Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Best Log for QSL Mangement/ award tracking  (Read 100938 times)
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1740




Ignore
« Reply #45 on: September 03, 2013, 05:38:12 PM »

This is an online forum, not a QSO. When users seek recommendations or post questions, it is appropriate to respond; I will continue to do so.

      73,

           Dave, AA6YQ

You missed the point but it doesn't really matter. I just hope you are making some sort of contribution to subscribe to eHam since they are letting you use their bandwidth for your product.

I am beginning to think Dave has Blinders on. He sees only what he wants to see.

His slick attempt to discredit me and HRD (no I did not miss that one Dave) further show his contempt for anyone that would dare to have a differing opinion of DXlabs.

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
AA6YQ
Member

Posts: 1593


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #46 on: September 03, 2013, 07:12:14 PM »


I am beginning to think Dave has Blinders on. He sees only what he wants to see.

His slick attempt to discredit me and HRD (no I did not miss that one Dave) further show his contempt for anyone that would dare to have a differing opinion of DXlabs.

I have no contempt for you whatsoever, Stan; nothing I've posted comes anywhere close to such a sentiment. You've made it clear that you strongly prefer a user interface based on menus and the Multiple Document Interface; that's your choice, and I respect it.

      73,

            Dave, AA6YQ
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1292


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #47 on: September 04, 2013, 03:59:12 AM »

Might as well give it up Stan. Obviously Dave has the blessing of the admins to use eHam as an extension of his own website.
Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1740




Ignore
« Reply #48 on: September 04, 2013, 05:41:23 AM »

Might as well give it up Stan.

Giving up is not my nature. As long as Dave continues his constant advertising in every Logger/Digital thread here on eham, I may perhaps continue to inform hams of other Logger/Digital software that actually conforms and looks like a Windows Program.Software that is intuitive and performs with the need of a college course to understand how to use.

Dave is getting quite blatant in his attempts to push DXLabs into every Logger/Digital discussion. Many hams agree with me but few will publicly post what they really think about DxLabs. If DxLabs were to charge $100 like HRD or even $50 it would fail miserably in popularity. It is free for a reason...  Wink

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 840




Ignore
« Reply #49 on: September 04, 2013, 06:08:14 AM »

This topic is very confusing, a lot more confusing than any technical issue I've run across since getting back into ham radio several months ago. Back when I was still active you mailed QSL cards. Seems now that is pretty much an anachronism. So other than setting up a database in a spreadsheet, I need to use one of these programs to confirm the QSO happened.

I do see that LoTW is sortof tied into ARRL/Yeasu and seems pretty "official". Let's put it this way - if I used LoTW would it be a bad choice?  Huh
Logged

K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1740




Ignore
« Reply #50 on: September 04, 2013, 06:35:16 AM »

I do see that LoTW is sortof tied into ARRL/Yeasu and seems pretty "official". Let's put it this way - if I used LoTW would it be a bad choice?  Huh

That depends. If you have 1000's of QSL cards like I do LOTW can be very helpful.

You may want to trade QSL cards but if you are just interested in Awards then LOTW might be the way to go. OTOH you may want to collect QSL' cards, many hams like them.

I do both. I never initiate a QSL card any more however I will respond to one sent to me. I also upload to LOTW frequently. You may want to look at e-QSL also especially if you want to paper your wall with QSLs. While e-QSL is not as respected as LOTW and DXCC it is an interesting way to get QSL cards. You print the cards received on your computer printer using card stock and most of them can not be told from a real sent QSL.

LOTW is pretty painless these days. Almost all loggers support easy upload of LOTW.

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
K6XT
Member

Posts: 26




Ignore
« Reply #51 on: September 04, 2013, 06:41:44 AM »

Recently, I began looking at various logging/station support programs. I'm almost finished with my trial period of HRD.  It took about a day to get everything up and running, and to become comfortable with the program suite.  The logbook/dx cluster/rig control/rotor control works very well together. It's basically pick a station off the cluster, the log book prepares to log the contact, make the exchange, and save it in the logbook.  A few mouse clicks and it's done.  The rotor control program automatically turns the beam towards the intended contact. I haven't experimented with the digital program (DM780), or the satellite tracker.  Nevertheless, I have been very happy using HRD. 

