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Author Topic: Robotic  (Read 2236 times)
N9AOP
Member

Posts: 149




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« on: August 19, 2013, 10:08:58 AM »

I came across an article from March regarding a Begali key and someone wrote that we shouldn't bother with an expensive key when we could all use software and the keyboard to send perfect code.  That would make backpacking an adventure with all the additional stuff you would need to carry.

That got me to thinking about how fast technology is going and the fact that we could have a completely automated CW station for field day in a couple of years.  Just think of it, you could sit back drinking beer or Yukon Jack and get wasted while at the same time maintaining a quality score.
Art
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W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1773




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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2013, 11:34:42 AM »

  Automatic CW, auto tuner, auto logging and a computer with PS, why bother just leave it all at the QTH and bring extra Yukon Jack, beer, then sit back tell sea stories and enjoy yourselves and to hell with quality scores.
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GILGSN
Member

Posts: 207




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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2013, 07:43:23 PM »

Automatic technology that only appeals to contesters... There is more to CW than contests... Certainly, carrying a computer on a backpacking trip would be a major pain. My CW rig fits in my shirt pocket. Why would I bother with a computer? A good key makes operating stress-free and more enjoyable. You also don't improve your skills by letting a computer do things for you. A "completely automated CW station," really? What am I going to chat about with it? Talk about lazyness... I bet the guy who said not to bother with an expensive key can't see his feet when he looks down...

Gil.
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GW3OQK
Member

Posts: 155




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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 06:36:19 AM »

I heard a W in in qso with some EUs. He was sending PERFECT morse, fluently using the language of the EU, complete with full words and accented letters. After saying bon soir to the F, he had a qso in perfect German. I was ready to call him and try him out in Welsh but a high powered YU came up.

Supposing he has computer help does it translate incoming messages to English? OR could it all be robotic?

73
Andrew GW3OQK
Mae hen wlad fy nhadau yn annwyl i mi,
 Gwlad beirdd a chantorion, enwogion o fri;
 Ei gwrol ryfelwyr, gwladgarwyr tra mad,
 Dros ryddid collasant eu gwaed.


 
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




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« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2013, 01:17:31 PM »

Welsh should certainly be possible for someone who (a) knows Welsh; (b) knows International Morse with necessary accents/umlauts/circumfleces ... and perhaps (c) a bilingual spellchecker.  I can hold my own in Japanese, using "wabun", which is syllabic rather than one letter at a time...more convenient.

Europeans typically speak several languages fluently, and it shouldn't come as too much of a surprise to hear EU hams switching languages on CW as readily as on SSB.

I was visiting Simo Hoikka, a Finnish ham who was, at the time, the Southeast Asia manager for Nokia and operating out of Singapore (1993).  I got to operate his station (using his call, darn it!).  Lots of east African DX I have never heard before or since...but every time an OH station broke the pileup, Simo took over and used Finnish -- complete with some real eartwisters!  I flinched every time, and he was cracking up but still sending perfect Finnish.  At least as far as I could tell!
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2289




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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2013, 07:41:16 AM »

That got me to thinking about how fast technology is going and the fact that we could have a completely automated CW station for field day in a couple of years.  Just think of it, you could sit back drinking beer or Yukon Jack and get wasted while at the same time maintaining a quality score.
Art

A grainy picture of "Z80 OP", which made the first automated CW QSO's in 1986 Field Day, is in this powerpoint:

http://www.kkn.net/~tree/ContestBanquet.ppt
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