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Author Topic: Station Battery BU  (Read 4523 times)
N6JSX
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Posts: 216




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« on: June 17, 2014, 03:16:38 PM »

For many years I've desired to put a 12VDC battery on my Station 12VDC buss. I've looked at a few different methods and found most to be costly or energy wasting limiting its life cycle.

I was considering creating:
    diode switching (but a diode will drop ~1VDC from the battery - energy wasting
    DPDT relays 120VAC but I fear drop outs and the life of the coils (one + other -)

Recently I saw "solar power controllers". Hmmmm, I wonder if I could use a solar controller substituting 12VDC solar cells with an Astron 12VDC? That would keep the battery charged and minimal transfer loss to the 12VDC 'load' buss? I think so providing the solar controller is properly rated, i.e. 30A, eBay has them for ~$22. (my HF rig wants ~25A)
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12688




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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2014, 04:47:49 PM »

This is one way: http://www.westmountainradio.com/product_info.php?products_id=pg40s

Another way is to power the radios directly from the 12V battery and use a small charger to keep the battery charged. When you are transmitting, power will be taken from the battery but the battery will be recharged when the radio is turned off or during receive is the charger is able to supply more than the required radio receive current. No switching will be required.

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K2OWK
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Posts: 1041




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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2014, 05:32:01 PM »

I use an UPS supply on my station. Power goes off, I would not even notice except that the UPS supply starts beeping. Simple and cheep.

73s

K2OWK
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W9FIB
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Posts: 581




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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2014, 03:51:56 PM »

I have all my radios connected to a DC bus, which is hooked to a battery bank. I use a smart float charger (not Harbor Freight) to maintain my batteries to full capacity. I am set for 3 weeks with 2 radios on 24/7 receive. Obviously the time goes down depending how much time I transmit on either or both radios.

I also have a switch that I can change the bus from the batteries to a 30A Astron power supply. I do that once a month to keep all the electronics exercised. Otherwise it would sit for years without use. I have about 4 farad of supercaps across the bus to hold voltage during switch over.

I also have 12v lighting in my shack in case of a power failure. I have no windows in my shack.

Next project is a 120v/240V inverter set up. That way I have a basic UPS for the shack. Looking at a battery from an electric car. Less heat and waste to invert big DC voltage to big AC voltage.
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W8JX
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Posts: 5477




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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2014, 07:59:48 AM »

Next project is a 120v/240V inverter set up. That way I have a basic UPS for the shack. Looking at a battery from an electric car. Less heat and waste to invert big DC voltage to big AC voltage.

Good luck on this. A Prius battery is NMHi and208 volts but only about 6 amp hours and weighs about 85 lbs. They would no be cost effective even from a bone yard. A Chevy Volt uses a 370 volt 45 amp hour battery is Lithium and weighs about 440 pounds.
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W9FIB
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Posts: 581




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« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2014, 06:25:42 PM »

Next project is a 120v/240V inverter set up. That way I have a basic UPS for the shack. Looking at a battery from an electric car. Less heat and waste to invert big DC voltage to big AC voltage.

Good luck on this. A Prius battery is NMHi and208 volts but only about 6 amp hours and weighs about 85 lbs. They would no be cost effective even from a bone yard. A Chevy Volt uses a 370 volt 45 amp hour battery is Lithium and weighs about 440 pounds.

I really don't need engineering advice from some one dumb enough to run a generator in his garage.

Nor did I say what battery, when I am doing it, or how much capacity it will need. So again your facts are simply useless. After I define the need, put together a one line drawing of the design, then I can begin to look at what parts are available for what I need it to do.

And as in other threads what is NOT cost effective for YOU does not limit me to what I decide IS cost effective for ME.

Or to put it simply, I really do not care what you think. Nor do I need your advice or commentary.
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N6JSX
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Posts: 216




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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2014, 04:48:58 AM »

I have about 4 farad of supercaps across the bus to hold voltage during switch over.