I also want to look at Commcat as well.  I like the fact that Commcat offers an interface for remote operation using Apple "i" products.  I suppose, most of these program suites produce the same end results, the real differences is the user interface.  DXLabs seems like a one man show, a lot of posters in support of DXLabs kept referencing the same thing over and over, Dave this and Dave that. That is all fine and well, unless he becomes unavailable, then all support will stop.

73


Dave's nonavailability was thoroughly covered in a thread on the DXLabSuite reflector recently. Dave has established a team of (I presume) like-minded software gurus who will continue his work should he be erased tomorrow. Heaven forbid Dave!

Reading thru this thread it seems like there's been some degeneration. I hope not to add to that with my opinion. Moving from paper to a PC, I essentially restarted DXCC and award tracking in 1989 with WJ2O's DOS program. In an effort to free myself completely from DOS (still unresolved) after trying out the available programs I migrated to DX4WIN. It didn't go smoothly, but it went. Happy as a clam, DX4WIN served for a while. Then I noticed it had been a long time since the last update, and I had some issues go unresolved, so I got restless and looked around again. There were many more options available at that time.

After a few trials I thought DXLabSuite looked like the way to go. However this was before the suite's Launcher application (it installs itself and all the rest of the suite applications more or less automatically). I was a bit befuddled by the need to manually integrate the suite, so hung out with DX4WIN a bit longer. Finally biting the bullet I tried the Suite again and by now the Launcher existed. So I've been around the block on award-tracking loggers (contest loggers too, but that's a different story).

And never looked back since. While I don't always agree with Dave's way of doing things, he has the important stuff covered. Like data security, i.e. how safe is my log. Award tracking. Interoperability. Crashworthiness - DXLabSuite never crashes. Windows might expire, and does, but not the Suite. Following a BSOD there's my log, safe and sound. Personally I appreciate the modularity of the Suite because, when I'm setting up something new or recovering from my frequent screwups I can concentrate on just one area and one application.

Like any "new thing" it does take some effort to learn the ropes if the goal is to dig in. On the other hand the Suite can quite effectively use the defaults. The new user can just install it application by application and start logging Q's.

One cannot recommend the Suite without mentioning support. The Suite author AA6YQ is not only a DXer himself, he's always within a day or so of replying to questions. Usually within hours, but he does take vacations and go on DXpeditions. Plus there are a large number of expert users available when Dave's not around. Its the best software support I've ever seen since I began using PC's in about 1980.

73 Art K6XT
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 840




Ignore
« Reply #52 on: September 04, 2013, 06:59:24 AM »

That depends. If you have 1000's of QSL cards like I do LOTW can be very helpful.

You may want to trade QSL cards but if you are just interested in Awards then LOTW might be the way to go. OTOH you may want to collect QSL' cards, many hams like them.

Yea I want to collect them, just like the old days. I do not care about awards at all (at least for now). So what exactly is LoTW? Just something to verify awards?

Quote
I do both. I never initiate a QSL card any more however I will respond to one sent to me. I also upload to LOTW frequently. You may want to look at e-QSL also especially if you want to paper your wall with QSLs. While e-QSL is not as respected as LOTW and DXCC it is an interesting way to get QSL cards. You print the cards received on your computer printer using card stock and most of them can not be told from a real sent QSL.

That sounds OK with me, if I can print one and collect them it would be OK.

But if you can bear with me for a minute ...

I guess what I am not "getting" is how it's all coordinated and verified. I'm sure I can figure out any software package I choose.

What I don't yet understand is, say I use eQSL, and Joe Bob uses LoTW, and Sarah uses DX Labs, and so on. How is it all coordinated? What If I use eQSL and Joe Bob refuses to use it? How do I get his QSL "card" or verification? Is it like the old saysing "That's what I love about standards - there are so many to choose from"?
Logged

K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1740




Ignore
« Reply #53 on: September 04, 2013, 08:57:53 AM »


Yea I want to collect them, just like the old days. I do not care about awards at all (at least for now). So what exactly is LoTW? Just something to verify awards?

