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Author Topic: I want talkback on my FT857  (Read 1613 times)
KI4DSC
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Posts: 65




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« on: August 23, 2013, 12:35:48 PM »

I want to use a head phone / microphone headset that I own now.  The headset is my aviation head set and they are quite comfortable for extended use.

Once upon a time I had a radio that had a setting in the menu for "talkback" so as you transmitted with a headset you could hear yourself talking.  The feature helps keep you from speaking too softly or too loudly when using noise canceling headphones.  I can not find a way to turn this on on my yaesu FT857.  Is there a simple way to get what I want without doing surgery on my radio?

Tom
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12892




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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 01:19:35 PM »

It's called "transmit monitor" on some radios. I didn't see any indication that it is available in the FT857 manual. The problem with what you want to do on most radios that have "transmit monitor" is that there is no independent volume adjustment for it. You'd likely be constantly changing the volume control setting when going between transmit and receive.

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KI4DSC
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2013, 02:02:16 PM »

AA4PB,

Thanks for the response.  I figured I was out of luck.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2407




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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2013, 09:06:18 AM »

Historically, the feature you want is called "Sidetone", and was originally developed for CW ops.  It is not very common for voice ops. 

If there is any delay in the circuit, it can cause the operator to be hesitant and feel uncoordinated, which is undesirable.

As mentioned some recent radios have a 'monitor' function which is intended to allow the operator to sample the internal signal for equalization, clipping, etc.  How well this works is debatable  by the audio experts.

b.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1482




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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2013, 11:10:01 AM »

If you are using something like a David-Clark you could make a tiny op-amp circuit that takes the audio from the mic and provides gain and pushes it back to the headphone.

Op-Amps are high-Z input devices so the loading on the microphone element would be very minimal. It should not be a problem with the audio output to the headphone either.

Mount the op-amp on a very tiny piece of perf-board, power it off of a tiny lithium battery. Install a tiny switch on the body of one of the earpiece and install the circuit under the foam insert on the headset.

There will not be a delay issue as the audio is not being converted to digital and you can change the value of the feedback resistor on the op-amp to set the gain.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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