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Author Topic: APRS is lost, or is it?  (Read 102144 times)
KD6CCP
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2014, 12:58:55 PM »

It's ham radio and it's fun! Why else even do it. It's fun, aprs to me is important. I travel a lot and those close to me find enjoyment charting my every move along the freeway. I can check into real weather stations that give me real numbers where I am headed not just a general overview. I like the comfort knowing others know where am at in case of emergency. I think it's part of ham radio that is more useful once you try it. Yeah we all have cell phones blah blah blah but not always the case when the power goes down or the grid is off. I think aprs has it's place in ham radio and until you give it a spin perhaps hold your expert comments until then.  Just sayin...
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AI8O
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Posts: 20


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« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2014, 11:44:43 AM »

The irony of this title amuses me!

APRS is NOT lost!

The whole point of APRS is to know exactly where you are.

You have found your niche is the ham world.

Don't let cranky old farts ruin your enjoyment of something you enjoy
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KB2HSH
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« Reply #32 on: March 04, 2014, 10:38:58 AM »

It's ham radio and it's fun! Why else even do it. It's fun, aprs to me is important. I travel a lot and those close to me find enjoyment charting my every move along the freeway. I can check into real weather stations that give me real numbers where I am headed not just a general overview. I like the comfort knowing others know where am at in case of emergency. I think it's part of ham radio that is more useful once you try it. Yeah we all have cell phones blah blah blah but not always the case when the power goes down or the grid is off. I think aprs has it's place in ham radio and until you give it a spin perhaps hold your expert comments until then.  Just sayin...

APRS has provided me with yet ANOTHER tool, besides using it for keyboard-to-keyboard QSOs and use through the remaining APRS satellites...I recently installed APRSdroid onto my Samsung Galaxy (my new girlfriend can watch my runs in "almost-real-time" on aprs.fi)...even though I'm using Endomondo to track my runs (marathon running and training).

John KB2HSH
Springbrook, NY
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VE7MKD
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2014, 06:22:17 PM »

Well I for one like APRS. My wife and I travel between provinces here in Canada to see my son and granddaughter. We sometime have to travel in crappy weather. So I feel better knowing my sons can see where we are, and if there is any problem they know where to begin to look. Also I can send my one boy messages while on the road.

My two cents.
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KN6TED
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2014, 05:38:31 PM »

I've been using APRS since I got my license in 2012.  It combines my two favorite things, computers and radio.  That being said, I was made communications director of a big bike event here in my local area this year.  I decided it was time to implement APRS.  By the end of the day, I had 15 stations beaconing their locations.  I was running off-frequency so as not to tie up the national APRS frequency.  I ran a digipeater and an igate, with a receiving station at the command center.  It was amazing how nice it was to not have to ask everyone where they were.  It helped tremendously throughout the entire event, and it really opened a lot of ham's eyes to APRS.  Big winner in my book!
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KD5KFL
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Posts: 55




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« Reply #35 on: July 06, 2014, 03:55:06 PM »

I have health problems, but I'm not dead yet. I go off roading in central NM. APRS lets me beacon my position to people who may not obsess about where I am, but may be concerned if I don't show up where I am expected. It won't save my life, but nobody needs to send out a search party for me.
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KD0SFY
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2014, 10:06:01 PM »

If all you are using APRS for is sending position beacons, you are just scratching the surface of what you can do with APRS. 
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 459




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« Reply #37 on: July 14, 2014, 04:31:50 PM »

If all you are using APRS for is sending position beacons, you are just scratching the surface of what you can do with APRS. 

While this is true, you could say the same about practically any technology.  How many people program their own computers?  If they aren't they're just scratching the surface of what they can do with a computer...
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KD0SFY
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #38 on: July 14, 2014, 10:26:48 PM »

Except it doesn't take much knowledge to be able to do more than position beacons with APRS. 
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