I looked into these Super/Ultra-Caps.... OUCH! they are not cheap with most being ~2.3V so it takes at least six to get to 13.5V. Think I'll look for an old fashion 50K-75K >20VDC cap for the short-time bridge energy. Back in the '80's I did this on my VHF rig when living in LA where we got significant brown-out glitching - it helped keep the radio alive and scanning.  Sad

Why I ask is I have a new V-nose cargo trailer, I'm building a bench/shelf into the V-nose and will be mounting a few radios to the top-shelf to give me a mini-station (strapping the antenna mast to the roof ladder). I have a solar panel to mount to the roof and a 1KW gen too. I'm just feeling out the best/lightest weight methods to do all this. The trailer is for hauling my Lazy-boy+ between consulting jobs or store/take my Shiners go-kart to parades.  Grin
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W9FIB
Member

Posts: 581




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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2014, 06:49:51 AM »

I have about 4 farad of supercaps across the bus to hold voltage during switch over.

I looked into these Super/Ultra-Caps.... OUCH! they are not cheap with most being ~2.3V so it takes at least six to get to 13.5V. Think I'll look for an old fashion 50K-75K >20VDC cap for the short-time bridge energy. Back in the '80's I did this on my VHF rig when living in LA where we got significant brown-out glitching - it helped keep the radio alive and scanning.  Sad

Why I ask is I have a new V-nose cargo trailer, I'm building a bench/shelf into the V-nose and will be mounting a few radios to the top-shelf to give me a mini-station (strapping the antenna mast to the roof ladder). I have a solar panel to mount to the roof and a 1KW gen too. I'm just feeling out the best/lightest weight methods to do all this. The trailer is for hauling my Lazy-boy+ between consulting jobs or store/take my Shiners go-kart to parades.  Grin

Yes they can be expensive. I usually shop for deals on E-Bay. Have gotten them as low as $1 each.

Sounds like you got a great project going there. Good luck!
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W4CNG
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Posts: 178




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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2014, 01:46:15 PM »

I use an APC Brand 1500 watt UPS.  It has two 7A 12VDC batteries internally and an external plug to add a second unit with 6 more 7A batteries.  I took the two batteries out of the unit with their connecting cable.  I then bought two Group 27 Deep Discharge batteries and connected them in series and using the internal cord, plugged them into the external battery port on the unit.  It will run the HF and VHF stations (minus HF linear) for 10-12 hours.  I have a Mac computer, two 35A DC power supplies and a light above the desk running off of it.  No glitches and all is well.  If I drain it for testing, it takes 24 hours to fully recharge the batteries.
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W8JX
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Posts: 5477




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« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2014, 02:25:10 PM »

I use an APC Brand 1500 watt UPS.  It has two 7A 12VDC batteries internally and an external plug to add a second unit with 6 more 7A batteries.  I took the two batteries out of the unit with their connecting cable.  I then bought two Group 27 Deep Discharge batteries and connected them in series and using the internal cord, plugged them into the external battery port on the unit.  It will run the HF and VHF stations (minus HF linear) for 10-12 hours.  I have a Mac computer, two 35A DC power supplies and a light above the desk running off of it.  No glitches and all is well.  If I drain it for testing, it takes 24 hours to fully recharge the batteries.

I have a old fan cooled APC 1000 watt unit I got new many years ago. It has two 17 amp 12 volt gel cells in series to provide 24 volts for inverter and it has a auxiliary external battery pack that uses 4 17 amp hour gel cells in series parallel by factory design for a total capacity of 51 amp hours at 24 volts. It will power my network routers and modem and wireless router and a few other things for about 4 to 8hrs depending on load. You can daisy chain up to 4 external packs for a capacity of 152 amp hours at 24 volts or nearly 4kw of power stored. I have a few 600 watt units that use two 9ah 12 volt batteries in series too. The 9ah are drop in replacements for old 7ah ones and I have not bought a 7ah one for many year now. Upgraded them all long ago.
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