I guess what I am not "getting" is how it's all coordinated and verified. I'm sure I can figure out any software package I choose.

What I don't yet understand is, say I use eQSL, and Joe Bob uses LoTW, and Sarah uses DX Labs, and so on. How is it all coordinated? What If I use eQSL and Joe Bob refuses to use it? How do I get his QSL "card" or verification? Is it like the old saysing "That's what I love about standards - there are so many to choose from"?

Your ham logger merely collects the QSO information and Uploads that info to a e-QSL or LOTW server. Eqsl is not secure and it is easy cheat e-QSL. Why anyone would do this is subject for another thread. LOTW is secure and for serious Award hunters. e-QSL is for grins and papering your wall fast and cheap.Note that e-QSL printed cards by themselves are not eligible for the DXCC award.

LOTW= LogBook of the World and is run by the ARRL and contacts verified are eligible for all ARRL awards, the most important being DXCC. Your logger uploads to LOTW. When the other party uploads their log and both logs match you receive credit for that QSO.

You can upload at your convenience. I do it weekly. Not everybody uses LOTW but it is getting more popular all the time. There are about 65000 worldwide users of LOTW right now. My confirmation rate on LOTW is about 42% at this time. However I have gotten many confirmations from 10 year or even older QSOes. This is because a Ham finally decides to use LOTW and uploads their whole log which may got back quite away. As long as your log and their log matches you get credit for the QSO. No Time Limit.

Another interesting perk of LOTW is you can know if the Ham is a LOTW user BEFORE you make the contact. I believe most loggers support this. Hope this helps a little.

Stan K9IUQ
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 09:04:20 AM by K9IUQ » Logged
K6XT
Member

Posts: 26




Ignore
« Reply #54 on: September 04, 2013, 09:38:10 AM »


Yea I want to collect them, just like the old days. I do not care about awards at all (at least for now). So what exactly is LoTW? Just something to verify awards?

But if you can bear with me for a minute ...

I guess what I am not "getting" is how it's all coordinated and verified. I'm sure I can figure out any software package I choose.

What I don't yet understand is, say I use eQSL, and Joe Bob uses LoTW, and Sarah uses DX Labs, and so on. How is it all coordinated? What If I use eQSL and Joe Bob refuses to use it? How do I get his QSL "card" or verification? Is it like the old saysing "That's what I love about standards - there are so many to choose from"?

This is a bit of apples and oranges Mike. Eqsl and LoTW are award granting services of Eqsl and ARRL respectively. Other than accepting log uploads (adif files) they have nothing to do with loggers. That's where award tracking loggers like DXLabSuite, DX4WIN, many more, and contest loggers like N1MM, Writelog etc. come in. These programs are your personal interface between QSO's (the data) and being able to use the data for some purpose that you enjoy, such as applying to Eqsl or LoTW for an award resulting from your accumulation of QSO's.

The award tracking loggers keep track of your stats, provide easy ways to upload to the award granters, print QSL's and address labels, keep track of QSL status (sent, received, still waiting, verified by LoTW, etc), interface with your rig for current frequency and mode, switch and rotate your antennas, keep your log safe on your PC etc.

But even if you don't want to partake of awards there is good reason to send your log to LoTW. When you do, a copy of QSO's you upload is "forever" stored on a computer someplace other than your place. So it is another safeguard against data loss.

Also take a look into ClubLog www.clublog.org. This is another way to see how you're doing award wise but more important, another place to store a copy of your log, off your PC. And its a tad easier to get a copy of your log than is LoTW. TTBOMK Clublog does not issue awards but does show DXCC and CQZone wise what you've worked and displays award tracking in unique ways. Clublog organizes groups of hams into "leagues" so its really easy to have a friendly little competition with your ham friend down the street or local club collecting bandmode QSO's, if that's of interest.

