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Author Topic: Say "HI" to Juno!  (Read 83111 times)
KD0L
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Posts: 21




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« on: September 02, 2013, 07:05:06 AM »

The Juno Jupiter orbiter was launched in August 2011.  On October 9th, it will fly by the Earth for a gravity assist to gain enough energy to get to Jupiter.

One of the instruments on board Juno named Waves, is sensitive to radio signals between 50Hz and 40MHz.  I am the Waves Principal Engineer.  We calculate that when Juno is within 50,000km of earth, we should be able to detect a coordinated transmission in the 10m band, so we are trying to get enough amateurs to participate to radiate sufficient power to get above our detection threshold.

Details (subject to refinement) are available at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/hijuno/

The basic idea is to transmit slow CW (1/25th wpm, 30 seconds per dit) which will allow us to decode the message out of outr science telemetry.

73,
Don - KD0L
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KO4MA
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Posts: 119




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« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 07:18:19 PM »

Neat project, I've forwarded to the AMSAT News Service editor, as well as Tweeted about it via the AMSAT account.

73, Drew KO4MA
AMSAT VP Ops
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KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 08:00:39 PM »

Neat project, I've forwarded to the AMSAT News Service editor, as well as Tweeted about it via the AMSAT account.

73, Drew KO4MA
AMSAT VP Ops

Thanks!  Look for an updated web site in about a week, which will try to answer a number of comments we have already received.

73, Don KD0L
Waves Principal Engineer
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NK7Z
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Posts: 737


WWW

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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 09:58:11 PM »

The Juno Jupiter orbiter was launched in August 2011.  On October 9th, it will fly by the Earth for a gravity assist to gain enough energy to get to Jupiter.

One of the instruments on board Juno named Waves, is sensitive to radio signals between 50Hz and 40MHz.  I am the Waves Principal Engineer.  We calculate that when Juno is within 50,000km of earth, we should be able to detect a coordinated transmission in the 10m band, so we are trying to get enough amateurs to participate to radiate sufficient power to get above our detection threshold.

Details (subject to refinement) are available at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/hijuno/

The basic idea is to transmit slow CW (1/25th wpm, 30 seconds per dit) which will allow us to decode the message out of outr science telemetry.

73,
Don - KD0L
What fun that would be!  Too bad it is not passing over the US during perigee...  I would lover to try this...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 10:58:33 PM »

What fun that would be!  Too bad it is not passing over the US during perigee...  I would lover to try this...

You'll have to talk to Isaac Newton about the perigee location, but you shouldn't be discouraged from joining in.  Using Goldstone as a proxy, Juno is above the horizon for a good fraction of the inbound pass.  Even when it goes below the horizon, the US will be in daylight and we'll get appreciable refraction over the horizon.  I worked Brazil on 10 the other day so even if conditions are bad, we should be able to get signals from the US to Juno on the way in. 

So as I see it, North and South America are prime for the inbound part of the pass, Europe and Asia will be favored on the way out.  Unfortunately we don't have the time or resources to do a ray tracing analysis to find out the optimal location for terrestrial transmitters to hit Juno at 28MHz, and even if we did, we'd have to guess at the input plasma densities.

So the best we can do is get as many participants as possible and try to get this thing seriously above noise level with intelligent modulation.

Google: "A search for life on Earth from the Galileo spacecraft", by Carl Sagan, et al, Nature 1993.

73,
Don - KD0L
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NK7Z
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Posts: 737


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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 12:10:47 AM »

What fun that would be!  Too bad it is not passing over the US during perigee...  I would lover to try this...

You'll have to talk to Isaac Newton about the perigee location, but you shouldn't be discouraged from joining in.  Using Goldstone as a proxy, Juno is above the horizon for a good fraction of the inbound pass.  Even when it goes below the horizon, the US will be in daylight and we'll get appreciable refraction over the horizon.  I worked Brazil on 10 the other day so even if conditions are bad, we should be able to get signals from the US to Juno on the way in. 

So as I see it, North and South America are prime for the inbound part of the pass, Europe and Asia will be favored on the way out.  Unfortunately we don't have the time or resources to do a ray tracing analysis to find out the optimal location for terrestrial transmitters to hit Juno at 28MHz, and even if we did, we'd have to guess at the input plasma densities.

So the best we can do is get as many participants as possible and try to get this thing seriously above noise level with intelligent modulation.

Google: "A search for life on Earth from the Galileo spacecraft", by Carl Sagan, et al, Nature 1993.

73,
Don - KD0L
Hi,

So what exactly are you attempting to learn from this?  It must be fun to be able to work on these projects for you!
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 08:03:38 AM »

Hi,

So what exactly are you attempting to learn from this?  It must be fun to be able to work on these projects for you!

Well, the instrument is designed to measure radio and plasma waves at Jupiter.  Earth is the only magnetosphere we will encounter before getting to our destination, so is the best place to test how it responds to real signals.  This gives us the opportunity to adjust our software if something needs tweaked.

Part of the motivation for the ham radio experiment is the paper by Carl Sagan, when we flew by Earth with Galileo, he wanted to know if it could detect life, using instruments designed for planetary exploration.  While other instruments could detect oxygen, which is a good sign, our radio instrument was the only thing that provided evidence of "intelligent" life, by detecting carriers of SW broadcast stations with apparent modulation.  These are not signals we see at other planets, so have no natural explanation.  We will again be detecting those, and will take waveform captures, but the segments of waveform are only about 1ms long, so we can't expect to decode any intelligent content out of it.

