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Author Topic: New IC-7000, any other rig, or keep my old stuff?  (Read 13296 times)
N2RRA
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« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2013, 10:07:55 PM »

I've done plenty of testing between the TS-480 and IC-7000's owning 4 at one point. I love the IC-7000 and never had a problem with either one of them. Ran them both mobile in the hottest days and coldest winters. As a base as well and it's a very impressive little radio. Even gives the bigger brother IC-756 proIII a run for its money. The IC-7000 has much more capability than the TS-480. In fact I still own one of them and right next too it an IC-7600.

I fly through the menus and never have an issue functioning the radio. It's just a common sense radio and unless you have poor memory, poor hand and eye coordination, or fat fingers then you you should have zero problems.

The DSP receiving filters work great and well for fending off the EMI/RFI issues Hybrids have. No other mobile radio does a better job in a Hybrid.  I know....trust me!

The new IC-7100 is capable of so much more plus it's the only radio in the industry that's now touch screen with as many features. The only thing I don't care for is its not a color screen and the size of the head of the radio. Hey! Can't have it all your way, right?

You can always use transverter's to add a band and you still get to keep all its features on that band. Plus! If you obtain a service manual and look on YouTube you'll find the radio is capable of being tweaked to safely run up to 125 watts and increase receiver sensitivity and more on all bands. I've done it too mine!

I can't say enough about the radio, but it's obvious I'm a big fan.

Welcome and congrats on your new license and enjoy the hobby.

73!
N2RRA



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K0GGC
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Posts: 9




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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2013, 10:31:03 AM »

The reviews are starting to filter in from the new IC-7100. It appears to be a hit so far. Much better audio than the IC-7000 and runs a lot cooler. Not even warm after 3 hours of continuous operation with long winded conversations, rtty, and 100 watt SSB. The new touch screen interface is also a hit. Easier to use than the IC-7000 and better visibility in both shadows and direct light.

You might want to hold on a bit longer before buying the IC-7000.
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K1DA
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Posts: 500




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« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2013, 06:40:02 AM »

New radios are like busses, there's always another one on the way.    The good old 830 has a driver tube and two output tubes.  All the rest is solid state.  With your other radio see if you can hear a low level signal from the 830  by tuning around the frequency it is set for with the other radio while keying the 830 with the tube heaters OFF.  If you can hear a signal the 830 can usually be easily fixed. Hint:  a lot of us buy good test gear (usually used)  to chase these problems,  it's a "hidden expense" but worth it.  If your "extra class" friend couldn't learn some basic info about YOUR 830 just by looking at the plate meter when keying and so forth you ought to seek alternative help.  You can learn a LOT with a 50 dollar DVM and another receiver,  or you can stumple around in the dark when the only problem with an old radio might be  the high voltage  fuse. 
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K1DA
Member

Posts: 500




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« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2013, 06:50:25 AM »

At the very least you need a DVM, a dummy load, an SWR bridge/wattmeter   and another receiver to do some basic tests.  Sinking a lot of dough into the new "radio of the week" is not wise without these things , because no matter WHAT you buy you'll still be in the dark as to its function. .  The problem with buying a brand new radio, and a  "brand name" dipole and expecting it all to be "pulg and play" is that often it is not, especially the antenna, and without basic test instruments you won't have a clue.  (Even with the stuff sometimes you canse your tail until discovering for example, that that "preassembled" piece of coax has a shorted connector on it). 
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KK4RXN
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Posts: 120




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« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2013, 11:22:48 AM »

I'm doing well with the 820 - I've had 2 guys check it out, testing tubes, etc., and found out it had been sitting so long that a good shot of contact cleaner to the Load and Drive areas got the transmitter back up and going.

I'm taking it apart tonight to clean more of the connectors so I can get even more functionality out of it, but I have learned a WHOLE lot from the guys just sitting and taking it apart. They both agreed that it is a very clean, very nice radio. I'm going to keep it in honor of my Uncle John.

I am looking at an IC-7200. That unit really looks nice, too!

The General exam comes up this Saturday, so I'm studying all week this week. Maybe I'll treat myself to something new if/when I pass it!

Barry
KK4RXN
Jeremiah 29:11-13 / John 3:16
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Barry
KK4RXN
Jeremiah 29:11-13 / John 3:16
KK4RXN
Member

Posts: 120




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« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2013, 06:04:21 AM »

I haven't bought anything yet simply because my Yaesu FT-757GX Mark I hasn't sold. I don't need 3 rigs, so I'll keep shopping, but for now the IC-7000, 857D and 897 are still in the running.
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Barry
KK4RXN
Jeremiah 29:11-13 / John 3:16
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