Summarizing, you may not today be interested in awards. Keep plugging, you probably will one day. There's more reason than awards to upload your Q's to one of the services.
Logged
AA6YQ
Member

Posts: 1593


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #55 on: September 04, 2013, 09:54:57 AM »

If DxLabs were to charge $100 like HRD or even $50 it would fail miserably in popularity. It is free for a reason...  Wink

DXLab is free because amateur radio is my hobby, not my business. I enjoy developing software in collaboration with users who provide rapid feedback and critique, and I enjoy exploring new software engineering techniques in a hands-on way.

No amount of money can match the joy of receiving email from a user describing how your software has expanded his or her enjoyment of amateur radio and radically increased his or her prowess as a DXer.

      73,

            Dave, AA6YQ
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 840




Ignore
« Reply #56 on: September 04, 2013, 02:21:44 PM »

So I as understand it now, the .adif file (Amateur Data Interchange Format) is the standard log file for ham radio logging. Would I be wrong in then assuming that this type of file is transportable between the popular logging programs?

If so I guess it's no big deal to start using one and then change to another program, since the data would be imported and not locked into one particular logging program's file format.
Logged

K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1740




Ignore
« Reply #57 on: September 04, 2013, 02:34:50 PM »

So I as understand it now, the .adif file (Amateur Data Interchange Format) is the standard log file for ham radio logging. Would I be wrong in then assuming that this type of file is transportable between the popular logging programs?

If so I guess it's no big deal to start using one and then change to another program, since the data would be imported and not locked into one particular logging program's file format.

Yep, no big deal as  the adif file is a standard that all loggers use. Adif files are Transportable. Which means if You try DXLabs and find it not to your liking you can merely change to a better logger and take your QSO information with you.  Wink

Instead of advertising or advocating the use of the Logger I use (Commcat), I tell hams to do the intelligent thing:

Try all the loggers out, they have a free trial. Figure out what works for YOU.

You will lose nothing and gain valuable knowledge about how loggers differ.

If you have never used a PC logger before I highly recommend you stay away from DXLabs until you get more experience. DXLabs is not intuitive and has a very Steep Learning Curve. You could get so frustrated you go back to a paper Log. Save the DXLabs trial/test for last..

Stan K9IUQ
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 02:43:47 PM by K9IUQ » Logged
AA6YQ
Member

Posts: 1593


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #58 on: September 04, 2013, 02:46:01 PM »

So I as understand it now, the .adif file (Amateur Data Interchange Format) is the standard log file for ham radio logging. Would I be wrong in then assuming that this type of file is transportable between the popular logging programs?

If so I guess it's no big deal to start using one and then change to another program, since the data would be imported and not locked into one particular logging program's file format.

ADIF is an "interchange specification" that allows applications to exchange log data in a mutually understandable format. ADIF does not require applications to support all items of information -- so if you've recorded your QSO partners' email addresses, your current logging application may or may not export this information to an ADIF file, and the next logging application you try may or may not import this information.

In practice, most applications that claim ADIF compliance will import and export a core set of information: callsign, date, time, band, and mode. For DXers, the most important field that's not a part of this core set is the "DXCC country code"; without it, an importing application will have no way of setting the DXCC entity for an imported QSO with an ambiguous callsign like TO1DX or E51RY.

Thus when considering a logging application, check to see what information it can export to an ADIF file, and what information it can import from an ADIF file. This information should be readily available in the application's documentation.

      73,

             Dave, AA6YQ
Logged
AA6YQ
Member

Posts: 1593


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #59 on: September 04, 2013, 02:56:35 PM »

If you have never used a PC logger before I highly recommend you stay away from DXLabs until you get more experience. DXLabs is not intuitive and has a very Steep Learning Curve. You could get so frustrated you go back to a paper Log. Save the DXLabs trial/test for last..

There are more than 100 eHam reviews of DXLab that show Stan's opinion to be that of a small minority.

    73,

         Dave, AA6YQ

Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!