clearly is a better receiver. And the BFO makes it useful today for listening to SSB..
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4844




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« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2013, 02:49:43 PM »

For quite a few years, the name 'Trio' was used in Europe and I believe much of Africa because the name 'Kenwood' was a registered trade mark name used for domestic appliances (coffee makers, toasters etc.), and I believe, belonged to the UK General Electric Company or one of its subsidiaries.

Who is this guy 'Ken Wood' anyway? Anything like 'Kilroy'?
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WA2CWA
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Posts: 308


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« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2013, 08:11:14 PM »

The Lafayette HE-30 is also a Trio / Kenwood receiver of 1962-ish vintage. The pics I've seen of them looked like a quality design with a build level to match.

Ask N4NYY about that... He had a nice one until he tried cleaning the back side of the dial glass with a Brillo pad soaked in Xylol.

Seemed like a good idea at the time.   Roll Eyes


LOL. Well, not quite. A simple rinsing with soap and water caused the letters to start falling off. Upon further research, this was a notorious problem with that model, and the letters would fall off over time without any cleaning.

Actually, the problem was not isolated only to that receiver. The problem cropped up on a number of receivers and also on several Lafayette Hi-Fi tuner and receiver dial glasses. The print emulsion on the dial glass would start to dry out and flake off and if you applied liquid to wipe off that side of the glass you ran the risk of smearing the print or wiping it off. I believe the print was baked on, so if the baking cycle was off or if the emulsion consistency was off, it led to problems further down the road.

Pete, wa2cwa
http://www.manualman.com
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 405




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« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2013, 01:45:46 PM »

I bought a "Fisher" mini-stereo in 1991. Years later, when the CD unit developed problems, I opened it and found the name "Sanyo" stamped on the PCB. So this practice didn't end in the 70s. The "Sanyo" name apparently didn't have as much name recognition in the US as Fisher. I know that Sanyo was a common name in non-UK Europe. In the Mideast the name became "Sunny"  Huh possibly because "Sanyo" resembled an unpleasant word in Arabic.
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AC5UP
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Posts: 3927




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« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2013, 02:09:51 PM »

Fisher stopped being "Fisher" in the early 70's when it morphed into an importer whose engineering niche involved designing face plates to fit Asian goods.......... By 1991 I think Fisher had nothing to do with "Fisher" beyond licensing the use of the name.

Yesterday I was surfing for TV's and found the RCA brand name is being recycled again. Has nothing to do with Camden, NJ or Indianapolis, IN but aside from that the logo is red and recognizable
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 405




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« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2013, 02:22:05 PM »

For quite a few years, the name 'Trio' was used in Europe and I believe much of Africa because the name 'Kenwood' was a registered trade mark name used for domestic appliances (coffee makers, toasters etc.), and I believe, belonged to the UK General Electric Company or one of its subsidiaries.

Who is this guy 'Ken Wood' anyway? Anything like 'Kilroy'?

Kenneth Wood. He was an Englishman who invented the first food processor. Not a blender or a cake mixer, but a real honest to god food processor, like a Cuisinart. The first product was the "Robot Kenwood Chef", in 1946. So no, it wasn't like Betty Crocker and Joan Oster, where the name was a marketing gimmick. Kenneth Wood was a real living person.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2013, 05:16:12 PM »

...not to mention Thomas Crapper

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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 405




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« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2013, 05:50:08 PM »

Wikipedia article on Mr. Wood:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Wood_(manufacturer)

It appears that his products were mainly sold in Europe, and possibly in British colonies in Africa. I also know that when Panasonic first came to America, their products were named "National". Oops-there was already a National electronics maker in the US. Then they had to pick another name, and came up with Panasonic. Japanese companies frequently used American-sounding names in the early days of export, because the real names were considered a liability due to difficulty of pronunciation and anti-Japanese sentiment left over from the war. Panasonic's real name is Matsushita. It's pronounced "mot-shoosh-tuh", but they seemed to know that Americans wouldn't say that. The original Trio was using Kenwood for reasons that I don't know, and then had to use the name Trio in the UK.
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