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Author Topic: Mobile 2M Simplex Conventions?  (Read 11008 times)
KI6VOS
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Posts: 17




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« on: September 15, 2013, 12:18:26 PM »

Hello...a Mobile Simplex Newbie here,

What is (or, are there?) "conventions" or "good amateur practices" regarding simplex communications when traveling?

Although I've never operated simplex while traveling -- because of a long trip coming up...I'd like to give it a shot...and want to ensure that I'm respectfully following expected protocols.

If one monitors 146.520*...calls "listening" a few times...and gets a response -- then what?

Is it "good amateur practice" to remain on 146.520? Or move to another simplex frequency? Or...what?
 
For example: In Northern California, the NARCC (Northern Amateur Relay Council of California) lists several simplex frequencies assignments between (~146.415 to ~146.595 and ~147.405 to ~147.585). That's the data...but how is it interpreted? While I understand these frequencies have been allocated for simplex...it's not clear to me how they are best (or, expected to be) used.

What are the expectations/protocols/good practices as to when to use a "non-calling" (e.g., other than 146.520) simplex frequency vs. a calling freq?

*IS 146.520 THE BEST CALLING FREQ?

Reading up on simplex prior to submitting this request, there are many (many!) posts on various Ham forums suggesting that 146.520 might not be widely monitored...and, in many locales, there are "local simplex calling" frequencies. If these reports are accurate, how would/could a traveller obtain information regarding "localized simplex calling"? Or...do you believe such reports are over-stated and 146.520 is as good as gold?

Thank you in advance for your comments and suggestions.

Best,
Rick

KI6VOS
 
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KC7YRA
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Posts: 256




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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2013, 12:34:44 PM »

While I'm certainly no expert, I believe the standard accepted protocol is to make initial contact on .52, then move to another simplex frequency if the QSO is going to continue for any length of time.

That said, there is so little activity around here, just parking on .52 and chatting is perfectly acceptable.  If anything, it proves that at least a little activity exists.

Brad
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K5LXP
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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 12:47:01 PM »

There was a time when 2M radios were crystal controlled and if you had more channels than 146.94 and 146.52, you were in fat city.  It was the courteous thing to do to move off and keep the frequency clear.  Anymore, I think contacts should be promoted on 146.520.  Any activity would be good activity.

I've had very few 146.520 QSO's traveling cross country over the years.  Practically speaking, unless the other station is going the same direction and speed you are, you will quickly exceed simplex range even if you do chance upon a contact.

APRS adds a twist with voice alert, but I've never had any luck scaring anyone up with that either.  I usually end up band scanning 145.11 through 147.570 and while that's endlessly spooling around not hearing anything, I'll be working HF.

Bottom line, don't worry about formalities.  However you can scare up a contact works, whether it's just saying "monitoring", calling CQ (which brings them out of the woodwork) or whatever.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM

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KD4LLA
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Posts: 463




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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2013, 05:52:11 PM »

I have had a few conversations on 146.520 while traveling.  Sometimes you see a vehicle w/ what looks like it has a ham antenna on it or a ham license plate.  Also done the "KD4LLA listening" on 52 on the road.  Sometimes you get a reply, sometimes not.

Once I was traveling I-94 in Wisconsin.  A ham I know was passing me on the same route (I was in a big-rig).  I got his attention and we spoke (on 146.520) for quite a few miles.  Eventually he got to far ahead of me.

Mike
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VE7WV
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2013, 01:34:39 PM »

I monitor and call on 146.52 all the time while driving distance and sometimes while driving locally. I live in a larger urban area, there are a few simplex centric folks who monitor more than the local repeater.

When out in the boonies I usually try calling randomly when I'm bored but also when approaching towns and villages.
If you find you aren't making contacts, perhaps try making a call with more than YOURCALL LISTENING.

As for moving off frequency, I've never felt the need. "652" is pretty quiet even here at home and one can always put a pause in the conversation and ask if anyone needs/wants to break in.
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K6LCS
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2013, 02:41:26 PM »

Reaching the crest of a hill and looking at a new area while I am driving, a simple
call of, "K6LCS visiting ... Where's the best restaurant available?" on 146.520 usually
brings folks onto the airwaves!

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
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