Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Restricted Antenna/Band Realities... what can I expect?  (Read 51712 times)
W6UV
Member

Posts: 537




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2013, 01:56:42 PM »

As someone who lived in antenna-restricted locations for the majority of my ham career, I have this analogy to offer:

Working DX on the HF bands with compromise/stealth antennas is like plowing a 40 acre field with horse-drawn plow. Do-able, but painful and time consuming. Working DX  with non-compromise antennas is like plowing the same field with a diesel tractor.
Logged
KJ4OBR
Member

Posts: 104




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2013, 10:00:02 AM »

If all you've got is a horse-drawn plow you can dream about the John Deere all you want.. but you still need to harness up Bessie if you want to plow.


As someone who lived in antenna-restricted locations for the majority of my ham career, I have this analogy to offer:

Working DX on the HF bands with compromise/stealth antennas is like plowing a 40 acre field with horse-drawn plow. Do-able, but painful and time consuming. Working DX  with non-compromise antennas is like plowing the same field with a diesel tractor.
Logged
N3LCW
Member

Posts: 134




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: October 26, 2013, 10:25:12 AM »

Cory,

First, welcome to amateur radio and to those of us in the ranks with limited antenna options.

More amateurs should post photos of their yards as you did, it helps a lot for an antenna layout plan.

The tree cover will be your best bet.  If you want to keep it simple, effective, and convenient to use I would suggest an inverted L starting in the corner by that palm tree, fed with a remote mounted autotuner at that feedpoint.  Get a pair of those low cost telescoping fiberglass poles, 20 feet will do for your location.  S9 used to market them but LDG now does.  You can do cheaper by buying a set of 20 foot crappie telescoping fishing poles.  I bought a box of 5 for 25$ a few years ago.

Mount 1 pole alongside the palm tree, and the second pole to be mounted would be as far to the left of that photo as possible.   The palm tree mounted pole would be where you feed the inverted L wire.  Keep the poles extended within the treeline cover.  The wire (black insulated thin gauge, 22 will be nice and unobtrusive) runs up to the top of that pole and then across to the pole at left.  Mount an autotuner at the base of the pole by the palm tree.  You can run a pair of counterpoise wires elevated 6 inches to a foot above the ground along side what looks like a fence line.  The counterpoise wires attach to the autotuner ground.  If you can, drive a ground rod at the base of the antenna also and attach that.  That will get you on the air with a very effective signal for 40M  - 10M with the ease of switching bands.  No tuning, trimming, or any other bother.  That antenna, even low as it is, will get you on the air very effectively enough to enjoy the HF bands.

What you want to do is mitigate ground losses and you can do that effectively even with a limited number of elevated counterpoise wires.

As time goes on you'll find ways to install effective antennas by manipulating where in the cycle you feed them based on your specific location and needs, but that's a topic for another day.  You will find a correctly laid out length of a 5$ spool of wire will easily outperform any costly commercial shortened HF antenna.

Please read my QRZ info and feel free to contact me at my ARRL.net address directly.

Andy
N3LCW


Logged
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 646




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: November 22, 2013, 12:46:25 PM »

For what it's worth, 2 weekends ago I worked Japan voice on 10 meters with a Hygain AV-18VQ2 loaded vertical. It's not a true hidden antenna, but at 18 feet tall it's short enough to be hidden in amongst the trees if you paint it green or black.
Logged
W1VT
Member

Posts: 821




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2013, 05:36:17 AM »

My QRZ.com page shows a 20 ft flagpole "hidden" in plain sight.  With an autotuner at  the feedpoint I've made lots of contacts on all the bands from 40 through 10 meters.

I have elevated radials in the bushes and under the wheelchair ramp, as well as a radial buried in the yard--I plan to add a few more buried radials in the yard this Spring, when I convert more of the lawn to a huge rose bed.
The Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005 may allow this antenna even in areas with strict residential management, covenant, and HOA issues.


Zack Lau W1VT
« Last Edit: December 12, 2013, 05:43:12 AM by W1VT » Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!