Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Morse code progress questions.  (Read 4414 times)
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« on: July 26, 2013, 02:50:24 PM »

Years ago when I got my General ticket the test was 13 wpm.  For a margin of safety I was able to copy at about 15 to 17 wpm before I went in for my test.  I operated for several years and then there was a 20 year hiatus.  I don't think I ever hit 20 wpm but I never really worked at it either.

Since Field Day 2013 almost 5 weeks ago I began again from scratch.  I've been putting in a little time here and there and I'm just a hair under a solid 10 wpm copy.  Any guesstimates as to how much longer it will take me to get up to 15 wpm?  Does it go fairly fast after that?

I really would like to get above 25 wpm.  I'm wondering when I can expect to be up to that speed.  Any educated guesses from you guys?

I'm sure it depends upon how much time I put in.  I probably spend about an hour at a time 2 or 3 times a week and a few minutes here and there other days.

Thanks.
Logged
LB3KB
Member

Posts: 233


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2013, 02:57:55 PM »

10 WPM is counter-productive.  You'd be better off if you were getting 80% at 12 WPM or higher.


73
K4NL Sid
(a.k.a. LB3KB)
justlearnmorsecode.com
Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2013, 03:00:21 PM »

I push myself a little by doing 13 wpm too but I don't have an estimate of my accuracy.  A guess would be 60% +/-.
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1350


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2013, 03:57:45 PM »

Any guesstimates as to how much longer it will take me to get up to 15 wpm?

The absolute worst thing you can do is judge yourself by someone else's progress.

It will take you as long as it takes you. Don't sweat it and don't put yourself on some sort of timetable or schedule. You'll just be setting yourself up for disappointment.

The speed will come in its own time, I promise.

Just relax and enjoy working CW.
Logged
AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1235




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2013, 04:13:33 PM »

The speed will come in its own time, I promise.
Just relax and enjoy working CW.

100% agreement!  If you're using CW on a fairly regular basis, just enjoy yourself, have fun, and you'll find your speed increases and it will never feel like work!  I passed my 5wpm in 1991, spent a year having fun on 15M CW, and the next year when I went for my general, I took the 20wpm test as a warmup and passed it.  I never practiced a bit--just made some QSOs and had a BUNCH of fun!  N0IU is right; just have fun and you'll get faster without ever noticing it!  Smiley  73 GL!  --ken
Logged
LB3KB
Member

Posts: 233


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2013, 05:36:26 PM »

The point I was trying to make is that many people learning at counter-productive speeds have found themselves dealing with a plateau of serious problems when trying to get from < 12 WPM to > 12 WPM.

That's what makes speeds < 12 WPM counter-productive.

You're much better off starting out at a higher speed, even if it initially seems more difficult.


73
K4NL Sid
justlearnmorsecode.com
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3963




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2013, 10:29:36 PM »

Quote
The absolute worst thing you can do is judge yourself by someone else's progress.

It will take you as long as it takes you. Don't sweat it and don't put yourself on some sort of timetable or schedule. You'll just be setting yourself up for disappointment.

The speed will come in its own time, I promise.

Just relax and enjoy working CW. 
   

N0IU is right on!  There really isn't any hurry.  Right?  And you will no doubt make your 20WPM, if you want to.  Getting on the air will speed things up faster than anything else. 

There is a natural need to "go faster" when you're trying to have a conversation with someone than simply practicing.
Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2013, 06:16:11 AM »

RBN says I'm running about 11 to12 wpm but that's when I'm calling CQ to I'm probably 8 to 10 wpm during QSO.  I look for slower operators but when I can't find one slow enough I call CQ.

I used the SKCC SKED website the other night and set up a couple of QSOs.  Neat bunch hanging out there and very willing to work with me.

I'm chipping away at getting faster.  It should happen but I was just wondering 'when' I could expect to get up to speed.  Not in too big of a hurry but a little anxious to get there as I should be.

Thanks all.
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 1052




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2013, 07:36:19 AM »

As long as your "practice" is on the air, it will come all by itself. I suspect if you make one or two contacts each day, even short ones, you would be at 20 wpm in a month or so. What you want to do is be able to CONVERSE at 20 wpm, not have 100% copy of code groups at 20 wpm! As you know, there is a big difference between "conversational" code and random code. But sounds like you are on the air, you'll be there before you even know it.

paul
Logged
AB4O
Member

Posts: 34




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2013, 07:41:39 PM »

HVE, the skcc group are great. They have been so supportive in my quest for code. I just started and only know a few letters, but with such a great groups as skcc and fists it won't be long. Maybe we will work each other sometime.
John-AB4O
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1350


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2013, 11:22:41 PM »

....but I was just wondering 'when' I could expect to get up to speed.

September 28, 2013 at 8:47pm
Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2013, 07:41:06 AM »

....but I was just wondering 'when' I could expect to get up to speed.

September 28, 2013 at 8:47pm

Not exactly what I was looking for but I get your point.   Grin
Logged
W0ZF
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2013, 06:35:03 PM »

I've been 'on again/off again' with CW for over 30 years with some large 'off again' gaps...each time I'd get going again, I'd do exactly what you're doing - start slow (less than 10 wpm) and try to build speed.  I've come to the conclusion that that's a mistake (at least for me).

I've started back on CW again this summer.  What I've been doing lately is listening a lot at 20-25 wpm, just to see how much I can copy in my head.  Seems to be working. At first I got almost nothing except common stuff (CQ, FB, 73, etc.), but before long I started to pick out more.  It's a lot less frustrating when you can just listen without trying to write it down letter by letter.  I just write stuff like the person's call and signal report.

I can't say that I'm 'conversational' yet at those speeds, and still lose my train of thought and miss words, but I think it works better for me to do it that way.  Hope folks don't get too upset if they hear "AGN?" from me a time or two...

As others have said, you can hit a 'plateau' around 13 wpm if you start slow and work your way up.  If you start at a faster speed, you quickly find that slower code (less than about 15 wpm) is actually harder to copy because it takes so long to get the words across that you lose track of the conversation.  At least that seems to be what happens to me - your mileage may vary, as they say.

I find that it's generally easy to send faster than i can copy, so i figure it's best to listen a lot and concentrate on copying well.
The most important part is to get on the air at whatever speed you can and have fun. 
73 de W0ZF
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!