Another part of the motivation is public outreach, raising awareness both the Juno project and amateur radio.  After all, how often to you get the chance to do something that is directly detectable by a major planetary spacecraft?

73,
Don- KD0L
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NK7Z
Member

Posts: 737


WWW

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« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2013, 08:44:13 AM »

Hi,

So what exactly are you attempting to learn from this?  It must be fun to be able to work on these projects for you!

Well, the instrument is designed to measure radio and plasma waves at Jupiter.  Earth is the only magnetosphere we will encounter before getting to our destination, so is the best place to test how it responds to real signals.  This gives us the opportunity to adjust our software if something needs tweaked.

Part of the motivation for the ham radio experiment is the paper by Carl Sagan, when we flew by Earth with Galileo, he wanted to know if it could detect life, using instruments designed for planetary exploration.  While other instruments could detect oxygen, which is a good sign, our radio instrument was the only thing that provided evidence of "intelligent" life, by detecting carriers of SW broadcast stations with apparent modulation.  These are not signals we see at other planets, so have no natural explanation.  We will again be detecting those, and will take waveform captures, but the segments of waveform are only about 1ms long, so we can't expect to decode any intelligent content out of it.

Another part of the motivation is public outreach, raising awareness both the Juno project and amateur radio.  After all, how often to you get the chance to do something that is directly detectable by a major planetary spacecraft?

73,
Don- KD0L

Thanks for covering that, not surprising modulated AM like SWL transmitters are not around save for intelligent creators...  A good detection point!  Will the raw data be made available publicly?
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2013, 09:26:25 AM »

Thanks for covering that, not surprising modulated AM like SWL transmitters are not around save for intelligent creators...  A good detection point!  Will the raw data be made available publicly?

Yes, the data will eventually be placed in the Planetary Data System.  What timeframe that will be in I'm not certain.  Part of the requirement for placing the data there is that it be there be a level 0 or raw data plus a calibrated data set, and part of our EFB exercise will be looking at the data and validating the calibrations.
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NK7Z
Member

Posts: 737


WWW

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« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2013, 09:32:01 AM »

Thanks for covering that, not surprising modulated AM like SWL transmitters are not around save for intelligent creators...  A good detection point!  Will the raw data be made available publicly?

Yes, the data will eventually be placed in the Planetary Data System.  What timeframe that will be in I'm not certain.  Part of the requirement for placing the data there is that it be there be a level 0 or raw data plus a calibrated data set, and part of our EFB exercise will be looking at the data and validating the calibrations.
Thank you for sharing all of this information!!! 
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2013, 12:19:07 PM »

The website has been updated with corrected/modified/clarified content.  Thanks to all who supplied feedback.
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KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2013, 12:15:38 PM »

As an aside, the Juno instrument is a direct descendant of the Voyager Plasma Wave instrument that just confirmed the first passage into interstellar space.  I was an undergraduate when I helped build the Voyager instruments.

http://www.space.com/22729-voyager-1-spacecraft-interstellar-space.html?cid=51463011847964
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KG7DRO
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2013, 04:26:41 PM »

Very interesting project!
As a new Ham, with only my 2 meter Handy Talkie, my question to the Community is... if you are planning to broadcast HI to Juno on 10 meters, what equipment are you planning to use? What transmitter, antenna, key, etc? Will you be using Homebrew or store bought gear? How about a directional antenna? So many questions, that's what I love about being an Amateur operator!
We should make so much noise for Juno's passing!

73
KG7DRO Dave
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KD0L
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2013, 06:48:34 PM »

Very interesting project!
As a new Ham, with only my 2 meter Handy Talkie, my question to the Community is... if you are planning to broadcast HI to Juno on 10 meters, what equipment are you planning to use? What transmitter, antenna, key, etc? Will you be using Homebrew or store bought gear? How about a directional antenna? So many questions, that's what I love about being an Amateur operator!
We should make so much noise for Juno's passing!

73
KG7DRO Dave

Dave,

First, welcome!

I can give you an idea of what we are planning to do, although we haven't pulled it off yet.  the University club is going to set up on the top of the physics building.  I'll bring my equipment in, an FT1000MP and a linear amplifier.  Somebody else is donating a tribander.  The club will advertise the opportunity to "contact an interplanetary spacecraft" to build interest in the club, and we will give non-hams the chance to hold the key down during the active intervals. I will probably homebrew up an AFSK circuit and use a keyer for ID so we can keep the power level up during the ID.  I might even bring in an antique Hungarian camelback key for the main key.

For you, I would advise finding an established ham who more than likely has an older rig he would let you borrow.  For an antenna, I once built a rotatable dipole for 10 meters using two pieces of aluminum tubing from the hardware store, 6 Ubolts, a piece of wood and section of antenna mast.  I hauled it out on the back deck, hooked up an ICOM 706 with a car battery and called CQ.  Got a call back from a station in South Korea.  Of course that was last sunspot cycle, don't expect action like that these days.

If you want to key by holding two bare wires together, that would work fine!  Of course if you borrow an older tube rig, one of those wires might bite you. :-(

I don't advise you to rush out and buy a rig just for this, think about what kind of operating you want to do.  Of course I do strongly advise you to upgrade and get full HF privileges.  Ask around, look around, and pick an entry level rig that you can use to get your feet wet without breaking the bank.

Most of all, have fun, try new things, and learn new things about what you are doing.

73,
Don- KD0L
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KG7DRO
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2013, 08:08:41 PM »

Don - KD0L
 Thanks for the response and advice. I am convinced that this is a great use of our Amateur
frequencies. What a great Learning opportunity!

73
KG7DRO - Dave

 
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